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The First Epistle to the Corinthians (New International Commentary on the New Testament) Hardcover – July 10, 1987


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Product Details

  • Series: New International Commentary on the New Testament
  • Hardcover: 904 pages
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.; 1st edition (July 10, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802825079
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802825070
  • Product Dimensions: 2.1 x 6.5 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #58,295 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Gordon D. Fee (PhD, University of Southern California) is professor of New Testament at Regent College, Vancouver, British Columbia. Gordon D. Fee es profesor emirito de Nuevo Testamento en Regent College, Vancouver, Canada, y ha escrito numerosos libros como "La lectura eficaz de la Biblia, Exegesis del Nuevo Testamento: manual para estudiantes y pastores, La primera epa­stola a los Corintios, y los publicados por la Coleccion Teologica Contemporanea: "Comentario de la Epa­stola a los Filipenses y Comentario de las Epa­stolas a 1 y 2 Timoteo y Tito. Douglas Stuart (PhD, Harvard University) is professor of Old Testament at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

Customer Reviews

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Fee does a great Job of explaining the text from an evangelical point of view.
kent delay
Dr. Gordon Fee's commentary on 1 Corinthians is one of the best commenataries on one of the most problomatic books in the NT.
Seeking Disciple
I have found the historical and original meanings to several sections to be extremely helpful.
4given4ever

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 27, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is simply one of the best commentaries I have ever read. I do not agree with his pentecostal or evangelical feminists views, but the quality of writing, exegesis, and argumentation are clearly superior to what you will find in most commentaries. Fee does a particularly good job of tracing the flow of thought. He doesn't just interpret verses as isolated, unrelated units of thought. His treatments of chapters 7 and 8 and 11:17-34 really changed the way I viewed this passages.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Ongkowidjojo on July 13, 2006
Format: Hardcover
One of my principle in pick up a commentary is when everthing equal, the newer is the better one. So when I planned to bought one commentary on 1 Corinthians, I prefered Garland's more than Fee's. Both come from a conservative point of view. They have almost the same size (Fee: 904; Garland: 896) and the same prize (Fee US$ 54; Garland US$ 50). Both also get very positive reviews. The different is Fee wrote his 1 Corinthians commentary in 1987 while Garland wrote in 2003, so there is almost twenty years gap between them.

Then when I planned to gave an expositionary preaching from 1 Corinthians 15, I knew that I need Fee's as a comparison. What a surprised! I find that at least for 1 Corinthians 15, I gain more insight from Fee than from Garland. For me, Fee's argument is more mature, and he is also braver and firmer when he must to state something. Garland make Fee as one of his sparring partner but when he disagrees with Fee, it seems to me that he do not give enough power to send his counter attack.

Both are good, really! But now if I must choose one commentary in 1 Corinthians, my choice is clear. For this time, the old recipe is the better one.

NB. I am also skimming Thiselton's work. This one is a huge commentary but at least from the preacher's point of view I must agree with D.A. Carson that "I do not have a good feel for it yet." Too many debate in it. If you need a third choice for 1 Corinthians, I will recommend Ancient Christian Commentary Series produced by Gerald Bray (ed.). You will be surprised with what you can get inside.
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful By David Kilpatrick on January 15, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Fee taught a course on 1 Corinthians for about 15 years at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary before completing this commentary (I only took his course on Textual Criticism). Thus, this book represents mature scholarship, thought, and an awareness of the kinds of questions people want answers to. The students at Gordon-Conwell were from every confessional background, so his teaching and writing has been for the whole church, and not geared toward charismatics. With about a dozen reviews already posted, I not only review Fee's book, but respond to some recurring comments in the other reviews.

Fee's logic is impressive. He takes 30-35 pages to untangle 1 Cor. 11:2-16, which represents one of the most difficult passages in the Greek NT. His evidence and reasoning are strong, and I've concluded the NIV (and most translations) botch this difficult passage. In trying to smooth out the difficulties in the Greek, our translations create meanings that are not well supported by the Greek nor the culture. Fee offers a sane exposition of this section.

Fee's argument that 14:33b-35 was not original to Paul but an early textual corruption may seem radical. Donald Carson, in his book on commentaries, inappropriately calls Fee's conclusion a "lapse," as if Fee thought this up himself. Yet this scholarly opinion goes back a long, long time. A. T. Robertson & A. Plummer's ICC on 1 Corinthians (1911) indicate that various scholars before their time thought those verses were an interpolation (e.g., Weinel, 1906, Schmiedel 1892, Holsten, 1880, and Hilgenfeld, n.d.). It would be difficult to argue that those scholars were motivated by our modern "feminist" movement! In more recent times, C. K. Barrett's Harper's/Black's commentary (1968) prefers the interpolation hypothesis, F. F.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Seeking Disciple VINE VOICE on October 16, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Gordon Fee's commentary on 1 Corinthians is one of the best commenataries on one of the most problomatic books in the NT. Scholars often debate the issues of 1 Corinthians such as the issue of the sexual immoral man in chapter five, the sexual purity of the Corinthians themselves in chapter six, the issues of the Lord's supper in chapter eleven, and the gifts of tongues and prophecy in chapters twelve through fourteen.

Dr. Fee dives into the book of 1 Corinthians with careful exegesis of the texts. He is a charismatic in his own practice but he is often critical of charismatic abuses within the spiritual gifts context of the book. Fee is also one who is not ashamed to put the words of those who might disagree with him in this work. All Greek words are transliterated for those who do not know Greek.

Overall this is a solid work on 1 Corinthians. While it lacks the expository outlines of Dr. John MacArthur's commentaries, it remains one of the deepest and best I've read on 1 Corinthians to date.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Shawn W. Gillogly on April 6, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is about as good a commentary on 1 Corinthians as you will find. That does not mean it is without flaws however. It only means that 1 Corinthians has not been as adequately explained yet as we would like.
If you are committed to the cessation of the gifts, seeing his interpretation in 1 Cor 12-14 is going to get you annoyed. However, I would say he is largely right. (And I am not a charismatic.)
The biggest issues for me in the commentary are the problematic ways he takes the passages rgarding the role of the women in the Church at Corinth. Most notorious is his conclusion, on textual critical grounds, that 1 Cor 14:34 does not belong in the text. This is despite the fact that evidence FOR the passage is overwhelming. Otherwise, this is a good commentary, but one with flaws.
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