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The Epistle to the Hebrews (New International Commentary on the New Testament) Hardcover – June 23, 1997


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Product Details

  • Series: New International Commentary on the New Testament
  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company; Revised edition (June 23, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802825141
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802825148
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 1.1 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #331,179 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Novum Testamentum
"Solid, sound, and scholarly. Its usefulness to students, pastors, clergy, and scholars will be immense."

The Bible Translator
"The original edition was still arguably the best English commentary on Hebrews for general use. . . . The update of this standard commentary is unreservedly welcomed."

Review and Expositor
"Here is an excellent commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews."

Calvin Theological Journal
"Every preacher and New Testament scholar should have a commentary by F. F. Bruce on Hebrews in his or her library." --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

F. F. Bruce (1910–1990) was Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester, England. Author of numerous commentaries and other books, he served as general editor of the NICNT series from 1962 to 1990. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

F. F. Bruce (1910-1990) was Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester in England. During his distinguished career, he wrote more than forty bestselling commentaries and books, including several titles published by InterVarsity Press, A Mind for What Matters and Paul, Apostle of the Heart Set Free. He also served as general editor of The New International Commentary on the New Testament.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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I recommend for all Bible students.
R. Greilich
I think this is another excellent commentary from F.F. Bruce.
David A. Bielby
Purchased as a textbook,it is the book I read first.
Dean Moore

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

53 of 54 people found the following review helpful By David A. Bielby VINE VOICE on July 1, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have to disagree with two of the reviewers here who have some negative comments on this commentary. As I am preaching through Hebrews, I've been looking at a number of commentaries. I look for helpful exegetical comments and summarizations, interaction with other scholarly viewpoints, and for spirituality in the comments. I believe Bruce gives us all three categories.

Let me illustrate what I mean. F.F. Bruce sees Hebrews 1 as part of a larger section of material extending through the end of chapter 2. He titles this 'The Finality of Christianity'. He then breaks chapter 1 into two parts, v.1-4 (more than prophets, Jesus is God) and 5-14 (superior to the angelic beings-citing seven groups of verses). He points out there are seven statements about Christ in v. 1-4 and seven scripture quote sections in v.5-14. He then goes on to draw implications from these that are helpful for the scholar somewhat, but more so for a bible course teacher or a preacher in the pulpit. One of his applications is the demolition of the JW view that Christ was originally an angel. After all the second section deals entirely with the concept that Christ is superior to angels.

His exegetical comments on the term 'universe' in Hebrews 1 help cut the legs out from under a lynch pin in the heretical view called 'open theism'. Although he doesn't take time to dive into the controversies, if you are familiar with them even a little, his comments are enough to help you realize that these verses are very significant in crucial debates among contemporary Evangelical circles.

I just found the observations he makes skip over the superfluous ones I have read in some other commentaries. His points seem pretty convincing and pretty relevant.
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Mark Sharp on June 30, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As I was preparing to teach an adult Sunday School class on the book of Hebrews I bought three books on the epistle. One was a "common man's" explanation, another was a commentary from a famous preacher, the other was F.F. Bruce's commentary. My thought to use the "common man's" version for simple breakdown of the book, the famous preacher for color, and F.F. Bruce would fill in with scholarly commentary and insights.

By the end of our class, I never even cracked the other two books. F.F. Bruce does it all. What I found was that the common man's explanation was a mess, and the famous preacher nearly identically copied F.F. Bruce's structure and argumentation (but he had cool stories).

The surprising thing about this commentary is Bruce's use of Evangelical poetry by Charles Wesley, Isaac Watts, and John Bunyon to illustrate points the writer of Hebrews was trying to make. His use of historical documents to bolster points was also helpful to me. In one instance he used a portion of a letter Lucian wrote regarding how Christians were looking after an imprisoned Christian named Proteus Peregrinus. This was used as an example of the type of love being called for in the 13th chapter.

To those who care about such things, it is a solidly Evangelical work. I am guessing Jesus Seminar scholars may want to set their hair on fire after reading some of Bruce's conclusions. His conclusions, though are based on solid reasoning and scholarship. They are not haphazard.

Another thing to warn is that this book is not for a beginner. The format and writing borders on the "dry" side. It's a commentary, not entertainment. But the treasures held inside are worth digging for. I really appreciate the effort he put into this.
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36 of 43 people found the following review helpful By James D. Van Horn on April 24, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Bruce has carefully and thoroughly digested the scholarship of the Book to the Hebrews. The novice might find some portions difficult or even beyond them but any Bible College student will benefit from the text and footnotes. I am using this book as the textbook for a course I am teaching in Hebrews.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Heather Tucker on March 7, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is said to be one of the best commentaries on Hebrews available. I am inclined to agree. This is not a devotional commentary such as MacArthur's or Matthew Henry's. Those are good for their purpose. If you are looking for a pastoral, technical commentary, look no farther. All the truths are presented that allow you to draw immediate application. I especially like Bruce's treatment of 2:6-9. He rightfully sees the quoted Psalm as messianic and fulfilled in Jesus as the last Adam. His comments on 3:15 are superb. I can't wait to finish out the book and apply all of the truths Hebrews has to offer. If you are studying Hebrews, you need this commentary.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Austin on June 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Hebrews tends to lend itself to misinterpretation and abuse. Bruce approaches it with the critical depth necessary for such a monumental book. For layperson and professional alike, he explains Hebrews in an accessible manner that engages the reader. His mastery of the original text, as well as any contemporary non-canonical works, helps frame the very gripping context in which Hebrews was written. For any student of Hebrews, this is a must read.
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Format: Hardcover
Frederick Fyvie Bruce (1910-1990) was a Biblical scholar who taught at a variety of universities, and was editor of The Evangelical Quarterly and the Palestine Exploration Quarterly. He wrote a number of influential books, such as Jesus and Christian Origins Outside the New Testament, Are the New Testament documents reliable?, New Testament History, The Defense of the Gospel in the New Testament, etc. He also wrote The Book of the Acts and The Epistles to the Colossians, to Philemon, and to the Ephesians in this series.

He wrote in the Author’s Preface to this 1964 book, “To many people… the Epistle to the Hebrews is just ‘the book about Melchizedek’ … Others find themselves out of their depth when they come across to references to ‘the blood of bulls and goats…’ and wonder what all this has to do with true religion.
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