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01. The Epistles of St. Clement of Rome and St. Ignatius of Antioch (Ancient Christian Writers) Hardcover – January 1, 1978


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01. The Epistles of St. Clement of Rome and St. Ignatius of Antioch (Ancient Christian Writers) + Didache, the Epistle of Barnabus, the Epistle and Martyrdom of St. Polycarp, the Fragments of Papius, the Epistle of Diogentu (Ancient Christian Writers) + St. Justin Martyr: The First and Second Apologies (Ancient Christian Writers)
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Product Details

  • Series: Ancient Christian Writers (Book 1)
  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Paulist Press (January 1, 1978)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080910038X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0809100385
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #692,956 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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The reading is excellent and very informing.
EMM
The translation is easy to read and accurate (I've compared it with the Greek), and the footnotes are very helpful without being arcane or overly technical.
Christopher S. Esget
There are few works that challenge the modern presuppositions of the early church like these of the earliest Christian tradition.
Stratiotes Doxha Theon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 30, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Along with volume 4 of the Ancient Christian Writers Series (Didache, Epistle of Barnabas...) these writings are second only to Scripture itself in early Church authority. In fact before the creation of the New Testament canon, the 1st epistle of Clement was widely regarded as Scripture.
This is a must-read for Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, and anyone who wants to know anything about the early Church.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Mark Lee on October 8, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Clement, bishop of Rome, was responding to reports about troubles again with those pesky Corinthian Christians. 40 years or so earlier, St. Paul had done the same. It's easy to see why for the first couple hundred years (even Eusebius, bp. of Ceasarea in Palestine considered it inspired in the early 4th century) this letter circulated with what would become the New Testament writings. His faith is apostolic as is his belief that he's merely standing in an authoritative line of men who are exhorting Christian behavior and beliefs. This letter was probably composed about the same time some of the writings of St. John were, and probably before 2 Peter and some of the pseudepigraphical Pauline literature.

This volume also shares with the reader the early 2nd century writings of Ignatius, bishop of Antioch and martyr. Again we get snapshots of early Christian communities in communion, part of the "great" Church, who submit to ecclesial authority, enjoy a sacred meal, etc.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Stratiotes Doxha Theon VINE VOICE on May 31, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderfully full and rich translation of St. Clement's letter to the Romans and St. Ignatius' 7 letters. With them we are treated to the doctrines of the early church on the structure and authority of church offices. There are few works that challenge the modern presuppositions of the early church like these of the earliest Christian tradition. This translation is ideal for sharing in a group study for their clarity letting the early fathers speak for themselves with limited interjection of commentary. Each section provides an introduction giving a brief outline of the lives of Clement and Ignatius. Each epistle is salted with note references. The notes are kept apart at the end of each epistle so that you can easily read the epistles without being distracted by lengthy footnotes on each page. The notes are there at the end of each epistle ready to shed more light on a particular passage without demanding notice at every turn of the page. The format is ideal for group or personal study. Very highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Christopher S. Esget on February 1, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful edition of these works. The translation is easy to read and accurate (I've compared it with the Greek), and the footnotes are very helpful without being arcane or overly technical. Anyone wanting to read these important early Christian works would be well served by this volume.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By EMM on December 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a must read for any Christian wanting to know the teaching and church practices during the time of the Apostles and the period immediately following them. The reading is excellent and very informing. I especially love St Ignatius letters.

I also found the Didache The teaching of the 12 Apostles is excellent reading.
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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Jerome S. on January 28, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Read the book. I'm sick and tired of writing reviews and having Amazon knock me off for no good reason (my reviews are never lengthy). This is a scholarly work and not for everyone. If you want to push back the walls of ignorance, read it. If you want to be amused, buy a different book. I apologize for the short and snippy nature of this review.
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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful By R. S. Fertig on September 22, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I enjoyed this book and recommend it, if for no other reason than to be informed about the thinking of early Christians. However, I disagree with the judgment echoed by some reviewers and stated by the translator that "Clement, representing the Occident, and Ignatius, representing the Orient, are in agreement regarding the form of Christianity which they profess. The Christian Church shows the same face, whether seen through the eyes of Clement, or those of Ignatius." (p.7) On my reading Clement and Ignatius are quite different. Clement's writing clearly stems from an understanding of the gospel, specifically in the manner that Paul outlines, and a high view of Scripture. Consider the following statement by Clement. "So we, too, who have been called by His will in Christ Jesus, are sanctified not through ourselves, or through our wisdom or understanding or piety or any works we perform in holiness of heart, but through the faith through which Almighty God has sanctified all men from the beginning of time. To Him be glory forever and evermore. Amen." (p. 28)

In contrast, Ignatius extrapolates significantly beyond Scripture. The following, from Ignatius's letter to the Magnesians, would have been most out of place in Clement's letter. "...the bishop is to preside in the place of God, while the presbyters are to function as the council of the Apostles..." (p. 70-71) In addition, Ignatius is enamored with the ascetic ideal and seeks his own martrydom to the point that he admonishes the churches not to pray for his deliverance. This mindset is largely absent from Clement's letter. Clement's goal seems to be to bring man before his creator in praise, while Ignatius seems intent to insert mediators between God and man--forgetting that there is only one (1 Tim. 2:5).
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