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573 of 581 people found the following review helpful
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I've had the Epson B11B198011 Perfection V600 Photo Scanner for two years. I compared it side-by-side with the V370 using the Epson software and also Vuescan by Hamrick Software.

Here is the concise comparison, based on the most common scanning tasks:

QUICK DOCUMENT SCAN: Both scanners handle this with one button. Both use LEDs instead of fluorescent bulbs, so there is no warm-up delay. There's virtually no difference between them. Use the included Epson software.

OCCASIONAL PHOTO SCANS: Both scanners excel at this, again with one button. No difference between them. Use the Epson Software

OCR: Both scanners include OCR software. Depending on your application, both do an acceptable job. Take your time, line up the pages carefully, rescan when a page has lots of errors. Neither scanner has an automatic document feeder, so you won't be hand-feeding 100 pages without some fatigue. No difference between the scanners.

BOOK/OBJECT SCANS: This is something I didn't know I would need before getting the V600. But if the scanner does not have a hinged lid designed for objects thicker than a piece of paper, it will be a major inconvenience to scan a book or a 3D object (I've scanned remote controls, artwork, school projects, etc.). Both scanners have a well-designed hinged lid, and work very well with thick books.

FILM SCANNING: This is where you start to see a difference between these two scanners. The V600 delivers a significantly better result than the V370 with transparencies. It's resolution is 6400 dpi vs 4800 dpi for the V600. This makes a real and noticeable difference with film, because the original is small and you want all the resolution you can get. In addition, the V600 has a secondary infrared lamp for film scanning, which can make a significant difference for color slides and negatives because it makes dust "disappear." The V370 does not have an IR lamp.

HIGH RESOLUTION SCANNING: Many people put a bit much emphasis on scanner resolution. The fact is, if you are not scanning film or doing some type of technical work where you zoom way in to an image, you will seldom scan a full-size original at the full resolution of the scanner, because each scan will be hundreds of megabytes! The resolution of the V600 is much higher than that of the V370, which will only make a difference if you scan film or do highly-detailed work. If you don't already know you have an application like this for the 6400 dpi of the V600, it is unlikely you will need more resolution than the 4800 dpi of the V370.

EPSON SOFTWARE (included): The Epson software has gotten better with every release. The newest version for the V370 does photo stitching and direct scanning to cloud accounts, in addition to one-button scanning and photo repair. Epson gives you four modes to choose from, each with a few more controls to tweak. My daughter will not touch Vuescan (see below) because the one-click Epson software does a great job for many jobs, and the Professional mode gives access to most settings to improve your scans. Mac and Windows are both well supported (I tested OS X 10.6 and Windows 7).

VUESCAN SUPPORT: Vuescan from Hamrick Software is an amazing third-party product that gives you significantly better control of every aspect of your scans. I've used it since buying the V600. I downloaded the latest release, which directly supports the V370, to do this review. However, I realized something: The included Epson software has gotten so good, casual or intermediate scanner users are unlikely to ever need Vuescan. And if you do need the extra control and features of Vuescan, you probably want the V600 scanner.

This is the key finding of this comparison: If you are the kind of person who will spend many hours scanning hundreds of photos, and learning how to tweak every possible setting to get the best scan before importing it into PhotoShop for further manipulation, then you want the V600. If you are an a less technical user who doesn't adjust digital photos in Photoshop or tweak scans in Vuescan or scan film, then you will be thrilled with the V370 with its included software. Both of these products are light years ahead of what scanners could do 10 years ago.

SUMMARY: Buy the V370 unless you are a PhotoShop guru who loves to tweak, or you have a lot of highly-detailed scanning work that requires 6400 dpi resolution. The V600 will do a significantly better job on negatives or slides, but if you have lots of film to scan, look into a film scanner.
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104 of 108 people found the following review helpful
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This review is based on my usage in scanning photographs for a large client restoration project; not documents. However, I suspect in scanning documents this scanner will perform flawlessly as it did with a massive amount of photographs. Epson has long been the leader in photograph scanning. Back in 2001, I remember paying over $500 for an Epson photo scanner and that was a deal back then. Today, Epson scanners deliver even better quality at affordable prices; quality sufficient for professional photographers.

Basic Scanner Specs:
-Optical Resolution: 4800 dpi with EPSON MatrixCCD®
-Hardware Resolution: 4800 x 9600 dpi with Micro Step Drive
-Maximum Resolution: 12,800 dpi with software interpolation
-Color Bit Depth: 48-bit internal / external
-Grayscale Bit Depth: 16-bit internal / external
-Maximum Scan Area: 8.5" x 11.7"
-Built in transparency lid for negatives (difference compared to V37
-Film holder for 35mm and slides

The Epson V370 is the same scanner as the Epson Perfection V37, just without the negative or transparency capability, providing for a different lid. If you are scanning negatives, the V370 is a far better option and will provide not just greater convenience, but better image scans off those negatives.

My comparison basis for this review was my friend's much higher spec (and more expensive) Epson V600 and the comparably priced Canon CanoScan LIDE 110. In reality, it is an unfair comparison to the Epson V600 based on the targeted resolution (same bit depth) difference in that if you need that size (for very large printing for example), you will need to select the V600 to maintain optimum quality throughout the workflow process (think major Photoshop editing). Nevertheless, excluding resolution difference, the V370 performs just as well for my purpose, delivering indistinguishable results for end use and client delivery(digital workflow and professional printing using Mpix and Millers Lab). Meanwhile, the CanoScan, which is less expensive than the Epson V370, delivered visibly (to me) lower quality photographic image reproduction than the V370 (and V37) for my purposes, using the same exact image. Bear in mind the scanned images were being brought in to Photoshop CS6 for image editing. Overall, I found the Epson to be far more accurate in contrast and color replication (I use hardware color calibrated IPS monitors). I also found the Canon interface far more clunky than the Epson and had actually uninstalled it.

As with any photographic scanning, especially in restoration efforts, the quality, preservation, and finish of the photograph is critical to final end results. Typically, without using Digital ICE (correction) software, matte photographs may present a problem, often yielding what appears to be dust spots due to the texture of the matte. Unlike the Epson V600, neither the V370 or V37 come with Digital ICE and thus does not automatically correct for the issue. However, in my usage, I found the V370 (like the V37) did a very good job in dealing with the matte; still, in many instances, minor Photoshop retouch was necessary. Glossy finished images reproduced fine, with no issues.

Installation of the scanner hardware and software was in a Windows 7 64 bit environment on a Dell Inspiron Computer. As an advanced user, I typically do not install OEM software that accompanies hardware devices. However, I found the Epson interface (Epson Scan) adequate. I did not install any of the provided document capture or Arcsoft software though and I typically recommend you do the same as it is often bloated, invasive, and generally inefficient.

Summation:

The Epson V370 (and V37) offer high quality scans. If you require an end product that is very large in print or digital size, then it might be worthwhile to upgrade to a scanner along the lines of the Epson V600 for the higher resolution. But absent a specific need, the V370 and V37 will perform incredibly well even for professional level photographic quality work.
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66 of 68 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon January 22, 2013
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
The new Perfection V370 is an extremely accurate scanner that has the ability (albeit with some fine tuning) to deliver spot on clones of photos and other materials that you need to digitize. I threw all kinds of things on the flatbed during my testing and I came away very impressed by the V370's ability to render even the subtlest details with sharp, color correct quality. That it can do this for a <$100 price might be the most impressive feat. My only concern is the build quality and cheap feel of some of the materials - especially compared to more expensive options like Canon's excellent CanoScan 9000F. However, if you're not doing high volumes of work, then save the extra $$$ and go with this model.
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115 of 129 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon January 23, 2013
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
When I first started scanning slides (remember slides?), I used a dedicated slide scanner to convert my analog slides to digital files. Although it was possible to scan slides with a flatbed scanner, the quality was much poorer. Today I'm willing to commit some of those beloved memories to a flatbed scanner.

The Epson V370 is a flatbed scanner that can copy both documents and photographic images. It comes with several pieces of software, including a quick scan feature that allows documents to be scanned with the press of a button; Epson Scan which allows great control over the scan; Media Impressions, which allows for the review and editing of a number of types of media files; and Scan and Stitch which allows the user to stitch oversize documents together. The software will handle documents and prints, negative film and slides. The film strips and slides are limited to 35mm film. The software includes what appears to be proprietary dust removal software, and has the ability to make a number of tone and color adjustments to the image, although most users would be better off making those adjustments in image processing software, like Lightroom or Photoshop. There doesn't appear to be any built-in calibration facility. The user's guide is only available on line, but not in a PDF format. Software is provided for both Windows and Apple computers.

The V370 is part of a complete line of flatbed scanners from Epson. Unfortunately, the resolution of 4800 p.p.i. is a great deal lower than the resolution of 35mm film. This means that a great deal of information from the original image is lost in the scanning. As a result, I can not recommend this scanner for serious slide and film scanning, although it might do for copying large prints. If all you want is document copying, the less costly Epson B11B207201 Epson Perfection V37 Color Photo Scanner (B11B207201) is available. Anyone serious about digitizing their slides and film will look at the Epson B11B189011 Perfection V500 Photo Scanner or Epson B11B198011 Perfection V600 Photo Scanner. Even though they cost twice as much as the V370, they have much better resolution, are faster, and have more features. (One could also look at the feature-rich Epson B11B178011 Perfection V700 Photo Scanner, but that copier costs seven times the price of the V370.)

This machine can copy photos. It just doesn't do it very well.
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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on July 29, 2013
After scanning some 200 slides, I noticed the scanned images suddenly had an unwanted horizontal green line across the whole image. Fortunately, Epson tech support replaced it & the second unit had same problem after scanning some 50 slides. Had to return it for a refund.
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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful
on February 27, 2013
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I was very excited about receiving this scanner, and I have not been let down. The set up was very easy, and scanning pictures in is a breeze. There's no warm up time, which makes the entire process so much faster. Thanks to the recognition software, you can scan multiples in at once, and they save as different documents. Also the scan-n-stitch software makes it very easy to piece together any large pictures and save them that way. I only had 2 huge ones, but the scanner handled them with no problem at all.

I have to say that the photo restoration quality is amazing as well-I had a ton of pictures from my great-grandparents, and thanks to this scanner the yellow-ish quality they had is gone, and the pictures almost look new again. The dust correction works flawlessly too. And although I have not enlarged any of my photos, I can say that the zoom on my pictures is great-there's very little digital noise at max zoom.

I've found the whole process very easy-they one-touch buttons are a good touch, and scanning to the cloud and my evernote account is very convenient. The scanner also comes with cables for a mac and PC, so that way everybody in the house can use it. I've heard from my brother that scanning in his homework to email to his teachers has not been a problem, especially because it converts it into a text/PDF document.

I also appreciate how earth friendly Epson is trying to be by making this a recyclable, low energy consumption product. I certainly would recommend this to anyone looking for a quality scanner.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on July 30, 2013
This was my second attempt to use an Epson Photo Scanner, and my last (the other was probably a V600). Both units exhibited vertical lines that appear to come from electronic noise. In fact, this unit had two faint pink lines the length of the bed, whereas my first unit had a single, prominent green line. It didn't matter whether I was scanning slides, prints, or gray cards -- they were always there. I thought the first one was just a fluke, but now I'm suspicious of the whole product line. If you do buy one, run some tests immediately to confirm that it is working properly. Good luck.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on January 28, 2014
I contacted Epson support after following all the suggestions on thier troubbleshooting page related to lines in the finnished product. the agent had me uninstall and reinstall. after which she informed me that the unit was experiencing "hardware failure" and they would replace the unit. BUT I WAS REQUIRES TO GIVE THEM APPROVAL TO PUT A HOLD ON MY DEBIT CARD FOR THE AMOUNT OF THE PURCHASE PRICE. for two + weeks while they shipped me a new unit and I returned the faulty one. I had to see that the faulty unit was shipped to them. I recieved the new unit last week and installed it. only to find the new unit has the exact same problem. once again I have contacted Epson Support only to have them tell me to wipe the unit off with a damp soapy cloth and if that dosen't work ..."If the same issue persists, it appears to be an issue with the scanner's hardware itself and will require service" It appears that I am going to have to deal with CUSTOME SERVICE, OR IN MY OPINON THE LACK OF CUSTOMER SERVICE to get a third unit that might work properly.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon February 11, 2013
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This Epson V370 scanner and software achieve remarkably good results, particularly for its low price which is achieved in part via fairly cheap feeling plastic construction. (On the plus side, Epson notes that the plastic case is recyclable.) Making this unit stand out from the crowd at this low price is that it is capable of scanning unmounted film (negatives or positive 35 mm) and mounted 35 mm slides using another light inside the cover, which is exposed by removing the top document mount.

I have almost no reservations at all recommending this unit for document scanning. It is fast, instant-on due to the LED lamp (vs old scanners which use fluorescents requiring warm-up), and gives quality results. For Mac users, do note that the buttons do nothing for you - as Epson has not gotten their Event Manager, which responds to the buttons, to operate on Mountain Lion for this device. So, document scan use requires launching the Epson Scan software to do the scanning. Personally, I get the most compact PDF files that have been also converted to searchable text by scanning with the Adobe Acrobat Pro File > Create > PDF from Scanner... command. The Epson's TWAIN driver is recognized automatically by Adobe Acrobat Pro.

The Epson software is a bit awkward (and with an ugly UI), and there is no user-manual. As another review pointed out, you have to go to the Epson web site and view the documentation for another scanner to find documentation on using the software. And even then, the documentation is web-only with no downloadable PDF. The installation software installs a web link to the user manual for the unit itself - but the URL doesn't work. You have to go to the Epson support site manually to get the link to display. Pretty ridiculous to not just provide a PDF manual, much less a working link. The software's settings panels based on a usage choice of "Auto", "Home", "Office" or "Professional" are pretty awkward - with some settings appearing in only one of each, where you might expect 'Professional' to include ALL settings. The "Home" group seems oriented towards photos and slides; the "Office" group towards documents.

For photo and slide scanning, the results are quite good if you are not a 'prosumer' - and if you are, you wouldn't be looking at such a low priced scanner anyway, I would imagine. Comparing the results to my Canon CanoScan 9000F Color Image Scanner which is just one step above the Epson, priced 50% higher and for some reason 50% thicker in size as well, the image quality of the Epson at first seems quite similar. On close examination, though, all medium to dark areas of the Epson scans are filled with digital color noise - pixels of colors not related to the main color of the area. In contrast, the Canon has none of this, with pure tones in all areas. The Epson colors, even with color-restoration applied to old photos, seem much more like the original, which is a good thing, I think - while the CanoScan over-saturates. Saturation is easy to fix; getting rid of the color noise generated by the Epson scanner is more difficult and hence I cannot recommend it for people with a discerning eye.

Scanning a 35mm slide at 4800 dpi took about 90 seconds. The same scan on the CanoScan 9000F took 40 seconds.

Removing the white document cover in the lid to expose the upper lamp for film/slide scanning is easy. Replacing it is quite tricky, requiring aligning various bits. (In contrast, the CanoScan 9000F document cover pops out and back in without much attention.)

As another reviewer noted, it is annoying that the power 'cord' for this Epson is a large brick that makes the adjacent sockets of a power strip unusable, or which requires yet another short extension cord to plug it into a UPS battery unit.

Dust and Scratch removal is via software, and appears to do nothing in my tests. (The CanoScan 9000F uses an infrared dust removal process, but unfortunately, it doesn't accomplish much in my tests either. Others have reported success with 3rd party scanner software with the Canon.)

Optical Character Recognition (OCR) is made possible with the included ABBYY FineReader Sprint 8.0 which gave very good results in my test.

One reviewer claimed that this scanner was completely silent. Not true. Like all flatbed scanners, it makes various whirring/whishing/buzzing noises as the optical reader moves across the bed. To my ears, it is about the same as the CanoScan, but definitely quieter than the scanners built-into our four Brother and HP MFC units.

Bottom line: great value for office document scanning or home hobby photo/slide/negative scanning. Woefully inadequate documentation; awkward software; scan buttons which do not function for Mac Mountain Lion users; power 'brick' awkward for plugging into power strip.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on January 22, 2014
I have used a V300 for years but had to abandon it when we upgraded from XP to Windows 7. The V370 seemed the obvious replacement. It isn't - the software is appalling. It is not by any standard plug-and-play, or, if it is, perhaps I could have avoided four installations and several lengthy and frustrating sessions with Epson technical support. After a full day on the installation process, I at last have the scanner running, but not in any way as advertised. Perhaps this is due to the poor quality of the support staff. The first person insisted that I could only use the Copy function if the printer was plugged directly into the scanner (not true, impractical if you are using different printers for B&W production runs and for color printing, and in any case impossible). The second person told me that it was only a scanner, and could not copy. The third (Level 2 support) told me that, despite having a "scan to email" button, this function is not available with Windows 7 (I don't know if this is true or not; I can't make it work).

Some hints for those contemplating acquiring this scanner, based on my bad experience (which may not be typical):
- Install just the scanner software, not the various bundled extras. However, the CD is 18 months out of date (it does not have the July 2012 update to the scanner software). You need to go to the Epson website and download the new driver.
- Install this driver. You may get a message from Windows saying "perhaps this installation failed". Ignore this - apparently it's caused by Epson having code that clashes with Windows - and just go ahead and click the button accepting the installation as is. Make sure that the scanner works satisfactorily as a scanner. Do not attempt any other functions yet.
- At this point the Copy button on the scanner will not work. You need to go back to the website and download and install the Copy utility. Do not install this ahead of getting the scanner functioning; apparently the driver update and the utility can cause conflict if done in the wrong order. The Copy button still won't work, but you can go to All Programs, then into Epson Software, right-click it and put a shortcut to Copy on your task bar.
- The PDF button will probably function at this point. Do not be misled by the appearance of the usual Scan screen when you click it; the file should still be saved as a PDF.
- Pressing the Email button will open a dialog box asking you what program you want this button to be associated with. Email will not be an option, so abandon the attempt.
- If you feel especially confident, you can now install the bundled software (the stitching program especially looks useful, but I haven't tried it yet).

I have no doubt that this will turn out to be a good basic paper scanner and copier (I cannot comment on slide and negative scanning, as I have a separate scanner for that). But it amazes me that Epson, which had a simple and reliable plug-and-play model in the V300, should have made such a hash of producing what superficially appears to be an identical device.
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