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Erasing David


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Product Details

  • Actors: Frank M. Ahearn, Cameron Gowlett
  • Directors: David Bond, Melinda McDougall
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: MPI HOME VIDEO
  • DVD Release Date: June 28, 2011
  • Run Time: 80 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004SEUJNC
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #406,205 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

How much do the government and private corporations know about you? How much can they find out? That's the question posed in this chilling documentary that charts the unimaginable limits of the modern information state. In order to discover how much of his privacy he has left, David Bond sets out to disappear from his life in England for a month. Leaving behind his pregnant wife and young daughter, as well as the conveniences of modern life, Bond tries to go underground in modern Europe. But with a pair of topnotch private detectives on his trail using all the information that the surveillance society has made available, Bond finds his task far trickier than he ever imagined.

Customer Reviews

He really didn't try hard enough.
Robin Benson
As this is not government surveillance, they don't track him this way except when he reacts to a specific email they send him.
K. Harris
I can't think of any city in the US that has that amount of surveillance on a full time basis.
NeoBK

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
As the intriguing documentary "Erasing David" began, I suddenly got all excited. An absolutely killer premise is introduced and I knew that I was going to love this film. Taking on an important and timely topic, filmmaker and star David Bond wants to explore the corporate and governmental intrusion into our privacy. Ridiculous amounts of our personal information is stored in various databases and, in many ways, this can lead to unexpectedly negative consequences. I think that's a given--identity theft and fraud have certainly been the fastest growing areas of criminal enterprise in recent years. And it's all because our private data is accessible, either purposefully or by accident, in more ways and to more people than we can possibly imagine. To prove his point, Bond tackles a fantastic experiment. Leaving his family behind, he wants to go off the grid for thirty days and see if a private investigation firm can track him down based on publicly accessible information.

Some of the set-up scenes are really well done. It was especially interesting to see Bond contact various corporate enterprises and request reports as to the information they kept on him. Also, the more intimate sequences involving his wife and daughter had a genuine warmth and humor. He also visits a couple of people who had issues with mistaken identity or fraudulent activity on their names--and it's all but impossible to unring that bell! But again, it's not a revelatory concept in this day and age. I've heard stories much worse than those presented here. Strangely, though, the most important aspect of the film feels a bit thin. The main part of Bond's documentary is him going to ground--it is an idea and concept that I found genuinely compelling. Early scenes, however, seem fairly contrived.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By NeoBK on December 2, 2010
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Erasing David is a documentary about how much everyone out there already knows about our personal lives and entertains the possibility of someone being able to regain total privacy in their life. From the government to the businesses we deal with online and offline, there is a ton of data that is collected and stored on us that can be used in many different ways. Internet providers keep track of every website that we visit and hold this information for at least 12 months. Cell phone companies keep a record of every call we make and every incoming call we receive for at least 12 months. Online websites that we use also keep track of our personal information and buying habits as well. Social websites like LinkedIn, MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter are taking over our daily routines and in doing so we are intentionally giving up our privacy. The problem is that it leaves us exposed and vulnerable. Tweet about going to Chicago for the weekend and everyone knows about it. Even the guy who is planning to break into your house tonight. Write a blurb about going out to a club downtown on your facebook page and anyone of your 10,000 friends, that you really know nothing about anyway, could show up at the club and follow you home. Sure these are extreme examples, but continue to tell everyone where you live, work and where your going to be all the time and eventually it will lead to bad things.

I liked the idea of this documentary but was disappointed with the result. There were so many things he did wrong that I am surprised he lasted as long as he did. There were so many simple mistakes that he made.

1. Using a cell phone
2. Using a payphone
3. Using a computer at an internet cafe
4. Going to see and stay with friends and family.
5.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robin Benson on September 24, 2011
Format: DVD
An interesting idea for a documentary but there was hardly anything new here. A thing that never seems to get mentioned in these sort of 'we-know-everything-about-you' programs is that they apply to everybody, especially if you have electronic dealings with the state or corporations. The hypothetical 'watchers' are also watched. There isn't some central database with details of every bit of our lives, it's scattered electronically all over the place and even governments, with a desire instant information, find it a hard job to cope with so much data. Clearly not everything is known about everybody, otherwise lots of criminals would be caught in no time at all.

Director David Bond wanted to vanish for a period of time and see if two people-finders could find him. He really didn't try hard enough. He might just as easily have gone to stay with a friend and stayed indoors for three months, stretching his legs in the back yard after dark.

I thought the documentary was hard work. The music was excessively loud, filming and editing followed the predictable documentary style of shaky hand-held camera work, loads of close-ups of talking heads, bland seconds of nothing in particular being shown to move the whole thing along while a voice-over explained some point.

Another director with a tighter brief might have wrapped it all up in thirty minutes.
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Format: DVD
As the intriguing documentary "Erasing David" began, I suddenly got all excited. An absolutely killer premise is introduced and I knew that I was going to love this film. Taking on an important and timely topic, filmmaker and star David Bond wants to explore the corporate and governmental intrusion into our privacy. Ridiculous amounts of our personal information is stored in various databases and, in many ways, this can lead to unexpectedly negative consequences. I think that's a given--identity theft and fraud have certainly been the fastest growing areas of criminal enterprise in recent years. And it's all because our private data is accessible, either purposefully or by accident, in more ways and to more people than we can possibly imagine. To prove his point, Bond tackles a fantastic experiment. Leaving his family behind, he wants to go off the grid for thirty days and see if a private investigation firm can track him down based on publicly accessible information.
Some of the set-up scenes are really well done. It was especially interesting to see Bond contact various corporate enterprises and request reports as to the information they kept on him. Also, the more intimate sequences involving his wife and daughter had a genuine warmth and humor. He also visits a couple of people who had issues with mistaken identity or fraudulent activity on their names--and it's all but impossible to unring that bell! But again, it's not a revelatory concept in this day and age. I've heard stories much worse than those presented here. Strangely, though, the most important aspect of the film feels a bit thin. The main part of Bond's documentary is him going to ground--it is an idea and concept that I found genuinely compelling. Early scenes, however, seem fairly contrived.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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