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Erasing Iraq: The Human Costs of Carnage Paperback – April 15, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0745328973 ISBN-10: 0745328970

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Erasing Iraq: The Human Costs of Carnage + Behind the Invasion of Iraq + War Without End: The Iraq War in Context
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Pluto Press (April 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0745328970
  • ISBN-13: 978-0745328973
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,699,474 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"If I could only recommend one book that provides a comprehensive overview of both the situation in Iraq today, and the decades of US-backed policy it took to create this nightmare scenario, Erasing Iraq is it." --Dahr Jamail, author and independent journalist

About the Author

Michael Otterman is an award-winning freelance journalist and human rights consultant. He was a recent visiting scholar at the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Sydney. He is the author of American Torture (Pluto, 2007).

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Cariboo on February 13, 2013
Format: Paperback
In the forward to this fine book, Dahr Jamail writes that if he had to recommend just one book on the state of Iraq today after decades of American intervention, this would be the one. Though I've only read a fraction of what Jamail has on the subject, I couldn't agree more. This is a very readable overview of the sheer horror that has enveloped Iraq, and is filled with both facts and personal narratives that really illuminate what the authors call "Iraqi sociocide." I am fairly well versed in the names, dates, and figures related to the Iraq conflict, but the personal stories in this book are heart-wrenching. If you are looking for a feel-good read, this is not it. But if you want an honest and thorough report of what has been done to Iraqi society, you will not be disappointed. Although the book is scarcely over 200 pages, it covers a lot of ground: refugees, mainstream media distortion, looting, civilian death counts, and much more.

I am shocked and saddened that this is only the second Amazon review on this important book. It deserves a wide audience.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Deward Hastings on November 5, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There's a certain . . . disinclination . . . to view one's own Country as "evil", but this review of what "we" did to Iraq (and why) makes it hard to spin it any other way. It's not the first time, either . . . "we" did much the same to Viet Nam, with hardly any better excuse . . .
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