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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thank God they were brave enough to release this album
If you think about it, this was a very risky album for Erasure to put out. Their popularity kept building, culminating with the release of the Chorus album and the ABBA-esque E.P. I think their casual fans started to lose touch with I Say, I Say, I Say. They surely abandoned Erasure when their self-titled album came out, a year later.
This album was Vince Clarke's...
Published on April 15, 2004 by Larry D. Rodriguez

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some good songs, but definitely not Erasure's best
"Erasure" was not a good choice of title for this album, because it does not sound all that much like Erasure at all. Instead of their usual pop hooks and gorgeous melodies, this album is littered with overblown moody ballads. Still, there are some diamonds in the rough, and some of the ballads are quite beautiful. The first single "Stay With Me"...
Published on May 26, 2000 by J C M


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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thank God they were brave enough to release this album, April 15, 2004
This review is from: Erasure (Audio CD)
If you think about it, this was a very risky album for Erasure to put out. Their popularity kept building, culminating with the release of the Chorus album and the ABBA-esque E.P. I think their casual fans started to lose touch with I Say, I Say, I Say. They surely abandoned Erasure when their self-titled album came out, a year later.
This album was Vince Clarke's retribution, for having been forced to stick to the confines of the three-minute song format. Granted, staying within the mold yielded some truly great songs that have stood the test of time, like A Little Respect, Blue Savannah, and Love to Hate You. However, Vince Clarke is a true musician at heart, and this album was his chance to expand beyond the limitations of an electro-pop format.
I think the best way to judge this album is to listen to it in tandem with the prior release, I Say, I Say, I Say. On Erasure, Andy Bell sings with much more feeling. Grace is one prime example; listen to Andy sing, "Where's the sense in senseless violence?" He is vocally very bold, without sounding embarassing or kitschy. His vocals are full-on, and never err.
There is a lot of naked emotion on this album. Sono Luminus, Rock Me Gently, and Stay With Me are very emotional songs, that take the risk of being so, without failing. If Sono Luminus and Rescue Me's lyrics seem a tad New-Agey, it doesn't matter. Erasure "gets the balance right" (to paraphrase Depeche Mode). Plus, if you really listen to the album's lyrics, you will understand how clever Erasure is on drawing upon religious themes, without sounding preachy or silly. How about, "Take me to the tree, it has a strange effect on me?", from Rescue Me?
Sure, Diamanda Galas alone is enough to scare off the casual listener, with her freakish wailing sound. But, again, you have to give Erasure credit for reaching this far out, to project a mood. Rock Me Gently really becomes a magnum opus, with her singing in the extended instrumental interlude. Aside from its incredible length (10 minutes!), it is a personal favorite for its poignant lyrics. The video for the song is a touching tribute to Marilyn Monroe, and is one of their very best in my mind.
If nothing else, this is the album that spawned Fingers & Thumbs. It is their greatest dance-floor "anthem", in my opinion, and one of their very best singles. Again, the video is one of Erasure's best.
I wish that Angel could have been released as a fourth single. After the opening interlude, it develops into a single-ready tune. I wonder why Erasure didn't release it as a single!!
From start to finish, this album is an unqualified success, injected with some of Erasure's finest lyrics. The only song that might be labeled a little weak is Love the Way You Do So, sounding a trifle too arch and contrived. Still, for a slightly weaker track, it beats the hell out a lot of other album's weak cuts (La Gloria, anyone?). Plus, after repeated listens, I have come to appreciate its subtle, even flow.
The album ends with A Long Goodbye, which is reminscient of Home, from Chorus. The first time I heard it, it almost brought a tear to my eye!
If you are looking for easy hooks and melodies, play the Pop! best-of compilation; to heal an aching heart, or stir your soul, Erasure is the album of choice.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's more than pop confection!, November 3, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Erasure (Audio CD)
Having listened for the first time both "Erasure" and "Cowboy" one right after the other, there are definitely some contrasts between the typical music of the latter album and the uniqueness of the former. In this album Erasure try to show what their skills really can do when they push themselves into something they don't usually do. The work from this new situation was by all means a very successful experiment. Vince turns out beautiful soundscapes and beats, and Andy takes his talents one notch further. I admire Vince for not using some cheesy drumb and bass sound, and his reliance on analogue synthesizers gives his music a unique Erasure quality. Some of their songs on this album are their strongest, in terms of their emotional and lyrical power, with "fingers & thumbs" being one of their best dance ballads yet. This is more introspective than the others, and listening to it shoulld be done when one feels in a reflective mood. Truly a remarkable album.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Prepare for a journey, December 27, 2002
By 
This review is from: Erasure (Audio CD)
Erasure's self-titled album marks the group's first real exposure of their overtly emotional, surreal, painfully pensive, yet beautifully composed lyrics and chords that have become Erasure mainstays. The introduction, like a great opera or oratorio, sets the mood and energy as it builds and magically morphes into song #2, and thus the journey begins. Soon you realize you are hearing the words, emotions, thoughts, and feelings of Andy Bell as he describes the course of a romantic relationship post-break up. From his pleadingly beautiful arrangment of being "ever so lonely" to the bitterness and resentment of seeing an ex-bf with a new romantic interest. Moving forward along with him, you begin to move pass the hurt and despair of a love lost, making odes to the muses, and revelations to god, ending up exactly where you began, in a state of independance and energy, moving ever so forward, single or not. This is a great cd for anyone trying to voice their love lost emotions, someone in search of understanding, and inspiration.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Ambient Masterpiece, September 29, 2002
By 
This review is from: Erasure (Audio CD)
I am relatively familiar with Erasure's music, although I cannot say that I know too much about their work pre-I Say I Say I Say.
That aside, though, I feel compelled to express my opinion on this, their self-titled album. To begin with, this is an album that you will probably HAVE to listen to in its entirety in one sitting (or, in my case, over and over in one sitting) in order to grasp the full impact behind this work of art. Each and every track is a beautiful, emotional, melodic journey straight to the heart. When taken as a whole, however, they form to produce one of the most cohesive "concept" albums ever (truly this album is greater than the sum of its individual parts). THIS IS WHAT MUSIC SHOULD BE. Some have expressed their discontent with the length of the album (over 70 minutes) or individual songs (the longest clocking in at nearly 10 minutes). This is an example of the attitude toward and unfortunate state of "pop" music today. True art cannot, and should not, be judged by predetermined expectations of various constraints. Certainly in some cases albums tend to ramble on with unnecessary tracks or endless vocal repetitions. This is not the case here. If you are a connoisseur of romantic ballads and are weary of the current slate of musical offerings, I HIGHLY recommend this brilliant work by arguably the most accomplished synth-popsters in recent memory. You may end up wishing the album went on for another 70 minutes....
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Of The Best!!, June 16, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Erasure (Audio CD)
I was pleased to see that, in 1995, Erasure had released a new album. I was simply blown away, though, at the different direction this one took. Gone were the campy, almost empty, songs that I had loved for almost a decade. In their place was a set of ethereal and thought-provoking songs that seem more part of a whole production rather than a list of tracks. Erasure really tapped into true emotion with "Grace", "Stay With Me", and especially "Rock Me Gently". This certainly isn't music to dance to, it's music to live to.
If ordered to pick one album and destroy the rest, I would keep this one.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Haunting and emotional, December 16, 2002
By 
Scott C. Smith (Happy Valley, OR) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Erasure (Audio CD)
The self-titled "Erasure" marked a departure of the typical Erasure pop-wave style, and the end result is an honest, emotional excursion into melancholy.
Vice Clarke still paints with an electronic palette, but the music is more focused, almost minimalistic, accompanied by Andy Bell's desperately honest lyrics and powerful delivery. All is not bleak, as there are real moments of joy throughout.
Actually, Vince and Andy pull off a bit of misdirection; the album begins with a very "Erasure" sounding song, "Intro: Guess I'm into Feeling," followed by "Rescue Me." The mood makes a sudden change with "Sono Luminus," and its emotional pull is unmistakable. "Sono Luminus" segues into "Fingers and Thumbs (Cold Summer's Day)" and the listener is carried along with the emotional tide for the remainder of the album.
"Erasure" is not as accessible as "The Innocents" nor is it the upbeat, cheesy pop found on "Abba-esque." However, for the patient listener, the payoff is 71 minutes of haunting, emotional music.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A True Masterpiece, October 23, 2001
This review is from: Erasure (Audio CD)
I have to agree with the majority of reviews...this is truly a masterpiece among Erasure's musical arsenal. There was never before, and will probably never be after, another Erasure album like it. On its own level, it is a definitive Erasure project and most undoubtedly, their most significant.
While I will always believe The Innocents to be the sole definition of Erasure...as it (like this album) can never be repeated in its perfection, "Erasure" will stand on its own for the sheer awe-inspiring epic that it is. I was so disappointed to hear and read that so many fans felt that this was the worst Erasure album ever. I can only assume that those who felt this way are only fans of Erasure for their dance sensibility, and nothing more.
For new Erasure-philes, The Innocents is your introduction. For the seasoned listener, "Erasure" will seal your appreciation and respect for the greatest musicians we've known.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I have to review this, June 25, 2002
By 
Michael Higgins (Pittsburgh, PA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Erasure (Audio CD)
Erasure is not a band known for mature, complex music. I listen to them when I want fun, campy pop beats to program to. That said, this album is actual music, the kind you can close your eyes and listen to. It's fairly dark and is more ambient than anything else by Erasure. There are still, of course, silly synthesizer sounds and campy crooning. Oddly enough, the combination works (at least for me).
I guess I wasn't paying attention when it came out, but I gather from the other reviews that this album didn't do too well and disappointed a lot of people. Oh well, their loss I guess. I can only imagine how they react to other ambient-ish dance-ish music (I'm guessing they haven't listened to a lot of FSOL).
So, if your idea of Erasure is confined to The Innocents, this album will be a bit of risk for you. It's my favorite though, and many of the songs are worth the price of the album alone.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Innovative and brilliant, May 1, 2006
This review is from: Erasure (Audio CD)
I have been a fan since their first album, Wonderland. and this is my favorite Erasure album.

Why?

Because it is brilliant in the way Pink Floyd's the Wall is brilliant...well, not really. Anyway, you get my point.

Erasure's Erasure feels and plays like an experimental album, with each of the songs somehow seguing into the next effortlessly. The songs themselves are unorthodoxically structured, with layered sounds that never cease to amaze even after multiple listenings. Kudos to Vince.

Andy's vocals are brilliant here. He is able to convey emotions and feelings into his songs unlike he has before or since. My favorites are Sono Luminous, Rescue Me, Fingers and Thumbs and Angel.

The songs are atmospheric, moody and melodic, and they never get boring.

Erasure at their finest.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the landmark pop recordings of the '90s., June 23, 2000
By 
Augustus Caesar, Ph.D. (Eugene, Oregon United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Erasure (Audio CD)
From his years in Depeche Mode and Yaz and through all his records with Erasure, Vince Clarke has had one of the most remarkable (and successful) songwriting careers in pop music. His forte has always been the three minute pop single, packed with melody, hooks and intricate arrangements. With Andy Bell, his writing took on a more acute sense of popcraft, and Erasure was the most consistent feature on the British singles charts from the late 80s on, charting more than thirty times since 1987. In 1995, however, Clarke and Bell unexpectedly abandoned their usual frenetic, dancefloor formula and made this, their longest (71.5 minutes), most ambitious undertaking. While Andy Bell's voice has never sounded more angelic, and his singing has never been more confident and assured, the star of this album is quite obviously Vince Clarke, who unveils a stunning array of soundscapes, melodies and hooks, fresh from his dome-shaped backyard studio. This is quite a startling turn for Erasure fans, but it works 100%. This is the most rewarding and challenging, albeit least typical, album in the Erasure canon, and a true feast for Clarke fans. The album has a dreamy, subdued feeling, without the usual dance-crazy singles Erasure is best known for. It also wasn't much of a hit with the fans--it barely cracked the British top ten album charts and its singles, while still hits, didn't storm towards the pole position like they had in the past. Perhaps that's why the boys returned to their classic style on the follow up to "Erasure," "Cowboy." However, everyone should count themselves fortunate that they ever made this gem in the first place. They'll probably never make another one like it, so immerse yourself in this: one of the most unusual, unique and extraordinary pop music releases of the '90s.
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Erasure (Limited Edition)
Erasure (Limited Edition) by Erasure (Audio CD - 1995)
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