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Eric Sink on the Business of Software (Expert's Voice) 1st Edition

40 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1590596234
ISBN-10: 1590596234
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Eric Sink on the Business of Software (Expert's Voice) + The Business of Software: What Every Manager, Programmer, and Entrepreneur Must Know to Thrive and Survive in Good Times and Bad + Starting a Tech Business: A Practical Guide for Anyone Creating or Designing Applications or Software
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Eric Sink graduated in 1990 from the University of Illinois with a degree in computer science. After living for a year in Spain, he spent five years at Spyglass, where he led the group that developed the Web browser later to become known as Internet Explorer. In 1997, Eric left Spyglass and founded SourceGear, which is now a leading vendor of version control tools. In 2002, SourceGear was honored by Inc. magazine as one of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in America.

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Product Details

  • Series: Expert's Voice
  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 1 edition (March 20, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590596234
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590596234
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.7 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,148,582 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Duff HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
My contact at Apress recently sent me a copy of Eric Sink on the Business of Software by, of course, Eric Sink. He's the person responsible for coining the phrase "micro-ISV", and he's the chief bottle-washer at SourceGear. This book is a compilation (and commentary and/or expansion) of some of his postings from his blog, and they all relate to the subject of running a small software company where you are responsible for everything. There is very good material in here, even if you don't think you'll ever sell anything you code on your own...

Contents:

Part 1 - Entrepreneurship: What Is a Small ISV?; Whining by a Barrel of Rocks; Starting Your Own Company; Finance for Geeks; Exploring Micro-ISVs; First Report from My Micro-ISV; Make More Mistakes

Part 2 - People: Small ISVs - You Need Developers, Not Programmers; Geeks Rule and MBAs Drool; Hazards of Hiring; Great Hacker != Great Hire; My Comments on "Hitting the High Notes"; Career Calculus

Part 3 - Marketing: Finding a Product Idea for Your Micro-ISV; Marketing Is Not a Post-processing Step; Choose Your Competition; Act Your Age; Geek Gauntlets; Be Careful Where You Build; The Game Is Afoot; Going to a Trade Show; Magazine Advertising Guide for Small ISVs

Part 4 - Sales: Tenets of Transparency; Product Pricing Primer; Closing the Gap, Part 1; Closing the Gap, Part 2; Just Do It

Index

I think every decent developer/programmer has at some point imagined writing some piece of software that they could sell and make a fortune on. It's true that a very, very small minority ever act on that, but it's not as far-fetched as you might think in the Internet Age.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Alex Martelli on February 21, 2007
Format: Paperback
Mildly interesting to anybody involved in software development; reasonably useful if you're involved in _managing_ SW development; indispensable if you're thinking of starting a SW development firm or joining a startup in a very early phase. Each chapter is well written, although the book as a whole suffers a bit in terms of organization by too closely reflecting the chapters' origins as blog entries -- deeper editing might have made the book a better experience when reading from start to finish.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Adnan Masood on July 23, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you have been following up Eric Sink's essays on his blog, you probably already have bought this book and enjoyed every single line of it. For others, Eric Sink is `Software Craftsman' at SourceGear and a writer extraordinaire on all things technology related.

Eric's writings range from trenches of software development life cycle, management, people, software business, innovation, process and software engineering. This 300 page book is divided into four parts: Entrepreneurship, People, Marketing and Sales. Entrepreneurship section consists of seven essays dealing with topic of starting and running your software business, its pitfalls, pros and cons. People section comprises of six chapters which mainly deal about people problems, what makes a good hire and how employee's behavior can impact productivity. This section comprises of advice about recruitment, interviews, spotting talents and bewares of `bad eggs' etc. Marketing section is the largest, constitutes nine chapters on marketing strategy and communication. This is followed by Sales section which is essentially about contemporary sales techniques and concepts for the software market. There are lots of ideas in the book, some of which I don't necessarily agree with. Nevertheless, it makes a very good reading written from a developer turned manager prospect who has been working in the industry for quite some time, in the industry where we count time in dog years. An interesting thing I noted in contrast with Joel Spolsky was that Eric doesn't credit higher education towards innovation as much as Joel does, but then again if you'll look at the portfolio of these experts in their particular genre, the reason will become obvious.

The writing is simple and easy to understand.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Giuseppe on December 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
I have to be honest, if I had read this book before I started the adventure where I am involved I probably never was jumping in this boat and start to row. Anyway here I am and I will use the knowledge in a wise way.

This book is excellent to understand how to start on your own, and not die during the effort. I will say this book brings really good advice to any developer that wants to be more than a Coder. The concept goes for Developers that wants to go in the ISV world, but i will say this is a handbook to Developers that want to understand how to create successful projects, it doesn't matter if its for your own clients, your own product, or working for someone else.

I have to say Thank You to the Author.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Hadar Pedhazur on April 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
I've known Eric Sink for 7 years now, having met him at a Linux trade show in 1999. He has always been an excellent communicator, and this book exemplifies that. In addition to clarity, he is incredibly insightful and able to impart that insight to the rest of us.

This book should appeal to anyone in the technology industry (at all ends of the spectrum), even though it is "aimed" at people who want to start or are running a small-sized software company.

If you want to learn, at the same time as having some extremely hearty laughs, then I highly recommend this book!
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Eric Sink on the Business of Software (Expert's Voice)
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