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Eric Clapton Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, Import


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Audio CD, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, February 27, 2007
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Eric Clapton has often stated that JJ Cale is one of the single most important figures in rock history, a sentiment echoed by many of his fellow musicians. Cale’s influence on Clapton was profound, and his influence on many more of today’s artists cannot be overstated. To honor JJ’s legacy, a year after his passing, Clapton gathered a group of like-minded friends and ... Read more in Amazon's Eric Clapton Store

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 27, 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, Import
  • Label: Imports
  • ASIN: B000002G85
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,201 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Slunky
2. Bad Boy
3. Lonesome And A Long Way From Home
4. After Midnight
5. Easy Now
6. Blues Power
7. Bottle Of Red Wine
8. Lovin' You Lovin' Me
9. I've Told You For The Last Time
10. Don't Know Why
11. Let It Rain

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Out of print in the U.S.! Digitally remasterd reissue of Slowhand's first solo album, originally released in 1970. This album found Clapton establishing his own style as vocalist and songwriter instead of the 'Guitar God' he had been labeled as since his days with John Mayall, the Yardbirds and Cream. Thankfully, he managed to retain that nickname and forge his own style. Features musical assistance from Delaney Bramlett, Bobby Whitlock, Bobby Keys, Leon Russell, Jim Gordon and others. 11 tracks. Universal.

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The album that launched Clapton's solo career takes most of its cues from his then-recent collaboration with Delaney and Bonnie. In fact, Delaney produced the album, which explains its loose, jam-session feel that sometimes finds Clapton battling against a cast that includes guest stars Stephen Stills, Sonny Curtis, Rita Coolidge, Leon Russell, and Delaney and Bonnie. Yet this is the album on which Clapton established himself as a forceful singer, and it also produced some of his most enduring classics, including "Blues Power," "After Midnight," and "Let It Rain." --Daniel Durchholz

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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See all 37 customer reviews
It also great lesser known songs, no fillers.
M. Scagnelli
THIS IS THE BEST CLAPTON ALBUM EVER and i've followed him since cream, past phil collins and even to babyface.
James J. Dever
This album is the most unique Clapton work ever.
James

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By the dirty mac on August 15, 2002
Format: Audio CD
After the demise of Blind Faith, Eric Clapton did a concert tour with Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett. He wrote several songs with Bonnie Bramlett in late 1969 and early 1970, which formed the basis of this, his first solo album. "Blues Power," "Let It Rain," and "After Midnight" all rank among Clapton classics. (Clapton's CROSSROADS box set has an exciting alternate version of "After Midnight," featuring a more extensive horn section and more reverb on the guitar solo.) The acoustic ballad "Easy Now" is the best of the deeper album tracks. The rest of the filler is playful and fun, if ultimately a little monotonous; it's difficult to distinguish tracks such as "Bad Boy," "Lovin' You Lovin' Me," and "I've Told You for the Last Time" from each other several minutes after hearing them.
Here is an unabashed pop album from the man who quit the Yardbirds years earlier because he thought they were too much of a pop band. EC broadened his horizons by incorporating pop, country and even gospel elements into his sound, which was nice to see. Maybe he wanted to prove that there was more to him than the blues rock that defined him in the 1960s. On the other hand, there are times on this album when a sizzling guitar solo would have been exactly what the doctor ordered. Fans who yearned for the old Clapton would have to wait several months for him to release LAYLA with Derek & the Dominos near the end of 1970. But the more laid back Clapton that most people recognize today can be traced directly to this album.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. Scagnelli on April 23, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Eric Clapton's debut album as a solo artist is one of his best albums ever. It has the hits that are great, such as After Midnight, Blues Power, and Let It Rain. It also great lesser known songs, no fillers. Some of these are Bad Boy, Lonesome and a Long Way From Home, and Lovin' You Lovin' Me. All the songs are great. This album is what Clapton is all about. Buy It.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By G. J Wiener on January 7, 2001
Format: Audio CD
This debut Eric Clapton has some blues rock but deviates into other styles. Easy Now is one pretty acoustic ballad and Eric gives one of his best vocal performances. The lyrics are pretty hip with the time it was recorded too. The female background vocalists add a special touch on several tracks most notably Lonesome andBottle Of Red Wine. However the real meat and potatoes songs are Blues Power, Bad Boy, After Midnight, and Let It Rain. They really rock with a passion as Eric's vocals really touch the soul. Do not overlook this recording.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By finulanu on April 29, 2007
Format: Audio CD
This is a pretty okay album, actually. Crisp, professional, laid back blues-rock that occasionally courts brilliance. Let It Rain is a good example of that. Only a guitarist of Clapton's calibur could've played that kind of solo. Of course there's also his hit cover of J.J. Cale's After Midnight, a fun Mardi Gras-R&B hybrid, and the live favorite Blues Power. Those three are the album's strongest points by far, but there are some other goodies too: the horn-powered, funky Slunky; blues-pop on Bad Boy, and folk-blues on Lonesome and a Long Way from Home (a clear ancestor of 461 Ocean Blvd.'s Give Me Strength). And Clapton had a hand in most of the songwriting too, which is cool by me. A couple downsides, though. The lyrics are weak - Clapton never was much of a poet in the first place - and some of it is simply inconsequential pop, such as Loving Me Loving You, Easy Now, Don't Know Why and Told You for the Last Time. This laid the groundwork for Clapton's strongest studio album (461 Ocean Blvd), has its moments, and is nicely mellow (unlike some of his other solo stuff, which is annoyingly mellow). But it's not a work of genius. Then again, '70s Clapton wasn't exactly an innovator - damn good guitarist, though.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "gordon@ruraltel.net" on May 3, 2001
Format: Audio CD
This was Clapton's first solo album, and it is a fine record. During Blind Faith's one and only tour, Clapton got friendly with the group that was opening for Blind Faith, Delaney & Bonnie & Friends, and it is this group of musicians that work on this album. Also, Delaney co-wrote many of the songs with Clapton. What results is a mix of southern-fried rockers (courtesy of Delaney's influence) and great pop tunes (Let It Rain, Easy Now). The blues is virtually nowhere in sight, but that's OK, because the musicanship is awesome, the songs are strong, and the production is OK. A bit short of true classic, hence the four star rating, but this album is a keeper. Clapton stole the rhythm section from this band (Carl Radle, Jim Gordon and Bobby Whitlock) to form Derek & the Dominoes. One listen to this album will tell you why.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Docendo Discimus on August 5, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Eric Clapton is surrounded by a cornucopia of musicians and vocalist on this his first solo album.

Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett, Stephen Stills, Rita Coolidge, Bobby Whitlock, Jim Gordon, Carl Radle, Leon Russell and several more lend a hand or two, and Clapton has co-written about half of the album's eleven songs with Bonnie Bramlett, the half-decent instrumental "Slunky" and the fine blues-rock numbers "Bad Boy" and "Bottle Of Red Wine" among them.

There is perhaps a little less pop-rock and a little more blues-rock here than on most of Clapton's seventies solo albums, and many of the songs that were to become concert standarts throughout the decade came from this album: Clapton's rendition of J.J. Cale's "After Midnight", the sturdy rockers "Blues Power" and "Bottle Of Red Wine" and the grand "Let It Rain".

Eric Clapton could have let loose a bit more when he recorded the vocals, and fans of his guitar hero persona may feel that he should have soloed a bit more and with a bit more reckless abandon, but this eponymous 37-minute album is nevertheless a nice, cohesive listen with plenty of highlights and precious few let-downs...a "cozy" album, and a sign of things to come as far as what Clapton's 70s solo career would bring.

"Eric Clapton" is not one of Clapton's better-known solo albums, but it has several good melodies and a lot of excellent musicanship, and while it doesn't reach the hights of "Layla" or "From The Cradle" it is definitely one of Clapton's better efforts.
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