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Eric Sawyer: Our American Cousin

Boston Modern Orchestra Project , Gil Rose , John Shoptaw (libretto) , Eric Sawyer , Janna Baty (mezzo-soprano) , Alan Schneider (tenor) , Aaron Engebreth (baritone) Audio CD
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Price: $26.73 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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MP3 Music, 36 Songs, 2008 $17.98  
Audio CD, 2008 $36.63  
Audio CD, 2008 $26.73  

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Prelude 6:36$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 1, A Sneeze 1:57$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 1, Arts of Theater 4:16$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 2, Harry Hawk's Substitute 1:52$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 2, Walking a Corduroy Road 4:26$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  6. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 3, Mathews and Booth 1:58$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 3, What Happens Here? 2:47$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  8. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 4, Chorus of Women 1:57$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  9. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 4, Chorus of Amputees 1:27$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen10. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 4, Chorus of Freedmen 1:14$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen11. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 4, Chorus of Nurses 1:22$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen12. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 4, Chorus of Businessmen0:45$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen13. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 5, Drinking Song 4:02$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen14. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 6, Laura Keene 3:58$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen15. Our American Cousin: Act 1, Scene 6, Emancipate Your Sorrows 3:27$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen16. Our American Cousin: Act 2, Scene 1, Father and Daughter 3:57$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen17. Our American Cousin: Act 2, Scene 1, I Feel a Draft 2:06$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen18. Our American Cousin: Act 2, Scene 1, Asa's Letter 4:20$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen19. Our American Cousin: Act 2, Scene 2, A Moneyed Man 5:20$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen20. Our American Cousin: Act 2, Scene 3, Introductions 1:43$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen21. Our American Cousin: Act 2, Scene 3, Possum Herding 3:02$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen22. Our American Cousin: Act 2, Scene 3, Lincoln 4:17$0.99  Buy MP3 


Disc 2:

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. Our American Cousin: Act 2, Scene 4, In the Library 3:42$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Our American Cousin: Act 2, Scene 4, Two Letters 2:37$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Our American Cousin: Act 2, Scene 5, Musical Chairs 6:29$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 1, In the Dairy 2:31$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 1, Ancient Business 5:34$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  6. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 1, Mary and Abraham 2:40$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 1, Sic Semper Booth 2:52$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  8. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 2, Assassination 7:34$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  9. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 3, The Presidential Box 9:17$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen10. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 4, Hawk's Second Chance 2:47$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen11. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 4, Burning Letter 5:29$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen12. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 5, Blood Stains 5:09$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen13. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 5, Apparition 3:44$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen14. Our American Cousin: Act 3, Scene 5, Final Chorus 4:47$0.99  Buy MP3 


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 2, 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: BMOP/sound
  • ASIN: B0037MACIS
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #563,030 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This is a wonderful surprise. When the Editor proposed the disc, from the title I suspected it would be about the Lincoln assassination, as "Our American Cousin" was the name of the play performed that evening in Ford's Theater. But I did not know the composer, Eric Sawyer (b. 1962), nor his librettist John Shoptaw, and knew nothing of this opera, which is truly "hot off the press," having been premiered in Boston just last year. Perhaps my ignorance was a blessing, because I came into the critical process blissfully free of any preconceptions, and the freshness of this piece hit me full face.

The work explores the relation between art and life, encapsulated in the confrontation between the play (a rather trivial farce) and the tumultuous events surrounding it. It asks whether art is a respite, a genuine escape, or just an act of denial in the face of life's demands and tragedies. To its credit, it doesn't provide any easy answers. Indeed, I'd like at the start to cite Shoptaw's libretto as one of the most original and substantive I've encountered in years. There are elements of historical realism, personal confession and soliloquy, surrealistic dream, and the "play within a play." The work avoids easy categorization, and at the end I felt I'd encountered something both light and substantive, an admirable combination.

Sawyer's music is essentially conservative, but it never panders to easy evocations of the past or facile pastiche. Indeed, I'd say it's "Ivesian" in its practice of combining elements of traditional and modern, historical and contemporary, popular and classical. But it's also beautifully crafted, with a restraint that partakes as much of American neo-Classicism as the wilder Ivesian ride.

Over its three acts my interest never lagged. Though one knows the ending, how its creators will structure the tale is always intriguing and leads us on. After pre-performance backstage activities in the first act, the second takes us (like the historical audience) so deep into the play it's easy to forget what is about to happen. And of course the third act creates the splintering of realities in the face of unsupportable horror...

...In fact, this is one of the freshest, most ambitious new American operas I've heard in ages. Instead of taking up once again some cinematic or literary retread, it actually dares to use original material. And it also dares to take up historical events and musical tropes without succumbing to mere costume drama. The above criticism aside, I appreciate, admire, and enjoy Sawyer's voice. And I hope this is only the first of Shoptaw's librettos. As a first collaboration, the result is stunning.

Again, outstanding performances by the Boston Modern Orchestra Project. And the enunciation of the singers is so clear that one can truly enjoy the piece without one's head buried in the booklet (itself beautifully produced, by the way, with essays by the composer, librettist, and Klára Móricz). This comes with a very high recommendation to a wide audience.

- Robert Carl --Fanfare

This is a wonderful surprise. When the Editor proposed the disc, from the title I suspected it would be about the Lincoln assassination, as "Our American Cousin" was the name of the play performed that evening in Ford's Theater. But I did not know the composer, Eric Sawyer (b. 1962), nor his librettist John Shoptaw, and knew nothing of this opera, which is truly "hot off the press," having been premiered in Boston just last year. Perhaps my ignorance was a blessing, because I came into the critical process blissfully free of any preconceptions, and the freshness of this piece hit me full face.

The work explores the relation between art and life, encapsulated in the confrontation between the play (a rather trivial farce) and the tumultuous events surrounding it. It asks whether art is a respite, a genuine escape, or just an act of denial in the face of life's demands and tragedies. To its credit, it doesn't provide any easy answers. Indeed, I'd like at the start to cite Shoptaw's libretto as one of the most original and substantive I've encountered in years. There are elements of historical realism, personal confession and soliloquy, surrealistic dream, and the "play within a play." The work avoids easy categorization, and at the end I felt I'd encountered something both light and substantive, an admirable combination.

Sawyer's music is essentially conservative, but it never panders to easy evocations of the past or facile pastiche. Indeed, I'd say it's "Ivesian" in its practice of combining elements of traditional and modern, historical and contemporary, popular and classical. But it's also beautifully crafted, with a restraint that partakes as much of American neo-Classicism as the wilder Ivesian ride.

Over its three acts my interest never lagged. Though one knows the ending, how its creators will structure the tale is always intriguing and leads us on. After pre-performance backstage activities in the first act, the second takes us (like the historical audience) so deep into the play it's easy to forget what is about to happen. And of course the third act creates the splintering of realities in the face of unsupportable horror...

...In fact, this is one of the freshest, most ambitious new American operas I've heard in ages. Instead of taking up once again some cinematic or literary retread, it actually dares to use original material. And it also dares to take up historical events and musical tropes without succumbing to mere costume drama. The above criticism aside, I appreciate, admire, and enjoy Sawyer's voice. And I hope this is only the first of Shoptaw's librettos. As a first collaboration, the result is stunning.

Again, outstanding performances by the Boston Modern Orchestra Project. And the enunciation of the singers is so clear that one can truly enjoy the piece without one's head buried in the booklet (itself beautifully produced, by the way, with essays by the composer, librettist, and Klára Móricz). This comes with a very high recommendation to a wide audience.

- Robert Carl --Fanfare

This is a wonderful surprise. When the Editor proposed the disc, from the title I suspected it would be about the Lincoln assassination, as "Our American Cousin" was the name of the play performed that evening in Ford's Theater. But I did not know the composer, Eric Sawyer (b. 1962), nor his librettist John Shoptaw, and knew nothing of this opera, which is truly "hot off the press," having been premiered in Boston just last year. Perhaps my ignorance was a blessing, because I came into the critical process blissfully free of any preconceptions, and the freshness of this piece hit me full face.

The work explores the relation between art and life, encapsulated in the confrontation between the play (a rather trivial farce) and the tumultuous events surrounding it. It asks whether art is a respite, a genuine escape, or just an act of denial in the face of life's demands and tragedies. To its credit, it doesn't provide any easy answers. Indeed, I'd like at the start to cite Shoptaw's libretto as one of the most original and substantive I've encountered in years. There are elements of historical realism, personal confession and soliloquy, surrealistic dream, and the "play within a play." The work avoids easy categorization, and at the end I felt I'd encountered something both light and substantive, an admirable combination.

Sawyer's music is essentially conservative, but it never panders to easy evocations of the past or facile pastiche. Indeed, I'd say it's "Ivesian" in its practice of combining elements of traditional and modern, historical and contemporary, popular and classical. But it's also beautifully crafted, with a restraint that partakes as much of American neo-Classicism as the wilder Ivesian ride.

Over its three acts my interest never lagged. Though one knows the ending, how its creators will structure the tale is always intriguing and leads us on. After pre-performance backstage activities in the first act, the second takes us (like the historical audience) so deep into the play it's easy to forget what is about to happen. And of course the third act creates the splintering of realities in the face of unsupportable horror...

...In fact, this is one of the freshest, most ambitious new American operas I've heard in ages. Instead of taking up once again some cinematic or literary retread, it actually dares to use original material. And it also dares to take up historical events and musical tropes without succumbing to mere costume drama. The above criticism aside, I appreciate, admire, and enjoy Sawyer's voice. And I hope this is only the first of Shoptaw's librettos. As a first collaboration, the result is stunning.

Again, outstanding performances by the Boston Modern Orchestra Project. And the enunciation of the singers is so clear that one can truly enjoy the piece without one's head buried in the booklet (itself beautifully produced, by the way, with essays by the composer, librettist, and Klára Móricz). This comes with a very high recommendation to a wide audience.

- Robert Carl --Fanfare


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3.0 out of 5 stars More from the BMO March 11, 2013
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I love the BMO for taking on seldom heard works and giving them a top notch performance the majority of the time. The booklets are always informative and as always they have sparked my interest in a new composer. Worth hearing and I plan on checking out more Sawyer. Modern composers deserve our support!
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