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Erotic Wars: What Happened to the Sexual Revolution? Paperback – May, 1991


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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Despite the supposed new freedoms of the sexual revolution, many women still feel they are "giving in" by having sex with a prospective boyfriend, according to Rubin. In our culture, she claims, gender-based power struggles and inequality continue to mark the meeting between the sexes, with women still expected to play the role of compliant caregivers, and men equating sexual conquest with masculine identity. Rubin ( Intimate Strangers ) interviewed 375 adults and teenagers for this revealing, sensitive probe, supplementing that data with 600 additional questionnaire responses. Among her findings: "Neither men nor women are terribly satisfied with the other in bed"; adolescents are highly tolerant of all types of sexual behavior; pornography has increasingly found its way into the lives of the "respectable"; despite lip service paid to fear of AIDS, teens aren't using condoms.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Rubin looks at the sexual revolution and its interrelationship with the concurrent gender and psychological revolutions, focusing on heterosexual behavior and attitudes toward personal sexual behavior. With information from in-depth interviews and questionnaires on the intimate details of sexual behavior of adults and teenagers, Rubin confirms the widening margin of acceptability in sexual behavior, the continuing association of virginity with the value of women, and the positive movement toward finding more lasting satisfaction in relationships. This is a readable, interesting work for the general public, but because Rubin does not detail the specifics of her research, her findings and conclusions demand close scrutiny by researchers. --Jeris Cassel, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, N.J.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 207 pages
  • Publisher: Harpercollins (May 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060965649
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060965648
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.3 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,309,283 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
It is a crime that this book appear to be out of print. This is a super-smart book about heterosexual men and women who came of age in the 1960s and 1970s (fyi: I was born in 1982) and how they dealt with the "sexual revolution" and its fallout. This is a sensitive, thoughtful work of cultural history, based on interviews with real people who went through a particular era and reflect thoughtfully on it. This is an invaluable document of a particular historical moment that was challenging for straight women and men in different - but obviously connected - ways, i.e. ladies being all, "Yay, my orgasms are now being recognized as important/necessary" and dudes being all, "This is confusing and difficult because I was never acculturated/taught to deal with women's actual sexual needs/anatomy." Fascinating, humane, indispensable as a historical account of how real people lived, loved, and suffered. As an overly - credentialed academic I'll say that Rubin's contributions (in various fields) have not been adequately recognized.
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