Escape From Childhood: The Needs and Rights of Children and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Escape from Childhood Paperback – September 1, 1996


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, September 1, 1996
$55.00
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Back%20to%20School%20for%20Teachers


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Teacher Supplies
Browse our Teacher Supplies store, with everything teachers need to educate students and expand their learning.

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Holt Associates (September 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0913677043
  • ISBN-13: 978-0913677049
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,468,747 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
16
4 star
4
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 23 customer reviews
When it comes to childrens rights this wonderful being is right on target!
Earth Goddess
It seems that there has been a reaction even to this mildest and most reasonable of reforms.
othoniaboys
Even before I read this book, I had made many of the conclusions the author makes.
Kendra Morgan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By M. Fletcher on July 14, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is my favorite book of the many Holt has written. It does not cover any aspects of learning/educational issues as do his other books. Instead it addresses the matter of looking at children as whole individuals who should be treated respectably, as any adult would want to be.
Our culture too readily encourages parents, and adults in general, to use their voice in a excessively authorative manner which only serves to bully and demean children. No one would want to be spoken to or treated in such a condensending manner. This book will open your eyes to the damage we are doing to our beloved kids when we accept the cultural standard way of parenting. Highly recommended!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 9, 1998
Format: Paperback
When I first heard of John Holt I was given a quotation and a comment. The quotation was from 'Escape from Childhood' page 1: "I propose...that the rights, privileges, duties of adult citizens be made available to any young person, of whatever age, who wants to make use of them." The accompanying comment was that Holt's work can be taken as a charter for paedophiles. I disagree. Unless I missed something fundamental I found Holt a progressive thinker who argued for the removal of the taboos which led young peole into sexual ignorance and often tragic experimentation. He was ahead of his time. Nowadays we're all aware of the importance of sexual education for the young. Twenty years ago such thinking was anathemna to many, though not Mr Holt. More generally this book is a first class discussion of rights and responsibilities, and it will offer anyone a useful light with which they can explore this academic minefield further. For Holt the escape from childhood is as much about acknowledging the responsibilities of the young as it is about acknowledging their rights. As he says, "If we gave up our vested interest in children's dependency and incompetence - would they not much more quickly become independent and competent? We ought to give it a try." He could be right. The 190 (out of 192) countries who have signed up to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child should all listen up and read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Dandylioness on August 14, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Most discussion of what passes as "children's rights" today seems to fall into two categories. One is what I think of as the bare minimum of rights: the child's right not to be beaten or molested. The second uses the term as a euphemisim for parental rights: who gets them in a custody battle and when the state is justified in revoking them. Holt's thoughtful book is revolutionary because it does not fall into one of these categories. Instead Holt argues that children are not the property of their parents or the state, that they are human in their own right, and that they deserve all of the rights adult citizens already have. In the first few chapters Holt examines the current state of childhood in the West. In the second half of the book he details specific social, economic, political, and educational rights he argues children should have, and suggests how society might have to change to accomodate these rights.

On the whole, Holt presents an argument profoundly sensitive to the plight of children without ever letting himself or his readers descend into sentimentality. My criticisms of the work, were I to list them, would be mostly technical in nature. With post-Columbine hysteria steadily turning schools more and more prison-like and innovations like the V-chip and Internet filters increasing in popularity, _Escape_ is just as relevant today as it was in 1974, if not more so. It's shameful that books like this are so difficult to find and so often out of print.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 27, 2003
Format: Hardcover
The New York Times called this book "astonishly cogent," and I agree. This is one of the most insightful and thought-provoking books I've ever read. Sadly, 30 years later almost nothing has changed. While the ACLU fights for the voting rights of convicted felons, a 17-year-old "child," no matter how sensible or informed, cannot cast a ballot in the United States. Millions of children are shipped off to school every day, where they are mostly taught to do as they're told (no matter how arbitrary or pointless) and above all, conform--lessons which will serve them all too well for decades to come. The transparency of Holt's writing should also be an example to authors everywhere. It is a tragedy that this book is out of print, and Holt no longer with us. The world desperately needs more like him.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 9, 1998
Format: Paperback
When I first heard of John Holt I was given a quotation and a comment. The quotation was from 'Escape from Childhood' page 1: "I propose...that the rights, privileges, duties of adult citizens be made available to any young person, of whatever age, who wants to make use of them." The accompanying comment was that Holt's work can be taken as a charter for paedophiles. I disagree. Unless I missed something fundamental I found Holt a progressive thinker who argued for the removal of the taboos which led young peole into sexual ignorance and often tragic experimentation. He was ahead of his time. Nowadays we're all aware of the importance of sexual education for the young. Twenty years ago such thinking was anathemna to many, though not Mr Holt. More generally this book is a first class discussion of rights and responsibilities, and it will offer anyone a useful light with which they can explore this academic minefield further. For Holt the escape from childhood is as much about acknowledging the responsibilities of the young as it is about acknowledging their rights. As he says, "If we gave up our vested interest in children's dependency and incompetence - would they not much more quickly become independent and competent? We ought to give it a try." He could be right. The 190 (out of 192) countries who have signed up to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child should all listen up and read.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?