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An Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision Paperback – December 1, 2008


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An Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision + An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding (Oxford World's Classics) + Descartes: Selected Philosophical Writings
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 60 pages
  • Publisher: Cosimo Classics (December 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1605204420
  • ISBN-13: 978-1605204420
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 0.1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,848,866 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By noeton on February 22, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a small press' take on this classic work. The cover is the nicest looking part. There is a paragraph summary in typewriter set, or maybe old courier, that looks cheap. But the essay itself looks ok. Really not a bad book, and one who wants this work has to make choices, since there is no decent edition of Berkeley's works. There is zero critical material in this adequate, if overpriced, reprint.

Bishop George Berkeley is the paradigm 'idealist,' and is perhaps the 'whipping boy' of philosophy, but is a remarkably ingenious and overlooked figure who took naive perceptual consciousness to its limits, setting the stage for Hume. His theory of vision paved the way for his critique of Lockean empiricism.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Book Lover on December 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
George Berkeley (March 12, 1685 - January 14, 1753), also known as Bishop Berkeley, was an influential Irish philosopher whose primary philosophical achievement is the advancement of what has come to be called subjective idealism, summed up in his dictum, "Esse est percipi" ("To be is to be perceived"). Basically, the theory is that we can only directly know sensations and ideas of objects, not abstractions such as "matter". He wrote a number of works, the most widely-read of which are his Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (1710) and Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (1713) (Philonous, the "lover of the mind", representing Berkeley himself). In 1734 he published The Analyst, a critique of the foundations of science, which was very influential in the subsequent development of mathematics.

The city of Berkeley, California is named after him.
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