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Essential Avengers, Vol. 3 (Marvel Essentials) Paperback – November 3, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 568 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel; First Edition edition (November 3, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785107878
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785107873
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 6.7 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #752,840 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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See all 17 customer reviews
If you can afford it - wait for a more expensive colour reprint edition to really appreciate the Avengers in their true glory.
G. YEO
So whether you are a youngster who is new to these older comics, or an older person 40cough like myself, these Marvel books are brilliant buys.
S J Buck
This duo is one of the greatest in comics lore... and even demi-gods Barry [Windsor] Smith and Gene Colan show up to help out on art.
Dave Huber

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dave Huber on March 28, 2002
Format: Paperback
Easily the best volume of the three Avengers Essentials to date, we now see Rascally Roy Thomas at the scripting helm, along with Awesome John Buscema doing most of the art chores. Say no more! This duo is one of the greatest in comics lore... and even demi-gods Barry [Windsor] Smith and Gene Colan show up to help out on art.
This collection contains the spectacular introduction of the Vision, the Avengers vs. the (old) X-Men, several battles with arch-foe Ultron, and the classic Avengers vs. Avengers thanks to the machinations of the time-spanning Scarlet Centurion. I'd give this compilation five stars, but the several issues featuring Hercules and the battles in god-ville are just plain dull. (Avengers #50 featured this crap? YEESH.) But don't let these few pages spoil the rest of the great fun.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 16, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Volume 3 of "The Essential Avengers" is where the Marvel superhero group finally starts to grow up. Part of the reason is because John Buscema became the resident artist (through issue #62), marking the first time that the artwork was a strong selling point, but the more important reason was that the group finally came up with an original group member with the Vision. At that point the group really crystalized for me, so scripter Roy Thomas gets a big part of the credit.
This trade paperback collects issues #47-68 of "The Avengers," along with Annual #2. I first seriously started reading "The Avengers" with issue #53, which is where the Avengers battled the X-Men, who were my favorite Marvel group in the Sixties. At that point the lineup for the Avengers had, once again, changed. At that point it was Golaith, the Wasp, Hawkeye, and the Black Panther. Getting rid of Hercules and the mutant tag team of Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch was a good move, although I can never really think of it as the Avengers unless Captain America is in charge (he bolts in the first issue here). But I never liked Hawkeye and thought making him the new Giant-Man and making Goliath into Yellowjacket, was ill-advised. The only reason I kept reading the book was because of the Vision, so that even when other Marvel superheroes who were incapable of sustaining their own books (e.g., the Black Knight) joined up it was the android that held my attention. .
The Vision first popped up in issue #57, created by Ultron-5 to defeat the Avengers. Instead, he became their most interesting member, although it would be a while before the whole backstory on his creation came to be. At this point the idea that he was "an android...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mark A. Domeier on December 7, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While the cover is a little misleading (Captain America, Iron Man, and Thor are hardly in this volume), Volume 3 of the Essential Avengers is still very good. This is not my favorite group of Avengers (Goliath/Yellowjacket, Hawkeye/Goliath, Wasp, Black Panther, and the Vision), but Roy Thomas does a great job of making the reader care about the characters, especially the Vision.
It's interesting to see the first appearances of Ultron, who is one of the ultimate bad guys in the Marvel Universe, and his creation in the Vision. It's also unique that the Black Panther has to occasionally deal with issues in his homeland. The great thing about the Avengers is that members come and go and have their own lives to deal with too, which is why Cap, Iron Man, and Thor aren't around much.
The art, as mentioned in other reviews, is excellent. John Buscema is the definitive Avengers artist. Throw in Gene Colan and some early Barry Windsor, and this is a very good group of stories to read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Inkstained Wretch on August 4, 2011
Format: Paperback
The awkward truth for fans of the Avengers is that the series stumbled about for its first few years due to ho-hum stories, journeyman art and unexciting character lineups. It wasn't really until the stories collected in this volume that the series began to find its focus and emerge as one of the best comics of its era.

This is the run where John Buscema came into his own as an artist, giving the stories a bolder, more dramatic look. Equally outstanding work is done by Gene Colan and Barry Windsor-Smith on fill-in issues.

At the same time writer Roy Thomas returns to the original idea of the team being earth's greatest heroes and gives them sizable menaces to fight like a reformed Masters of Evil and the renegade robot Ultron. He also reshuffles the line-up, bringing back Thor and Iron Man, adding the Black Panther and the Vision and reinventing two long-standing characters, Goliath and Hawkeye, as respectively Yellowjacket and the new Goliath. The result is a much more interesting collection of heroes and one that you could really expect to save the world from crisis after crisis.

In short it is just pure comic book fun. I give it four stars only because it took a little while to get going.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By goldenrulecomics on March 6, 2011
Format: Paperback
This collection of the Avengers starts slowly but finishes very, very strongly. The book brings together issues 47-68 as well Avengers Annual No. 2, and while Roy Thomas is the writer for the entire run he really only hits his stride with issue No. 52 with the addition of the Black Panther. From that issue to No. 68 is as strong a run of comics that you're going to find from that time period: A crossover with the X-Men; Bucky's death revisited; the introduction of the Vision and Yellowjacket; the marriage of the Pyms; Hawkeye becoming Goliath; and several run-ins with Ultron. Throw in a few guest appearances of the Black Knight and Dr. Strange as well as a fight with the original Avengers. Wow!
On minor quibble -- I think it would have been good to have included the first part of the X-Men crossover, which appeared in the X-Men series.
The collection is also blessed with art for most of the issues from John Buscema, who offers strong clean lines that add to the story (rather than detract, as so many of the artists of the 1990s and 2000s have done). Two issues are by the great Gene Colan, and there's even a few early issues by a young Barry Windsor-Smith.
There are some readers who don't consider these comic collections ''essential'' because they are black-and-white, rather than color. And there is some truth to that. The Windsor-Smith issues in particular are much more dramatic in color, but that isn't a sufficient reason not to recommend this collection for those who can't afford the originals or, like me, don't want to keep pulling their original copies out their plastic bags to reread. For more on the book, see my fuller review on squidoo under my name goldenrulecomics.
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