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Essential Iron Man, Vol. 1 (Marvel Essentials) Paperback – October 24, 2007


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Grade Level: 4 and up
  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel (October 24, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785118608
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785118602
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,354,447 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mark A. Domeier on November 1, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Iron Man has not been one of my favorite Marvel characters, but it was interesting to see more of his early appearances. With the short stories as they appeared in Tales of Suspense, character development is limited, and there is a lot of repetition from story to story ("If only they knew their indifferent boss is really Iron Man!" "If only I could tell Pepper how I really feel about her!" "If I can't get my chestplate plugged in, my heart will fail!"). I have a feeling when the stories get full-length, they'll be better. It will be interesting to see how they re-develop his origin in the upcoming live-action movie.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By F. Michael Ciletti on June 22, 2008
Format: Paperback
This early Iron Man stuff probably needs two reviews to do an honest job. Old-time comic fans will appreciate this collection of these early stories and the introductions of so many classic Iron Man enemies. The 1960s writing is a nice bit of nostalgia, and the art by people like Steve Ditko and Don Heck is very fun to look at.

But to a younger person, perhaps coming to Iron Man from seeing the movie...not so much. The stories and enemies will seem hokey and the "red menace" stuff will lack the meaning it had to people my age who lived through the Cold War.

I love the marvel essentials series, but let's face it...these are pieces of nostalgia. Early marvels were pretty poorly written stuff. Once Stan Lee established the formula of a hero who whined and carped about his personal life all the time, it became formulaic very quickly. These stories fit in that mold, 18 pages of fighting some communist and a few panels of Stark whining about the metal plate on his chest.

If you understand what you are getting this is a great inexpensive way to grab all these early Iron Man comics...but I wouldn't buy it for a kid.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Hal Jordan VINE VOICE on June 24, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Returning to these stores after 40 years, I have to say I found them rather disappointing. The Iron Man idea was great, but many of the early stories are quite weak and not much thought seems to have been given to fleshing out the character or giving him a supporting cast. An indication that Stan Lee and company didn't much know what to do with the character is the story reprinted from Tales of Suspense 44 in which Iron Man goes back in time to save Cleopatra from an evil pharoh. This was obviously an attempt to cash in on the publicity surrounding the film Cleopatra that was released that year. The result was a story that makes little or no sense. Not until TOS 45 did they bother to provide Iron Man with any supporting cast -- the not very memorable or interesting Pepper Potts and Happy Hogan. For those getting back into Silver Age Marvels -- or encountering them for the first time -- I would recommend either the Fantastic Four or Spiderman. Those stories have aged much better than these Iron Man stories.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Critic's Corner by Scotman VINE VOICE on April 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
Essential Iron-Man Volume 1

For those of you who have no clue who Stan Lee is (and yes, there are people like this, as shocking as that may seem), you would do well to read the early adventures of Iron-Man from the 1960s, written by Stan Lee, art by Don Heck, Jack Kirby and other great artists, in this compilation Essential.

The Essentials are reprint books that are black & white reproductions of the early stories of these superheroes. This is a cheap way to get the style of writing and the art of the time, read some exciting graphic storytelling and take a peek at the history of Marvel Comics.

This is a collection of Iron-Man's first appearance in Tales of Suspense 39 and goes to issue number 72

Since these are from the sixties and mostly boys were reading these issues, there's bound to be some sexist writing. Example, Iron-Man is told by his girlfriend (while as Tony Stark, millionaire playboy) that Iron-Man would look great painted gold "so his appearance matches his golden deeds!"

Stark later paints his costume gold and remarks, "Wow, what a difference! Leave it to a woman to figure out an attractive appearance!" Oh boy!

Meet Gargantus the Giant One, or stories about Soviet spies. Meet Kruschev, and sneaky Pentagon plots against the USSR. Kirby's art in Kala, Queen of the Netherworld is very cool. The man knew how to draw villianous women. Slinky!

Marvel prided itself on writing real life stories intermixed with the superhero'ing, and these issues are no exception. Pepper Potts follows Tony around wherever he goes. "How can such a walking dreamboat be such a hard-headed boss??"

And my favorite villain, The Mandarin, as only Don Heck can draw him.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By lisaokapi on May 1, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
So, I've just finished reading the massive first volume of the Essential Iron Man series. The book itself is really neat in that it gives you all the story of those old, hard to find, expensive issues while paying only $10-$15 for the entire book. It is printed in black and white which is a bummer but, with the old-style feel of the comics themselves, it kind of adds to the vintage feel of it. This TPB (Trade Paperback) covers Tales of Suspense #39-72. It starts with the debut issue of Iron Man and continues through his adventures until the last issues in battle with Titanium Man. The stories are Saturday-morning cartoon-ish in that it basically involves Tony Stark in his efforts to stop the villain of the week from destroying his factory or from killing the hostages. There's also a wonderful love triangle between Tony, Pepper, his secretary, and Happy, his bodyguard. The action is pretty cool with Tony's transistor-powered iron suit of armor seeing combat in just about every issue. The villains range from awesome to horrible. Some neat ones that weren't seen all that much were the Commie defector Vanko and his Crimson Dynamo armor, the Black Knight, and Jack Frost. Some horrible mentions are Mr. Doll, the Melter, and the Phantom. The dialogue is something to get used to if you started yourself on more recent comics but it's all good 60's fun. The story's also a bit silly in that, despite all the times Tony ducks into a room and dons his Iron Man suit, no one has put together that Stark and Iron Man are in fact one in the same, despite Tony barely being able to conceal his identity almost every time he has to make a costume change.Read more ›
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More About the Author

Stan Lee is a man who needs no introduction. Nevertheless: Having begun his career with wartime Timely Comics and staying the course throughout the Atlas era, Stan the Man made comic-book history with Fantastic Four #1, harbinger of a bold new perspective in story writing that endures to this day. With some of the industry's greatest artists, he introduced hero after hero in Incredible Hulk, Amazing Spider-Man, X-Men and more -- forming a shared universe for rival publishers to measure themselves against. After an almost literal lifetime of writing and editing, Lee entered new entertainment fields and earned Marvel one opportunity after another. He remains one of Marvel's best-known public representatives.

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