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Eternal Idol Import


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Music

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Biography

Black Sabbath is credited with creating heavy metal. The success of their first two albums - Black Sabbath and Paranoid - marked a paradigm shift in the world of rock. Not until Black Sabbath upended the music scene did the term “heavy metal” enter the popular vocabulary to describe the denser, more thunderous offshoot of rock over which they presided.

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Frequently Bought Together

Eternal Idol + Born Again + Seventh Star
Price for all three: $44.09

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 2, 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Sanctuary UK
  • ASIN: B004222UC8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #34,132 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Digitally remastered and expanded edition of this 1987 album including two bonus tracks on Disc One plus the complete album session originally recorded by the late Ray Gillen on Disc Two. The Eternal Idol, Sabbath's 13th studio album, was an altogether harder sounding record and brought back an `edge' that had been missing from Seventh Star. Whilst there was much for the Sabbath fan to celebrate with tracks such as, `The Shining', `Ancient Warrior', `Born To Lose' and the title track, the album wasn't as well received and settled at number 66 in the UK and a disappointing 168 in the US. Over the years however, fans of Black Sabbath and hard rock in general have been re-discovering all that The Eternal Idol has to offer. Sanctuary.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
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4 star
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See all 36 customer reviews
Definitely worth a listen.
Matt Davis
What's cool about the deluxe edition is that it includes the Ray Gillen material, as well, as the bonus disc.
Spudsy
This is one great effort by Black Sabbath.
Todd7

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

83 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Oliverio Casas on June 3, 2010
Format: Audio CD
As much as Sharon Osbourne has made her life quest to convince the world that post-Ozzy Sabbath was completely worthless and irrelevant, we real metalheads know better than to listen to that disgusting old hag's rants.
So, after putting out two absolute classics with Dio (Heaven and Hell and The Mob Rules) and a great, but somewhat flawed album with Gillan (Born Again), the band's Butler-Iommi composing team disintegrated, leaving Black Sabbath as little more than a Tony Iommi solo showcase in 1986's Seventh Star. After this ill-fated album, the once mighty Sabbath's fate up to 1992's Dehumanizer would be a struggle between commercial obscurity and artistic irrelevancy, despite crafting a masterpiece with The Eternal Idol and two decent follow ups.
Of the five ill-fated Tony Martin albums, this is undoubtedly the best. After the softer, hard rock oriented Seventh Star, the band feels rejuvenated and hell bent on recapturing their long lost heavy metal thunder.
Despite a hodgepodge of backing musicians and personel problems during the album's production, Tony Iommi's monumentally heavy riffing, coupled with Tony Martin's Dio-esque vocals on tracks like Hard Life to Love, Glory Ride, and Born to Lose manage to keep the music focused, hard and heavy. Geoff Nicholls, Sabbath's perpetually invisible fifth member, does an excellent job throghout with his eery, atmospheric keyboards, especially on The Eternal Idol and Ancient Warrior. That said, the absolute masterpiece on this album is The Shining, a monumental Sabbath stomper that deserves a place in the band's greatest songs pantheon.
Make no mistake. Tony Iommi is, was and will always be Black Sabbath's dark soul regardless on who's handling the vocals, and despite this being the band's most underrated opus, it still stands as an all-time heavy metal masterpiece and a monument to the left-handed riffmaster's musical vision.
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38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By A. DeGaetano on November 3, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I've reviewed this album under the regular listing for "Eternal Idol." However, the deluxe editions that Sanctuary is doing in the UK are great for all collectors of Sabbath and those who are looking for something different. This is a 3 1/2 to 4 star release, but the bonus CD makes it a 5.

Not only do you get the remastered, very underrated album, but you also get a second disc that has the recording with the original vocals laid down by Ray Gillen. Gillen died a few years later from AIDS. That, along with the fact that the release with his vocals has floated around in bootleg circles for years now, makes this a heralded release in many circles. People in the know never thought it would officially see the light of day.

The recording of "Eternal Idol" is legendary insofar as the turmoil surrounding the album. With two weeks to go before its release, Gillen left the band, and Tony Martin came in and recorded over his vocals. Subsequently, Martin would sing on four more Sabbath albums.

This release is only available as an import. Rhino has done a great job in their remastering of past Sabbath albums, but these releases won't come out in the US. This, along with "Seventh Star," are a must for any Sabbath/Iommi fan.
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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By K. Buckley on November 17, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The new 2-disc Special Edition of the "The Eternal Idol" is a fascinating listening experience for anyone who is otherwise a fan of this album. First, the remastered CD of the original LP with Tony Martin on vocals has never sounded better. While not the best produced album, the remastering brings a richer and more musical sound than my original CD, that I purchased back in 1987. But the big revelation is the second disc, which includes demo verions of the originally conceived LP with Ray Gillen on vocals. Be warned that these are demos, and the mix is not polished. Nonetheless, the sound is more than adequate, and for the first time we can hear what "might have been" had Gillen not quit the band before the LP was complete, and before Tony Iommi decided to have the vocals redone by Martin.

So who is the better singer? I would say they are both very good, and about equal. But that is not the main issue in the comparison.

What's most intrigued to me is that Ray Gillen sounds less like the late, great Ronnie James Dio than did Tony Martin. Martin's voice has a slightly husky sound like Dio's, and Martin's phrasing is more Dio-like than Gillen's. Ray Gillen brought a somewhat more unique sound to his version of Black Sabbath.

Given that this album was a major commercial flop, as were all the Tony Martin Sabbath albums, it is interested to wonder if the more original vocal sound Gillen brought may have better connected with Sabbath fans that abandoned the band with this release. Personally I remember upon first listen thinking that Tony Martin sounded like a low rent version of Ronnie James Dio. I doubt I would have thought that if Gillen was singing, and I may have reacted to the LP a bit better back in 1987.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Randall Brooks on September 17, 2011
Format: Audio CD
It is so easy to get caught up in a particular era of Sabbath, and kind of 'ignore' the rest. A couple of years ago I found that the easiest way to enjoy them was to appreciate the variety of different people and talent and style the band has delivered over the span of their career. Some of the best music ever made came from that 1st 8 year period with Ozzy at the helm as vocalist; but a lot of great music came from the band on every album released after Ozzy left!

1987 was a very `difficult' year for Black Sabbath. Or, `Tony Sabbath', as critics were starting to call them. Right after starting into the "Seventh Star" tour, vocalist Glenn Hughes was fired, and Ray Gillen was brought in. Then they went into the studio to cut the new album, and Ray then split, leaving Tony Iommi no other option but to bring in Tony Martin and re-record the vocal tracks.

Well, what we have here is a very mixed result. In some way this is possibly the best Black Sabbath record yet, but in some it's the weakest. This has a lot of newer elements in it, and has a lot of Sabbath fans split down the middle about whether it should have been called Sabbath or not. Personally, I have went back and forth about it myself over the years, but always come to the same conclusion: I am SO glad that Iommi kept the Sabbath name going!! Plus it is so cool to listen to all the great singers that he worked with in the confines of the Sabbath 'family' over the years.

The songs on this are killer. Especially the title track, "The Shining", "Nightmare", "Ancient Warrior", and "Glory Ride". The acoustic "Scarlet Pimpernel" is amazing, and a great throwback to early Sabbath stuff like "Fluff" and "Laguna Sunrise". Sabbath always get stereotyped for being too 'hard'.
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This Cool
Also, check out Ray's live output on the Seventh Star Deluxe CD.
Oct 19, 2010 by J Reed |  See all 2 posts
Sabbath without Ozzy ain't Sabbath Be the first to reply
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