Ethan Frome (Oxford World's Classics) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Ethan Frome (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – November 19, 1998


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.67 $0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:



NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on the current pick, "Landline" by Rainbow Rowell.

Product Details

  • Series: Oxford World's Classics
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (November 19, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192834967
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192834966
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,441,079 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"With each volume having an introduction by an acknowledged expert, and exhaustive notes, the World's Classics are surely the most desirable series and, all-round, the best value for the money."--Oxford Times


About the Author


Elaine Showalter is Professor of English at Princeton University.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 16, 2009
Format: Paperback
Edith Wharton filled her novels with a feeling of ruin, passion and restriction. People can fall in love, but rarely do things turn out well.

But but few of even her books can evoke the feeling of "Ethan Frome," whick packs plenty of emotion, vibrancy and regrets into a short novella. While the claustrophobic feeling doesn't suit her writing well, she still spins a beautiful, horrifying story of a man facing a life without hope or joy.

It begins nearly a quarter of a century after the events of the novel, with an unnamed narrator watching middle-aged, crippled Ethan Frome drag himself to the post-office. He becomes interested in Frome's tragic past, and hears out his story.

Ethan Frome once hoped to live an urban, educated life, but ended up trapped in a bleak New England town with a hypochondriac wife, Zeena, whom he didn't love. But then his wife's cousin Mattie arrives, a bright young girl who understands Ethan far better than his wife ever tried to. Unsurprisingly, he begins to fall in love with her, but still feels an obligation to his wife.

But then Zeena threatens to send Mattie away and hire a new housekeeper, threatening the one bright spot in Ethan's dour life. Now Ethan must either rebel against the morals and strictures of his small village, or live out his life lonely. But when he and Mattie try for a third option, their affair ends in tragedy.

Wharton was always at her best when she wrote about society's strictures, morals, and love that defies that. But rather than the opulent backdrop of wealthy New York, here the setting is a bleak, snowy New England town, appropriately named Starkfield. It's a good reflection of Ethan Frome's life, and a good illustration of how the poor can be trapped.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Brent Hightower on March 23, 2013
Format: Paperback
Edith Wharton's writing style was in some ways typical of her generation - a generation with a tradition that I still have some personal connection with, and that I don't have altogether positive feelings towards. Her's was a generation that took the Mechanics of writing Seriously, at times to the exclusion of feeling, and to the exclusion of the things I always felt were the very essence and purpose of writing, the communion between human souls. Yet that is a personal thing for me, a matter of philosophy, and in no way detracts from the greatness of Ethan Frome.

This novel was one of the few I have read that had an immediate and revolutionary effect on my life, because at the time I read it I was in danger of falling into the very trap of the protagonist in the novel, Ethan Frome . . . that is, of feeling bound by honor into the web of an intolerable life, and what made life intolerable for me at the time were the very things that were crushing Ethan Frome. Namely, a cold impoverished climate, and a repressive - even cruelly vindictive - social order.

This dilemma of conscience set at odds with personal freedom and fulfillment is faced by people everywhere, yet the focus of this novel was particularly on the ways these issues affect the rural poor, and there is perhaps something uniquely desolate in the way the rural poor can come to be exiled from all hope. . . And the way I connected to this, this comunication through the generations from Edith Wharton to me, in a way that changed my life, is a direct testament (if one was needed) to the enduring power of literature; and it was also a chastening reminder to me personally of the differing and unexpected ways people's souls can reach communion.

So in summation this novel is a warning . . .
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Eddie Lee Payne on July 2, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Although a thoroughly well written and nostalgic book, the story is depressing to the uttermost. The story of a triangular love has the most ironic of endings with many unexpected and sad moments along the way. I tell my students that they need a sharp razor blade when reading the book, so that when the depression overwhelms them, they will not make a jagged cut.

Perhaps the author is giving us a glimpse into her own ultimately failed marriage as she records the quest of love by the protagonist who is married to a shrew who is a bitter woman. His awkwardness and slowness to speak to his desire adds to the suspense and to the eventual loss of opportunity.

This is a frame story, with a narrator who begins and ends the tale, being a traveler who inquires of the strange man he encountered, the one with the strange, deformed limp.

The reader will not so much ENJOY this novel as they will come to APPRECIATE its art. Edith Wharton is a master story teller, but have a DVD of a very funny comedy available to cheer you up when you finish this short novel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Celine on June 4, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I paid for this book, but never got it. I ended up getting one from my teacher. I guess I just donated money to someone...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?