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The Etruscan Cities & Rome Paperback – November 5, 1998


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press (November 5, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801860725
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801860720
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.7 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #242,154 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Rome is known to us today as a mighty empire, but it emerged slowly, and in the face of a greater regional power: namely, the combined city-states of Etruria, in what are now the Italian provinces of Tuscany and Umbria. H.H. Scullard, the late University of London classicist, offers a comprehensive view of Etruscan culture and history in this survey, originally published in 1967 and regarded as a standard work. Scullard examines the controversial question of Etruscan origins, weighing the evidence for whether the Etruscans entered Italy as a distinct ethnic group or, instead--and more likely--they evolved from elements of local and foreign cultures. He describes the rise of commercial and political centers such as Perusia, Caere, Vulci, and Veii, pointing to impressive examples of Etruscan engineering and architecture that the Romans would later emulate. Along the way he considers aspects of Etruscan ritual and material culture, including the weapons and elaborate tombs for which the Etruscans were justly famous in ancient times. Scullard closes with a discussion of Etruria's relations with Rome, marked by a period of Etruscan rule over the city during the reign of the Tarquins in the 6th century, a reign that ended with the collapse of Etruscan power in Latium and the rise of republican government within Rome itself. --Gregory McNamee

About the Author

Howard H. Scullard (1903-83) was a professor of ancient history at the University of London. He was the author of The History of the Roman World from 753 to 146 B.C. and From the Gracchi to Nero: A History of Rome from 133 B.C. to A.D. 68.


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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Claudio R. Salvucci on June 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
I received this book as a gift--which is always dangerous with Etruscan because the field is rife with sloppy theorizing and bad scholarship.

But this book turned out to be a true gem: clear, well-researched, and not overstretching of the evidence. And I was particularly delighted with Scullard's copious references to Etruscan historical traditions and legends from classical authors--with a breadth that I have not seen in any other Etruscan book to date. It has assumed pride of place in my Etruscan library.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By etruscarch on September 10, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book, though now outdated, contains a wealth of information on questions which have only just recently become prominent in the field of Italian archaeology. Scullard does a brilliant job of unwraveling the fabric of the Etruscan city and the role the local elites played in pre-Roman Etruria. The book is a great starting place for anyone interested in the material culture of Etruscan cities and the influence they had on the development of Archaic Rome.
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18 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
Granted there's not a lot known about the Etrusians; but rather than analyze what's been found about these people and give some insight as to how they lived, why they came to prominence and then why they faded almost into oblivion, the author lists and lists what was found in the tombs. However, you'll find excellent maps of the cities but overall it's laborious to read. The Time-Life series is much more interesting and overall more informative for a non Archeological student. How many times can you say that?
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2 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
Granted there's not a lot known about the Etrusians; but rather than analyze what's been found about these people and give some insight as to how they lived, why they came to prominence and then why they faded almost into oblivion, the author lists and lists what was found in the tombs. However, you'll find excellent maps of the cities but overall it's laborious to read. The Time-Life series is much more interesting and overall more informative for a non Archeological student. How many times can you say that?
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