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Euripides: Bacchae Paperback – May 30, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-1463533489 ISBN-10: 1463533489

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 42 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (May 30, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1463533489
  • ISBN-13: 978-1463533489
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.1 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,720,041 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Very accessible and 'fresh' translations, which will be valuable additions to American theatre. (Jeff Wirth, Editor Interactive Theatre Newsletter) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Greek --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Copeland on July 4, 2005
Format: Hardcover
After having my eyes opened by Willaims' translation, I decided to revisit Rudall's work. While Williams is poetic and prone to flights of fancy, Rudall is more down to earth, which is appropriate for a god like Dionysus.

Yes he is a god of frenzy, but he is also a god of dying. I think this is why dance is sacred to him. Dance feels gravity's pull, leaps against it, succumbs to it, and leaps yet again. Life that is tied to the earth tries to transcend it, and struggles until it falls exhausted to the ground, only to rise and struggle again. It ain't all about exaultation, but is also about falling down.

Williams' translation sometimes flies away like a flock of pretty birds. Rudall keeps pulling us back to earth, back to the mysteries, and helps us plumb the depths of this play's truths. He doesn't let a bunch of pretties get in the way. He makes sure we see Everything.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on April 30, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"The Bacchae" was written by Euripides when he was living in Macedonia in virtual exile during the last years of his life. The tragedy was performed in Athens after his death. These factors are important in appreciate this particular Greek tragedy because such plays were performed at a festival that honored the Dionysus, and in "The Bacchae" he is the god who extracts a horrible vengeance. The tragedy clearly demonstrates the god's power, but it is a terrible power, which suggests less than flattering things about the deity himself.
Pentheus was the son of Echion and Agave, the daughter of Cadmus, the founder of the Royal House of Thebes. After Cadmus stepped down the throne, Pentheus took his place as king of Thebes. When the cult of Dionysus came to Thebes, Pentheus resisted the worship of the god in his kingdom. However, his mother and sisters were devotees of the god and went with women of the city to join in the Dionsysian revels on Mount Cithaeron. Pentheus had Dionysus captured, but the god drove the king insane, who then shackled a bull instead of the god. When Pentheus climbed a tree to witness in secret the reverly of the Bacchic women, he was discovered and torn to pieces by his mother and sisters, who, in their Bacchic frenzy, believed him to be a wild beast. The horrific action is described in gory detail by a messenger, which is followed by the arrival of the frenzied and bloody Agave, the head of her son fixed atop her thytsus.
Unlike those stories of classical mythology which are at least mentioned in the writings of Homer, the story of Pentheus originates with Euripides. The other references in classical writing, the "Idylls" written by the Syracusean poet Theocritus and the "Metamorphoses" of the Latin poet Ovid, both post-date"The Bacchae" by centuries.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By bukhtan on December 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
I doubt anyone will go so far as to shell out $65.00 and find out the hard way, but this spectacular book:

1986 2nd ed.
English Book lix, 253 p. ; 19 cm.
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press.
ISBN: 0198721250 (pbk.) 9780198721253 (pbk.)

contains in fact the Greek text, with apparatus, accompanied by this great scholar's introduction and line by line commentary. I have never seen a better commentary on a Greek tragedy, and in fact the work may be of some value to Greekless readers, but it is NOT the translation referred to by the other reviewers at this site.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By tim thomas on February 3, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
No translator is credited for this text - the incredible story of Dionysus' entry into Greece which has interesting hints of hidden rituals and about which Nietzsche wrote extensively. Dodds, the Greek scholar, has also concentrated on it. The text here, published by Classicbooksamerica, uses a mock-Biblical English ("doths" and "canst thous"), making it dreary for the contemporary reader. . .lacks clarity, lacks soul.
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Format: Paperback
This translation is more modernized, making for an easy read. The pages are set up with the translation on the right and explanations about concepts and themes on the left. The explanations are insightful and did benefit me. I would suggest this version for high school students or for leisure, but I suggest a more true to the text translation for higher education.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This play is for those who are looking for a closer connection and information on the God Dionysus. The play describes how the Maenads worshiped the Great God of Wine, Ecstasy, and Wild Abandonment. I great price and a great read!
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