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Euripides III: Hecuba, Andromache, The Trojan Women, Ion (The Complete Greek Tragedies) (Vol 5) Second Edition Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0226307824
ISBN-10: 0226307824
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Euripides (c. 480 – 406 BCE) wrote some ninety plays, nineteen of which have survived.


David Grene (1913–2002) taught classics for many years at the University of Chicago. He was a founding member of the Committee on Social Thought and coedited the University of Chicago Press’s prestigious series The Complete Greek Tragedies.



Richmond Lattimore (1906–1984) was a poet, translator, and longtime professor of Greek at Bryn Mawr College.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 255 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; Second Edition edition (January 15, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226307824
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226307824
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #149,360 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

The third in this series of translation of Greek drama has the same basic flaws as the others: conservative translation. But also like the others it is very readable and affordable. I also liked the fact that these plays were organized so that the stories are shown in their interconnected fashion. An audience member in ancient Greece would have this full background and thus it is a wonderful ideas for the modern reader to take time and at least read all the introductions before beginning any one text.
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Again, Grene and Lattimore deliver an excellent collection of plays by Euripides. The language and clear and readable in all translations. However, I also continue my criticism that these works lack footnotes to guide readers through obscure mythological references. I believe the Arrowsmith translations have a few, but this should be more widespread.

And interesting aspect to this volume in particular is the thematic unity of the plays. The first three all concern the division of skin and treasure after the fall of Troy. The fourth (Ion) is something of an anomaly, but was actually my favorite of all those within this volume.
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Dr. Oakes, or as I liked to call him, Professor Oak had assigned this text for our Humanities class.
It was definitely a great read even though it is pretty boring.
We didn't read it all... just the Trojan Women and what had happened to them after the war.
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