Eva Cassidy

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At a Glance

Birthname: Eva Marie Cassidy
Nationality: American
Born: Feb 02 1963
Died: Nov 02 1996 (33 years old)


Biography

Eva Cassidy

Eva Cassidy, whose pure, powerful voice caused a collective spontaneous reaction around the world that she did not live to witness, continues to touch her millions of fans, more than seven years after her death on Nov. 2, 1996 from melanoma at the age of 33.

With more than six million CDs sold around the world (over two million in the U.S.), Cassidy has achieved an unprecedented three consecutive posthumous No. 1 albums in England: Songbird in March, 2001; Imagine in August, 2002; and American Tune in August, 2003.

Born in Washington, DC, Cassidy grew up around music in ... Read more

Eva Cassidy

Eva Cassidy, whose pure, powerful voice caused a collective spontaneous reaction around the world that she did not live to witness, continues to touch her millions of fans, more than seven years after her death on Nov. 2, 1996 from melanoma at the age of 33.

With more than six million CDs sold around the world (over two million in the U.S.), Cassidy has achieved an unprecedented three consecutive posthumous No. 1 albums in England: Songbird in March, 2001; Imagine in August, 2002; and American Tune in August, 2003.

Born in Washington, DC, Cassidy grew up around music in Oxon Hill, Maryland (and in Bowie, Maryland after the age of nine). Her father, a special needs teacher, played bass while her brother Dan played violin. She was encouraged to sing at home with her three siblings from an early age and became serious about music and guitar playing at age nine. By high school, she was in a band and sang at weddings.

Cassidy worked in a plant nursery by day to fulfill her desire to be close to nature and played in local clubs by night, developing a loyal following. Her canon of recordings began when she wandered into producer Chris Biondo’s studio to sing backup on a band’s demo to make extra money. Biondo, impressed with her talent, asked her to come back so he could record her as a soloist, eventually introducing her to Washington’s “king of go-go” Chuck Brown. In 1992, The Other Side, a collection of blues duets by Brown and Cassidy was released by local Liaison Records. Next came Live At Blues Alley, her first solo album, which was recorded at the D.C. nightspot and released locally in the spring of 1996. At the time, she and Biondo were also at work on a studio album which was to become Eva by Heart, completed by Chris Biondo and released locally by Liaison Records almost a year after Eva's death. The Washington Area Music Association (WAMA) honored her and Live At Blues Alley a scant three weeks after her death with nine WAMMIES, including Artist of the Year, Album of the Year and Best Female Vocalist in four separate musical genres. They also inducted her into the WAMA Hall of Fame, which was, according to the Washington Post, “a gesture inspired more by sentiment than by any actual fame garnered by the sadly under-noticed Cassidy.”

After Cassidy’s terminal cancer diagnosis, Blix Street Records recording artist Grace Griffith, a friend and fan of Cassidy’s, sent label owner Bill Straw a copy of Live At Blues Alley. “We have this nightingale that I’m afraid we’re going to lose,” Griffith told Straw. “She was the greatest singer I’ve ever heard; she never knew how good she was.” Straw made an agreement with Cassidy’s parents one year after Eva’s passing and worked closely with them to catalogue Cassidy’s body of work. “I knew that technically she was one of the best singers I’d ever heard,” Straw says. “To be able to combine that technical skill with her extraordinary emotional range and depth was without precedent.”

In April, 1998, Los Angeles-based Blix Street began a campaign to bring Eva Cassidy's music to the world with the release of Songbird, a collection containing re-defining versions of Sting's "Fields of Gold," Christine McVie's signature "Songbird," and classics "Autumn Leaves" and "Over The Rainbow." Compiled from Live At Blues Alley (4 tracks), Eva By Heart (5 tracks), and "Over The Rainbow" (from The Other Side, Eva's 1992 duet album with Chuck Brown), Songbird made its way around the world from hand to hand via word of mouth, stopping critics and programmers in their tracks when it occasionally fell into the right hands. High profile magazines such as People Magazine gave it a rave review out of the box. After the morning DJ, Robin Young, at WBOS (an otherwise "Americana" format radio station in Boston) played a cassette copy of "Fields of Gold" in August of 1998, the phones lit up and Songbird immediately sold 10,000 copies in the Boston area.. In England the e-mails flooded BBC Radio 2 after morning radio personality Terry Wogan began to play "Over the Rainbow" and other tracks from Songbird. Sales grew steadily as the print media and public radio stations across America, England and Australia began to discover Eva Cassidy. Meanwhile, ABC's Nightline producer/on-air correspondent Dave Marash and friends were listening to Eva's "Over The Rainbow" late at night while covering the war in Bosnia.

Blix Street Records had also released Live At Blues Alley and Eva By Heart during the summer of 1998, the first national exposure for both albums, followed in May, 2000 by Time After Time, the second collection selected from Eva Cassidy's catalog of unreleased recordings.

A December, 2000 feature on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition sparked a retail run that snowballed into a wave of media attention that propelled Eva's recordings into the top five positions on Amazon.com's "best seller" chart, a feat that would be repeated several more times in the months and years to come. In Britain, the airing on BBC's Top of the Pops2 of a grainy video of Cassidy performing “Over the Rainbow” sent Songbird back into the British album charts. It was re-broadcast in January, 2001 due to viewer requests (that the BBC reports was the most in the history of the show), which in turn ignited a print and television media frenzy. By March 18, 2001, Songbird had ascended to Number One on the British and Irish Pop Charts, causing the American media to demand an explanation. The Today Show, ABC World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, People Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, Us Weekly and the Wall Street Journal, to name but a few, have all tried to analyze the Eva Cassidy phenomenon as Songbird topped Billboard’s “Internet Album Sales” chart. It also topped Billboard's Pop Catalog Album chart for nine consecutive weeks in the U.S. Producer/correspondent Dave Marash, who had been listening to Songbird for over three years in faraway plces, now had the ammunition to approach his bosses at ABC's Nightline regarding an Eva Cassidy segment, which grew into a whole program dedicated to The Eva Cassidy Story. First aired in May, 2001, it was re-broadcast on July 4, 2001, August of 2002 and January of 2004, making it one of, if not the, most popular program in the history of Nightline.

Two more Eva Cassidy collections have been released since Songbird first went No. 1 in Britain in March of 2001. Both Imagine and American Tune entered the British charts at No. 1, in August of 2002 and August of 2003 respectively.

The Songbird album was officially certified Gold in the U.S. (500,000 copies) by the RIAA (Recording Industry Assn. of America) on Nov. 2, 2001, five years to the day following her passing and is now platinum (over 1,000,000).

Grammy®-winning music writer Joel E. Siegel called her “one of the greatest voices of her generation,” while Don Heckman of the Los Angeles Times wrote, “Definitions become virtually useless to describe the singing of Eva Cassidy.” A recent BBC poll put her 21st in a list of the “100 Voices of the 20th Century." “She sang for the pure joy of singing,” said her mother, Barbara Cassidy, “however, the spirit would move her.” Now we are all sharing that joy.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Eva Cassidy

Eva Cassidy, whose pure, powerful voice caused a collective spontaneous reaction around the world that she did not live to witness, continues to touch her millions of fans, more than seven years after her death on Nov. 2, 1996 from melanoma at the age of 33.

With more than six million CDs sold around the world (over two million in the U.S.), Cassidy has achieved an unprecedented three consecutive posthumous No. 1 albums in England: Songbird in March, 2001; Imagine in August, 2002; and American Tune in August, 2003.

Born in Washington, DC, Cassidy grew up around music in Oxon Hill, Maryland (and in Bowie, Maryland after the age of nine). Her father, a special needs teacher, played bass while her brother Dan played violin. She was encouraged to sing at home with her three siblings from an early age and became serious about music and guitar playing at age nine. By high school, she was in a band and sang at weddings.

Cassidy worked in a plant nursery by day to fulfill her desire to be close to nature and played in local clubs by night, developing a loyal following. Her canon of recordings began when she wandered into producer Chris Biondo’s studio to sing backup on a band’s demo to make extra money. Biondo, impressed with her talent, asked her to come back so he could record her as a soloist, eventually introducing her to Washington’s “king of go-go” Chuck Brown. In 1992, The Other Side, a collection of blues duets by Brown and Cassidy was released by local Liaison Records. Next came Live At Blues Alley, her first solo album, which was recorded at the D.C. nightspot and released locally in the spring of 1996. At the time, she and Biondo were also at work on a studio album which was to become Eva by Heart, completed by Chris Biondo and released locally by Liaison Records almost a year after Eva's death. The Washington Area Music Association (WAMA) honored her and Live At Blues Alley a scant three weeks after her death with nine WAMMIES, including Artist of the Year, Album of the Year and Best Female Vocalist in four separate musical genres. They also inducted her into the WAMA Hall of Fame, which was, according to the Washington Post, “a gesture inspired more by sentiment than by any actual fame garnered by the sadly under-noticed Cassidy.”

After Cassidy’s terminal cancer diagnosis, Blix Street Records recording artist Grace Griffith, a friend and fan of Cassidy’s, sent label owner Bill Straw a copy of Live At Blues Alley. “We have this nightingale that I’m afraid we’re going to lose,” Griffith told Straw. “She was the greatest singer I’ve ever heard; she never knew how good she was.” Straw made an agreement with Cassidy’s parents one year after Eva’s passing and worked closely with them to catalogue Cassidy’s body of work. “I knew that technically she was one of the best singers I’d ever heard,” Straw says. “To be able to combine that technical skill with her extraordinary emotional range and depth was without precedent.”

In April, 1998, Los Angeles-based Blix Street began a campaign to bring Eva Cassidy's music to the world with the release of Songbird, a collection containing re-defining versions of Sting's "Fields of Gold," Christine McVie's signature "Songbird," and classics "Autumn Leaves" and "Over The Rainbow." Compiled from Live At Blues Alley (4 tracks), Eva By Heart (5 tracks), and "Over The Rainbow" (from The Other Side, Eva's 1992 duet album with Chuck Brown), Songbird made its way around the world from hand to hand via word of mouth, stopping critics and programmers in their tracks when it occasionally fell into the right hands. High profile magazines such as People Magazine gave it a rave review out of the box. After the morning DJ, Robin Young, at WBOS (an otherwise "Americana" format radio station in Boston) played a cassette copy of "Fields of Gold" in August of 1998, the phones lit up and Songbird immediately sold 10,000 copies in the Boston area.. In England the e-mails flooded BBC Radio 2 after morning radio personality Terry Wogan began to play "Over the Rainbow" and other tracks from Songbird. Sales grew steadily as the print media and public radio stations across America, England and Australia began to discover Eva Cassidy. Meanwhile, ABC's Nightline producer/on-air correspondent Dave Marash and friends were listening to Eva's "Over The Rainbow" late at night while covering the war in Bosnia.

Blix Street Records had also released Live At Blues Alley and Eva By Heart during the summer of 1998, the first national exposure for both albums, followed in May, 2000 by Time After Time, the second collection selected from Eva Cassidy's catalog of unreleased recordings.

A December, 2000 feature on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition sparked a retail run that snowballed into a wave of media attention that propelled Eva's recordings into the top five positions on Amazon.com's "best seller" chart, a feat that would be repeated several more times in the months and years to come. In Britain, the airing on BBC's Top of the Pops2 of a grainy video of Cassidy performing “Over the Rainbow” sent Songbird back into the British album charts. It was re-broadcast in January, 2001 due to viewer requests (that the BBC reports was the most in the history of the show), which in turn ignited a print and television media frenzy. By March 18, 2001, Songbird had ascended to Number One on the British and Irish Pop Charts, causing the American media to demand an explanation. The Today Show, ABC World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, People Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, Us Weekly and the Wall Street Journal, to name but a few, have all tried to analyze the Eva Cassidy phenomenon as Songbird topped Billboard’s “Internet Album Sales” chart. It also topped Billboard's Pop Catalog Album chart for nine consecutive weeks in the U.S. Producer/correspondent Dave Marash, who had been listening to Songbird for over three years in faraway plces, now had the ammunition to approach his bosses at ABC's Nightline regarding an Eva Cassidy segment, which grew into a whole program dedicated to The Eva Cassidy Story. First aired in May, 2001, it was re-broadcast on July 4, 2001, August of 2002 and January of 2004, making it one of, if not the, most popular program in the history of Nightline.

Two more Eva Cassidy collections have been released since Songbird first went No. 1 in Britain in March of 2001. Both Imagine and American Tune entered the British charts at No. 1, in August of 2002 and August of 2003 respectively.

The Songbird album was officially certified Gold in the U.S. (500,000 copies) by the RIAA (Recording Industry Assn. of America) on Nov. 2, 2001, five years to the day following her passing and is now platinum (over 1,000,000).

Grammy®-winning music writer Joel E. Siegel called her “one of the greatest voices of her generation,” while Don Heckman of the Los Angeles Times wrote, “Definitions become virtually useless to describe the singing of Eva Cassidy.” A recent BBC poll put her 21st in a list of the “100 Voices of the 20th Century." “She sang for the pure joy of singing,” said her mother, Barbara Cassidy, “however, the spirit would move her.” Now we are all sharing that joy.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Eva Cassidy

Eva Cassidy, whose pure, powerful voice caused a collective spontaneous reaction around the world that she did not live to witness, continues to touch her millions of fans, more than seven years after her death on Nov. 2, 1996 from melanoma at the age of 33.

With more than six million CDs sold around the world (over two million in the U.S.), Cassidy has achieved an unprecedented three consecutive posthumous No. 1 albums in England: Songbird in March, 2001; Imagine in August, 2002; and American Tune in August, 2003.

Born in Washington, DC, Cassidy grew up around music in Oxon Hill, Maryland (and in Bowie, Maryland after the age of nine). Her father, a special needs teacher, played bass while her brother Dan played violin. She was encouraged to sing at home with her three siblings from an early age and became serious about music and guitar playing at age nine. By high school, she was in a band and sang at weddings.

Cassidy worked in a plant nursery by day to fulfill her desire to be close to nature and played in local clubs by night, developing a loyal following. Her canon of recordings began when she wandered into producer Chris Biondo’s studio to sing backup on a band’s demo to make extra money. Biondo, impressed with her talent, asked her to come back so he could record her as a soloist, eventually introducing her to Washington’s “king of go-go” Chuck Brown. In 1992, The Other Side, a collection of blues duets by Brown and Cassidy was released by local Liaison Records. Next came Live At Blues Alley, her first solo album, which was recorded at the D.C. nightspot and released locally in the spring of 1996. At the time, she and Biondo were also at work on a studio album which was to become Eva by Heart, completed by Chris Biondo and released locally by Liaison Records almost a year after Eva's death. The Washington Area Music Association (WAMA) honored her and Live At Blues Alley a scant three weeks after her death with nine WAMMIES, including Artist of the Year, Album of the Year and Best Female Vocalist in four separate musical genres. They also inducted her into the WAMA Hall of Fame, which was, according to the Washington Post, “a gesture inspired more by sentiment than by any actual fame garnered by the sadly under-noticed Cassidy.”

After Cassidy’s terminal cancer diagnosis, Blix Street Records recording artist Grace Griffith, a friend and fan of Cassidy’s, sent label owner Bill Straw a copy of Live At Blues Alley. “We have this nightingale that I’m afraid we’re going to lose,” Griffith told Straw. “She was the greatest singer I’ve ever heard; she never knew how good she was.” Straw made an agreement with Cassidy’s parents one year after Eva’s passing and worked closely with them to catalogue Cassidy’s body of work. “I knew that technically she was one of the best singers I’d ever heard,” Straw says. “To be able to combine that technical skill with her extraordinary emotional range and depth was without precedent.”

In April, 1998, Los Angeles-based Blix Street began a campaign to bring Eva Cassidy's music to the world with the release of Songbird, a collection containing re-defining versions of Sting's "Fields of Gold," Christine McVie's signature "Songbird," and classics "Autumn Leaves" and "Over The Rainbow." Compiled from Live At Blues Alley (4 tracks), Eva By Heart (5 tracks), and "Over The Rainbow" (from The Other Side, Eva's 1992 duet album with Chuck Brown), Songbird made its way around the world from hand to hand via word of mouth, stopping critics and programmers in their tracks when it occasionally fell into the right hands. High profile magazines such as People Magazine gave it a rave review out of the box. After the morning DJ, Robin Young, at WBOS (an otherwise "Americana" format radio station in Boston) played a cassette copy of "Fields of Gold" in August of 1998, the phones lit up and Songbird immediately sold 10,000 copies in the Boston area.. In England the e-mails flooded BBC Radio 2 after morning radio personality Terry Wogan began to play "Over the Rainbow" and other tracks from Songbird. Sales grew steadily as the print media and public radio stations across America, England and Australia began to discover Eva Cassidy. Meanwhile, ABC's Nightline producer/on-air correspondent Dave Marash and friends were listening to Eva's "Over The Rainbow" late at night while covering the war in Bosnia.

Blix Street Records had also released Live At Blues Alley and Eva By Heart during the summer of 1998, the first national exposure for both albums, followed in May, 2000 by Time After Time, the second collection selected from Eva Cassidy's catalog of unreleased recordings.

A December, 2000 feature on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition sparked a retail run that snowballed into a wave of media attention that propelled Eva's recordings into the top five positions on Amazon.com's "best seller" chart, a feat that would be repeated several more times in the months and years to come. In Britain, the airing on BBC's Top of the Pops2 of a grainy video of Cassidy performing “Over the Rainbow” sent Songbird back into the British album charts. It was re-broadcast in January, 2001 due to viewer requests (that the BBC reports was the most in the history of the show), which in turn ignited a print and television media frenzy. By March 18, 2001, Songbird had ascended to Number One on the British and Irish Pop Charts, causing the American media to demand an explanation. The Today Show, ABC World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, People Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, Us Weekly and the Wall Street Journal, to name but a few, have all tried to analyze the Eva Cassidy phenomenon as Songbird topped Billboard’s “Internet Album Sales” chart. It also topped Billboard's Pop Catalog Album chart for nine consecutive weeks in the U.S. Producer/correspondent Dave Marash, who had been listening to Songbird for over three years in faraway plces, now had the ammunition to approach his bosses at ABC's Nightline regarding an Eva Cassidy segment, which grew into a whole program dedicated to The Eva Cassidy Story. First aired in May, 2001, it was re-broadcast on July 4, 2001, August of 2002 and January of 2004, making it one of, if not the, most popular program in the history of Nightline.

Two more Eva Cassidy collections have been released since Songbird first went No. 1 in Britain in March of 2001. Both Imagine and American Tune entered the British charts at No. 1, in August of 2002 and August of 2003 respectively.

The Songbird album was officially certified Gold in the U.S. (500,000 copies) by the RIAA (Recording Industry Assn. of America) on Nov. 2, 2001, five years to the day following her passing and is now platinum (over 1,000,000).

Grammy®-winning music writer Joel E. Siegel called her “one of the greatest voices of her generation,” while Don Heckman of the Los Angeles Times wrote, “Definitions become virtually useless to describe the singing of Eva Cassidy.” A recent BBC poll put her 21st in a list of the “100 Voices of the 20th Century." “She sang for the pure joy of singing,” said her mother, Barbara Cassidy, “however, the spirit would move her.” Now we are all sharing that joy.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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