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Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels Paperback – February 1, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-1881052852 ISBN-10: 1881052850

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers (February 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1881052850
  • ISBN-13: 978-1881052852
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 0.7 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,535,615 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Scientific American

This book encapsulates Don Kirkpatrick's lifetime of experience and provides real solutions to the training evaluation dilemma. The tools, techniques, and case studies this book includes will help trainers add rigor and discipline to this often neglected aspect of training work. I'm delighted to recommend this book as a valuable resource. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Don Kirkpatrick set the standard in training evaluation in 1959, and ever since, dedicated training professionals have used his Four Levels model for evaluating the impact of their work. Evaluating Training Programs finally makes these ideas available in an easy-to-use reference guide. -- Jane Holcum, Ph.D., ON-Target Training --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Dr. Donald L. Kirkpatrick holds B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

At the Management Institute of the University of Wisconsin, he taught managers at all levels the principles and techniques of many subjects, including Coaching, Communication, Managing Time, Managing Change, Team Building, and Leadership.

In industry, Don served as the Training Director for the International Minerals and Chemical Corp., where he developed a Performance Appraisal Program. He later served as the Human Resources Manager of Bendix Products Aerospace Division.

Don is a past national president of the American Society For Training and Development (ASTD), where he received the Gordon Bliss and "Lifetime Achievement in Workplace Learning and Performance" awards. He is a member of Training Magazine's Hall Of Fame. In 2007, he received the "Lifetime Achievement Award" from the Asia HRD Congress.

Don is the author of seven Management Inventories and seven books, including the 3rd edition of Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels, which has become the basis for evaluation all over the world. His other books include Implementing the Four Levels, Transferring Learning to Behavior, Developing Employees Through Appraisal and Coaching, How To Plan and Conduct Productive Meetings, and Managing Change Effectively.

Don was a regular speaker at national ASTD, IQPC, Nielsen (Training Magazine), and other professional and company conferences, as well as at ASTD chapter meetings, before his official retirement from public speaking in May 2011.

For more information about Don and his work, visit kirkpatrickpartners.com.

Customer Reviews

This is an excellent book for anyone charged with evaluating training.
John Cosgrave (cosgrave@tinet.ie)
If you are interested in implementing Kirkpatrick's four-level model and/or ROI, you need to read Another Look at Evaluation Training Programs.
Stacey L. T. Boyle, Ph.D.
The book also contains examples of data collection instruments and other evaluation tools that can be adapted for a trainer's own needs.
HOYET HEMPHILL

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

77 of 79 people found the following review helpful By Stacey L. T. Boyle, Ph.D. on July 5, 2000
Format: Hardcover
If you expect to interact with those in the training industry, you had best be armed with knowledge of Kirkpatrick's four-level model. For instance, if someone asks, "What are you doing about Level IV?" you need to come back with a robust response such as, "Well, we evaluate the impact of training by....". Kirkpatrick first presented his model in 1959 in a series of articles in the Training and Development Journal. In this book, the Godfather of training evaluation succinctly outlines his four-level model of training measurement: measuring reaction, measuring learning, measuring behavior, and measuring results. This book is an up-to-date enhancement of his model. It consists of corporate examples, which are always helpful, and survey templates. If you are looking for a model to increase training effectiveness, reduce cycle time of design and development of courses, or establish baselines, this is a good primer. I praise him for consistently encouraging formative evaluation. Less seasoned training professionals only conduct summative evaluation (Level 1-smiley sheets), but evaluation should not be seen as an event as much as a life-cycle process. The ISD process includes a formative evaluation approach, which is often over looked. If you read this book and measure all four levels, you will be on the right track to evaluation utopia.
If you are a serious evaluator or interested in calculating return on investment, a "must read" is Jack Phillips Return on Investment in Training and Performance Improvement Programs. Phillips expands Kirkpatrick's models to a fifth level, which is return on investment (ROI), and encourages ROI at Kirkpatrick's four levels, too.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By HOYET HEMPHILL on June 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book should be in every instructional designer's or training manager's library. Kirkpatrick's four-level model of training evaluation is frequently referenced in the training literature and is the standard for evaluating the impact of training. It is part of the common language used in the training industry. This book is also an excellent primer for some of the basic issues involved in evaluating the effectiveness of training programs. It contains numerous case studies from actual training programs. Almost two-thirds of the book teaches through case studies.
The book also contains examples of data collection instruments and other evaluation tools that can be adapted for a trainer's own needs. I wish the first part of the book had been expanded to provide more explanation of the four levels before launching into the case studies. Kirkpatrick has edited another book, Another Look at Evaluating Training Programs, which contains articles by other evaluators who discuss many issues related to the Kirkpatrick model and provide further case studies.
There has been much interest in return-on-investment (ROI) in the training industry. Kirkpatrick cautions against confusing ROI with results; they are not the same. Financial return is just one of many possible critical success factors. The focus on ROI can even mask true business results that encompass more strategic factors and involve a larger time frame than is typically analyzed in ROI analysis. Nevertheless, the reader may want to look at Return on Investment in Training and Performance Improvement Programs by Jack Phillips.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Les Lauber on March 6, 2000
Format: Hardcover
An indispensable work for anyone concerned with getting the most value from their training programs. What you'll find in this book:
* A concise but solid explanation of the four levels and the purpose of each level.
* Guidelines for measuring at each level.
* More than a dozen case studies that demonstrate how a variety of training organizations have implemented one or more of Kirkpatrick's levels, including sample forms and data analysis.
Kirkpatrick doesn't offer an "evaluation formula" with instructions to plug in an organization's name or training titles to a prefabricated shell. Instead, he presents a skeletal structure which an organization can flesh out to create an evaluation system.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Robert T. Schaefer on July 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Okay so this is an old and perhaps dated book, but it is still the definitive work on linking the training and development process to real knowledge, work performance, and business results.
Before Kirkpatrick (sometimes even today) Trainers and Training Managers would judge the effectiveness of a learning treatment by the opinion of the learner ("Level One" Measurement)...you know, those silly little evaluation sheets where we are always asked such banal questions as: "Did you LIKE the course," or the obligatory "Do you FEEL smarter," and so forth. Most in the educational field also understood the need of testing the learner in order to validate knowledge (This is "Level Two").
But in this book old Don K. gives us the Third and Fourth levels of learning. Level Three: Basically, if you cannot empirically demonstrate that the learning experience translates well into behaviors on-the-job, AND provide perceived value for the company (a.k.a. "Level Four"), then it really does not matter how much you actually learned, now does it spanky!?
As many might know, since the time of Kirkpatrick, ROI (Return on Investment) is now "the Fifth Level" of learning measurement. This ratio is defined as the Benefits of your learning program in dollars, Divided by the Total Cost of your program, Multiplied by 100, which gives you an ROI percentage. Anything over 100% suggests a positive return. Pffft! When will these so-called learning professionals learn to acount for the Net Present Value of cash?? I mean, even if you give a company a positive return because of your glorious learning management system, they still had to shell out massive capital upfront, right?
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