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How to Go from Being a Good Evangelical to a Committed Catholic in Ninety-Five Difficult Steps: Paperback


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How to Go from Being a Good Evangelical to a Committed Catholic in Ninety-Five Difficult Steps: + Bible Made Impossible, The: Why Biblicism Is Not a Truly Evangelical Reading of Scripture
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 214 pages
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub (June 9, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1610970330
  • ISBN-13: 978-1610970334
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #63,717 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"While showing appreciation and respect for his evangelical patrimony, Christian Smith offers a careful, clear, and thoughtful path to the Catholic Church for those evangelicals who are entertaining Catholicism as they seek to walk more authentically in Christ. This is a truly unique contribution to the growing literature authored by former evangelicals who have found their way to St. Peter's barque."
-Francis J. Beckwith
author of Return to Rome: Confessions of An Evangelical Catholic

"Christian Smith is correct in describing why it usually takes a 'paradigm revolution' for an evangelical to become a Catholic. The 'anomalies' he describes for evangelical life are mostly accurate and his presentation of Catholicism is attractive. But this intriguing book would have been even better if it had paused to reflect on why there are so many paradigm shifts in the other direction--of people born Catholic who become evangelical. Anyone--Catholic, evangelical, or a convert in either direction--who responds thoughtfully to the arguments of this book will be a better Christian for having made the effort."
-Mark Noll
author of The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind

"I expect that this book may turn out to be the definitive text (short of the Fathers only!) for evangelicals who are prepared to address themselves courageously to the ecclesiological question. Smith's writing is brisk, starkly clear, challenging, and exhaustive (not exhausting!); he leaves no stone unturned. This is the best book I've seen on the topic."
-Thomas Howard
author of On Being Catholic --Wipf and Stock Publishers

About the Author

Christian Smith is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of The Bible Made Impossible (2011), What is a Person? (2010), and Souls in Transition (2009).

More About the Author

Christian Smith is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Society, and the Center for Social Research at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of many books, including What is a Person?: Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good from the Person Up (Chicago 201); Passing the Plate: Why American Christians Do Not Give Away More Money (OUP 2008); Soul Searching: the Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers (OUP 2005), Winner of the 2005 "Distinguished Book Award" from Christianity Today; and Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture (OUP 2003).

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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I especially like that it's a very personal book but at the same time very smart.
PublishWell
Within the Evangelical world there is a great deal of misinformation and misunderstanding about Catholics, what we believe and how we worship.
Carolyn Gwaltney
This book is principally an account of the causes, phases and processes he went through in making that move.
Peter S. Bradley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By William Gwaltney on July 10, 2011
Format: Paperback
I started looking into the Catholic Church about six years ago, and joined about four years ago from a background of Methodist, Presbyterian, and non-denominational church experiences. So I've lived through the steps that Chris Smith writes about in his very good book. As the title of this review says, Smith seems to have "read my mail" in describing the experience of going from Evangelicalism to Catholicism. I found myself saying out loud on multiple occasions "yes, that's it exactly" because I could identify so closely with some of the steps.

I highly recommend this book to all who are contemplating "swimming the Tiber" and becoming Catholic, or those who are trying to understand why a friend or loved one has made the leap. Even those who simply want to understand what Catholics believe or why someone would want to convert will learn a great deal. The tone of the book is not scholarly or pedantic, but but is readable without being simplistic. In short, this book is an interesting, enjoyable, eye-opening read.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By SkipBurz on June 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
Through a friend, I was able to get my hands on a manuscript of this book late in 2010 while my family and I were contemplating a "shift" (as Smith rightly and respectfully calls it in the Introduction) from evangelical Protestantism to Catholicism. This short work was incredibly helpful, pitched perfectly in tone and content. At times, I felt as if Smith was anticipating my next question and was ready with a well-reasoned response.

The best compliment I can pay this book is that like Tom Howard's "Evangelical is Not Enough," many of us will be sure to have several copies on hand to give to friends and family. I believe this book will be useful for decades to come, not only for Evangelicals who are discerning their place in the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church, but also for Catholics who want a clearly reasoned argument for why we have chosen the path we have.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By PublishWell on June 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book has really helped me to make sense of my own experience with converting to Catholicism after being a Protestant Christian for many years. I especially like that it's a very personal book but at the same time very smart. Dr. Smith is a professional sociologist, so he has a better understanding of the fundamentals of faith than most people. It really rises above the "I'm right/you're wrong" debate to look honestly at why we are (or choose to stop being) Protestants. He's also very honest about how difficult a transition this can be. This book is a good friend on the journey of investigating our faith roots as evangelicals.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By James H. Toner on January 9, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Christian Smith, professor of sociology at the University of Notre Dame, and a convert to Catholicism, tells us, in brief, that the Reformation is over, and it's time for evangelicals to come home to the Catholic Church. To support his reasoning, he suggests a series of ninety-five steps, "painful" ones, he admits, which evangelicals may take on their journey of discovery and discernment.

This is a bizarre book: It is in part auto-biographical without being an autobiography; it is in part a work of apologetics without being an apologia; it is in part an occasionally splenetic view of modern evangelical belief without being an outright vitriolic memoir about all things evangelical. As G. K. Chesterton might have put it, there is too much room between the covers in some areas of this volume; in other areas, however, the treatment of important subjects (such as the Assumption and indulgences) is cursory to the point of dismissal.

Any serious reader will leave Smith's impenetrable and convoluted discussion of infallibility wondering why some editor couldn't have rescued the floundering sociologist. (See pp. 132-135 for a relativist, deconstructionist, and simply incoherent treatment of infallibility.) By the same token, Smith keeps saying that he is no liberal. His comments, though, about the priesthood and what "remains in play" (116n) betray the kind of confusion and exalted privacy of opinion or autonomy of choice he, elsewhere (97), is at pains to challenge and criticize. (The text would have been nourished, had Smith here made use of John Paul's Veritatis Splendor.) After reading the note on p. 116, for instance, consult paragraph four of Ordinatio Sacerdotalis (22 May 1994) and compare it with Smith's analysis (QED).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Z888 on February 27, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have been intensely studying Catholicism for the last 6 months and thought I had read most of the standard arguments/explanations for the big topics of Catholicism... then I read this book! Not only did I feel like I was reading my own personal list of problems with the evangelical side, but Catholicism was well explained, defended and researched. The author also spoke with a respectful tone, something very lacking (and, quite frankly, distasteful) that I saw in other books. Furthermore, the bibliography was a great place to find documents for further inquiry.
The reference to indulgences, which somehow seems to be popping up in these reviews, is MINOR compared to the rich help the author provides for those considering Catholicism from an evangelical background. If you are ready to be learn & be challenged, this is the place to start!
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