Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Evangelical Reunion: Denominations and the One Body of Christ Paperback – July, 1991


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$62.22 $8.21

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 185 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Pub Group (July 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801035600
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801035609
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 0.5 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,615,890 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

John M. Frame (AB, Princeton University; BD, Westminster Theological Seminary; MA and MPhil, Yale University; DD, Belhaven College) holds the J. D. Trimble Chair of Systematic Theology and Philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando and is the author of many books, including the four-volume Theology of Lordship series.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Michael E. Marshall on May 10, 2000
Format: Paperback
Irenic is the term to describe the tone of this study of what can be the subject of the most strident of conversations among believers. In this book, Pastor Frame manages to examine the history of sectarianism within the Church and offers some jewels of wisdom for the reader. Beginning with the first division in the early Church and continuing to now, this book is a study in the processes that led to the present, fragmented Church. Frame challenges every Christian to distinguish between loyalty to Christ and denomination. Offering clear insights, this book is a "must read" for every evangelical.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kathy F. Cannata on September 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book changed my mind. The best I have ever read on ecumenism from a conservative Reformed perspective. Dr. Frame is a Yale graduate, seminary professor, and PCA pastor.

He argues that schism is dangerous stuff, always tragic, and not to be entered into lightly. So, he says, the PCA's leaving the PCUS in 1973 may have been justified, but their not joining up with an existing body like the ARP or OPC at the time was a sin. They made some amends by merging with the RPCES, which itself was a merger of two other bodies. Organic union is not the sole test of catholicity, but it is one important goal. You have to wonder about the PCA and ARP's indifference to even beginning talks of merger.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
A new ecumenism was afoot among Christians. This movement was different from the old ecumenism which tried to water down the faith for unity's sake. This movement hold dearly those doctrines that are essential to the faith, and discovers afresh what common doctrines bind us together. John Frame writes directly to this point. He believes that denominationalism is a curse that defames the Lord. And by denominationalism, he means that sinful attitudes and mentalities that cause the splits as well as the splits themselves.

Frame speaks directly to evangelical churches using evangelical arguments. Similar to Catholic Christopher Dawson, Frame believes that most denominationalism comes about through political, social, and personal disagreements, rather than key theological ones. Frame, as Dawson, even questions the motives and outcomes of the dividing of Christendom at the Reformation. He believes that denominationalism weakens church discipline, weakens the meaning of church membership, causes an imbalance of spiritual gifts, hardens existing divisions, and even destroys church courts. They create unholy alliances, comprise the church's witness to the world, and lead to creedal stagnation, as well as superficiality and distorted priorities. The church becomes parochial rather than universal, emphasizing unhealthy competition among denominational groups and ungodly pride and snobbery. Yet Frame discusses how legitimate forms of denominational loyalty are valid.

Frame outlines a biblical view of tolerance where "[t]he ideal is not a tolerant church where all views are given equal respect (i.e., doctrinal indifference); rather, it is a church where all members are agreed on the truth so that tolerance of opposing views in unnecessary" (p. 91).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
In Frame's usual style of taking theological precision and pressing to see it applied by hearts stirred by God, this work is a wonderful look at denominationalism and its true Biblical warrant.

Dr. Frame sets out to show that denominationalism is in fact not Biblical and only comes into the scene as a result of sin - whether by the original group, the seceding group, or both. His arguments throughout are cogent and convicting. He argues that the Lord set out to establish one united Church Body (Eph. 3:4ff) and not the factional denominations we have today (at least not in their present form). Frame is constantly calling the church back to the Scriptures which call for a unity in truth and love.

His practical suggestions are helpful; and he admittedly does not have all the answers but desires for those who can provide more helpful insight into the dissolving of denominations to come forward.

He shares great insights into the nature of the body of Christ, the divisional character that has come from within it, and some steps we can (and should) take, as evangelicals, toward a stronger unity in the faith. His approach is not to be seen as some rash ecumenical call to boil everything down to the least common denominator so as to be left with nothing but liberalism (and so nothing for the evangelical).

But he does call each believer to be constantly evaluating his own denomination in light of the Scriptures and be prepared to hold to Scripture more than denominational preferences. For an example of his approach, he writes:

"So much of our denominational life is structured according to "us" vs. "them." It's West vs. East, Protestant vs. Catholic, Presbyterian vs. Episcopal, dispensationalist vs. covenant theology, charismatic vs.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again