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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic first installment
So, I have always been one of those people who buys books at random. If I see it and it looks even remotely appealing, I generally end up with a copy. That is what happened with my newest acquisition, "Eve of Darkness." It just stared me down from the shelf, its sweet cover-art refusing to allow me to look away. And when I read the back cover and discovered that it was...
Published on April 29, 2009 by P. Ramirez

versus
31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Promising start to a new series! (not trilogy, as I previously thought)
Welcome to S.J. Day's California, where demons walk among us, unbeknownst to all but a few chosen souls. These chosen souls are the "Marks," so named because they bear the Mark of Cain. Personally recruited by God to serve as demon-hunting enforcers, they gain superhuman powers and a chance to expiate their sins. The oldest, baddest mark is Cain himself. He's still a...
Published on April 28, 2009 by Kelly (Fantasy Literature)


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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Promising start to a new series! (not trilogy, as I previously thought), April 28, 2009
By 
Kelly (Fantasy Literature) (Columbia, MO United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) (Mass Market Paperback)
Welcome to S.J. Day's California, where demons walk among us, unbeknownst to all but a few chosen souls. These chosen souls are the "Marks," so named because they bear the Mark of Cain. Personally recruited by God to serve as demon-hunting enforcers, they gain superhuman powers and a chance to expiate their sins. The oldest, baddest mark is Cain himself. He's still a rebel with a distaste for rules, and he still doesn't get along with that brother of his.

Our heroine, Evangeline "Eve" Hollis, finds herself thrust unexpectedly into the life of a Mark after a hot elevator interlude with a man who reminds her eerily of her first love, Alec Cain. (Guess who.) Eve of Darkness follows Eve as she adjusts to her new powers, learns to navigate the world of celestial and infernal politics, and wrestles with feelings for both Cain and Abel.

Eve is an interesting character in a subgenre where heroines often seem cookie-cutter. She's not a complete loner, for starters -- she has a complicated relationship with her parents and a warm, sweet friendship with an elderly widow in her building. She also seems very realistic in her initial reactions to the changes in her life. Rather than suddenly transforming into a hard-edged warrior, she is reluctant to embrace this new existence, and would rather just get on with her interior design career until she realizes there's no going back. She also is able to think outside the box at times and come up with unconventional solutions to problems.

S.J. Day has obviously done her research into the lore she is using. The moment where her hard work really became evident to me was in the scene with the lilin. I've seen variations on lilin in several urban fantasies, but how many authors incorporate the legend that a hundred lilin die every day, and work that into the characterization?

Pacing is a little odd. The early chapters of the book are very steamy, and most of the non-sex action deals with a serial-killing water demon who is stalking Eve. Another plot is also building during this time, involving demons who've found a way to hide their nature from Marks, but this plot doesn't really pick up until later in the book. When it does become a major plot, it explodes into something very big and very complex, and suddenly there are werewolf families and mages and animal mutilations and byzantine double-crossings, and seemingly-important characters introduced pretty late in the story. I was sometimes confused. It felt, if this makes any sense, like the sex plot was a little too "front-loaded" and the action plot a little too "back-loaded." It felt like two separate episodes of Eve's story rather than two threads braided together. Also, and I admit this is a very silly peeve, but I don't like the convention of using the word "wolf" to refer to a werewolf when the creature is in human form. It always makes me picture the four-footed variety and throws me out of the story.

Then again, maybe it's premature to make a judgment about the pacing. Eve of Darkness and its sequels, Eve of Destruction (Marked, Book 2) and Eve of Chaos (Marked, Book 3), are scheduled to come out within a few short months, and it's clear that they're meant to be read in rapid succession. (Evidence: The first chapter of Eve of Darkness is actually a cliffhanger for Eve of Destruction.) Perhaps after reading all three, the overall "flow" of the series will be more clear.

S.J. Day has created a unique world, and it has many secrets that have yet to be revealed. I'm especially interested in finding out what sets Eve apart; there are hints that there is something unusual about her that caused her to be chosen in the first place. I'm also interested in the intricacies of angelic politics and what the various angels' agendas and plots are. I look forward to seeing where this goes.

If I didn't make it clear above, readers should be advised that there is a great deal of sex in Eve of Darkness! Depending on whether you're a member of the "Yay, Fantasy with Sex!" club or the "Get This Stinkin' Sex Out of My Fantasy" club, your mileage may vary.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic first installment, April 29, 2009
By 
This review is from: Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) (Mass Market Paperback)
So, I have always been one of those people who buys books at random. If I see it and it looks even remotely appealing, I generally end up with a copy. That is what happened with my newest acquisition, "Eve of Darkness." It just stared me down from the shelf, its sweet cover-art refusing to allow me to look away. And when I read the back cover and discovered that it was the first book in a new series, and that the next two books would be released by July, I was sold.

The premise of the book was pretty compelling. I mean, there are a lot of `supernatural' books out there today. It seems like everyone and their dog is jumping on the bandwagon, writing books about demons and werewolves and vampires and faeries. Now don't get me wrong, I love the majority of those books. But this series is about Angels and other main players in the bible. How original is that?
The books center around a woman named Evangeline (Eve) and a stairwell tryst that results in her being punished with the mark of Cain. Cain also happens to be the last name of Eve's first love, who took her virginity and left without a trace a decade earlier. Of course, the story wouldn't be complete without Cain's brother. And Abel is alive and well in this book. In fact, he was the one trysting with Eve in the stairwell. And the one who did the marking. Nefarious.

Being marked initiates a change that gives Eve super-human senses, makes her impervious to the effects of mind-altering substances, and (for some reason) makes her hornier than a person has a right to be. Lucky for her Cain swoops in to facilitate her life-change. Once the change is complete, it is he who advises Eve that the marked are pretty much the assassins of the angels. (That is the short description.) And that she must now spend her life hunting down and killing Infernals (the various and assorted demons and other such damned that roam the earth.)

The book actually started off weird for me, because it felt like you were walking into the middle of something. But, the pacing quickly reasons itself out, and the story flows really well. It was a very well written first installment for the series, answering the questions that needed immediate answering as well as leaving enough unfinished to leave you wishing you could start on the next book. Fortunately, the next book comes out in June, so the wait won't be too excruciating. (Come on, I know for a fact that I am not the only one who has been waiting impatiently for the next Laurell K. Hamilton book for a freaking year!!)

All in all, I was pleasantly surprised by both the quality of the plot and the dimension of the character dev elopement. I would recommend this book to anyone who is looking for a breath of fresh air in a played-out genre. I easily give this book 4 stars.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I was looking for, May 20, 2009
This review is from: Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) (Mass Market Paperback)
I'm not sure why I keep browsing the urban fantasy; I keep being dissapointed. Jim Butcher is about the only one I keep consistantly liking...I'm not sure what the heck the Anita Blake series did, Sookie Stackhouse seems to be meandering, and I couldn't get into Armstrong's books, Harrison's books, or Caine's books. (Actually, with Caine I binged on the sugar-lightness and then utterly burned out on book five or something.) Patricia Brigg's novels are solid enough, but they don't have the zing either. Perhaps what I'm looking for isn't being written.

I couldn't really get my heart around this one; it has all the "required" bits...heroine in fast-paced career, hot guys, sex, action...and the magic system has some thought behind it, it's a very interesting twist on the whole Christian mythos (no insult intended to those christians reading this). But I found the sex repetative and boring--it's just not subtle at all. It's not romantic. It seemed like a bunch of pointless rutting to me. The guys were cover-model hot but not very deep (to me at least). The opening scene is never resolved at the end of the book, we never get back to the dragon or see what happens at the game.

Writing-wise, the book didn't have any other obvious flaws...it seemed square and novel-shaped. Technically competent. But it didn't really suck me in. It didn't have that *pull*, it didn't give me that fascination I get when reading a really really good book. And I was hoping it would have.

Oh well.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Backstory, April 28, 2009
This review is from: Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) (Mass Market Paperback)
Religion is real in S. J. Day's EVE OF DARKNESS.

Cain and Abel are pseudonymously known nowadays as Alec Cain and Reed Abel. Lifelong brothers and enemies, they have lots to fight over, including Evangeline Hollis. Agnostic Eve has been Marked as a sinner, and has gone from interior designer to demon-killer-in-training. Alec and Reed want her to accept her fate, but Eve wants the mark removed and her life back. God, however, has other plans.

The first chapter is a stunner, combining the normalcy of a football game with...what lurks in the men's toilets. The rest of the novel is six weeks of backstory, with flashbacks to ten years ago when Alec deflowered Eve. Though the publisher has labelled this urban fantasy, more likely it'll appeal to paranormal romance fans because of the relationship stuff going on. Brothers fighting over a woman: Alec and Reed seriously need to get over themselves, and play nice for the sake of humanity. Okay, for Heaven's sake. (I really didn't want to make a pun in this review, but look what you made me do.) Mind you, if they haven't grown up properly during the however many thousand years they've been alive, they're hardly going to start now.

I'm not entirely sure why Eve was Marked. Since sinners are drafted to kill demons, her sin must be...rooting Reed in the stairwell after they just met, and maybe didn't know each other's names. I'm not quite clear on that, or maybe because she "tempted" both brothers. I must have forgotten this detail, or it wasn't explained well enough, which is a problem when your protag is a "chosen one" - readers want to know why.

The series concept seems so obvious in hindsight, it's actually a surprise that no one thought to do it before. The author's angels and demons are well-crafted and original, as is the worldbuilding. But then when witches and werewolves come into the picture...it seems a bit kitchen sink. The dogs and Eve communicating via thought seemed a little too easy, but I'd just come off reading Jeanne C. Stein's first two novels, where vampires communicate that way. Seems too much like telling than showing.

I like Eve's relationship with neighbour Mrs Basso. It's nice for Eve to have a friend, and Eve's mum Miyoko is really intriguing. Born in Japan, she later became a naturalised American, but I'd love to read about American life through Japanese eyes. It gives me hope that S. J. Day will move on to feature other religions, such as Shogun and Shinto (if I remember eighth grade social studies correctly, which I probably don't). Eve is a breath of fresh air in that she's biracial. Usually in paranormal fiction characters are half-vampire or half-werewolf, so it's just splendid to have someone who's human on both sides with parents from different countries. This may make it easier for readers to connect with Eve, and urban fantasy protags can definitely do with more ethnicity. (It goes without saying that Eve is hot: particularly on the cover of the upcoming second book in this series, EVE OF DESTRUCTION. Just so you know.)

Overall the concept seems better than the execution thus far, but now that the backstory is out of the way we can get to the good stuff. We haven't met God yet, or Lucifer. And since there are other firms in the world, hopefully we'll have some international action. There are a lot of possibilities, so this series could end up longer than just the three (so far) contracted novels. I hope so.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Interminable Darkness, August 17, 2009
This review is from: Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) (Mass Market Paperback)
I'll begin with the assumption that anyone reading this is a fan of either detective fiction, fantasy fiction, or otherwise the alt-world fiction of the sort that presumes the existence of hidden realms of vampires, demons, wizards, werewolves and the like *among us* -- undetected by us ordinary mortals save for the few who guard us from unknown perils.

"Eve of Darkness" purports to be fiction of that kind. But if you're looking for a gripping, smart, funny, page-burner, stick with Jim Butcher, Rachel Caine, Charlaine Harris and the like. Eve of Darkness is not their equal. Not by half. Instead, it's juvenile trash. Poorly written, unimaginative, and mostly a vehicle for delivering badly written porn. Did I mention that it's badly written?

Here's the premise. A woman has a sexual encounter with an angel on an elevator. After we've endured the gasping throbbing 'his engorged manhood her throbbing wetness multiple gasping orgams' of it all, we learn that sex with an angel "marks" a person. The Mark becomes an enforcer in heaven's legions, which are organized and run rather like a criminal enterprise; within that enterprise, "people" (or things) frequently interact by, you guessed it, having wet, sticky, tawdry, badly written sex. Did I mention that this novel is badly written?

Anyhow, "the change" that makes one "A Mark" has the principal effects of giving one superpowers, that allow them to fight baddies. It also makes them very horny. That plot device serves as a mechanism for introducing, all too frequently, yet more episodes of 'her gasping need, his thrusting desire' etc ad nauseam sex.

By now we're not surprised. Indeed, we're bored. I was bored by Chapter 4, but felt I needed to read the whole novel to "give it a chance." I'm writing this review so that you, the reader, won't feel the need to sacrifice yourself on the altar of fairness.

It's a cliche that "a picture is worth a thousand words." Were I to substitute a picture for a thousand words of "Eve of Darkness," the picture would be a grainy, smudgy, stained page ripped from a crude porno magazine found in a gutter.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An Inconsistent Read, May 16, 2009
This review is from: Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) (Mass Market Paperback)
Evangeline (AKA - Eve) Hollis is inexplicably thrown into a world she never knew existed. Ten years before, she lost her virginity and her heart to Alec Cain. Until meeting him, she was level headed and not promiscuous, but she was so drawn to Alec that she could not help but do the deed. Soon after, Alec bails and does not come back. Although it is later revealed that he does this to protect her, Eve is left doing the "I got played" scene in a hotel room. Pan forward ten years and Eve is a successful designer going to a job interview. As she is leaving the interview, she sees some guy who looks a lot like Cain (but isn't) and she is so overcome by lust that she does him in the stairwell in front of a camera. So much for strong and level headed. This was my first "What?" moment. As a result, stairwell lover, in a moment of really hokey drama, leaves her with the "Mark of Cain" and now she must be a sinner who fights evil for the Lord. Hey, it could have been worse, he could have left her with the "Mark of Syphyllis." It is soon brought to light that she was targeted for the stairwell nookie (wait wasn't that a sin in the Bible?)because Cain is not playing by all of the rules and his brother and bosses want to control him. So, Eve gets damned because of something someone else did or wants. Not very Christian, but there are many interpretations of Christianty, so I was still with this story so far. Then another EEEW moment occurs when it is revealed that her stairwell lover is Reed (AKA - Abel). Cain and Abel are indeed the brothers from the Bible left to do penance for centuries. Why did the author name her Eve - wasn't that their mother's name? Another EEEW monent. I guess she was keeping it all in the family. Anyway, Eve, who the book continues to stress is so level headed except, of course, when it comes to the brothers, takes all of this relatively easily and determines to find a way to lose the "Mark of Cain". Oddly enough, she never becomes so overwhelmed that she cannot say "no" if she wants again, which makes me think that if she was not in control with Abel in the stairwell, then how could it have been her choice and wouldn't that be a form of rape? Why is she taking things so calmly with Reed/Abel? By this point, I am over this book, but I paid for it, so I finished it right to the very predictable ending. I am not giving away major plot here, most of the things I have written pretty much occur in the the beginning anyway. There are parts of this story that I found interesting and to have promise, but if the sex was a sin, then why are Eve and Alec still allowed to go at it? At least Eve is allowed to learn how to fight and much drama and action ensues as they try to find the bad guys. There are just a number of things that make no sense. This is a book that could be really good, but the author needs to decide whether this is a book about Eve doing two brothers or if she is to be an actual three dimensional character. There is a lot of potential, but it may be outweighed by the inconsistencies in the novel. Furthermore, rape sanctioned by God is really disturbing and damned by God so that he can get Cain to play the way he wants is not believable. God is the almighty in this story and this is the way that he has Cain play by the rules? Is he not the good guy? If Eve takes the Lord's name in vain, she gets a shock. But being unfairly marked for the brother's ambitions is fair game? The reasons for major events that occur in this novel are extremely shallow and often inexplicably cruel. While I am aware that bad things happen in life and people often suffer due to things they are not responsible for, I believe that a novel should offer valid reasons and not just ones that move the story along and allow Eve to bang the brothers for thrill and plot filler. I understand that two more novels are coming soon. Maybe Eve can do Moses, Adam, and the King of Egypt next.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disjointed and uneven, July 5, 2009
By 
This review is from: Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) (Mass Market Paperback)
First, while this is being sold as urban fantasy, the first volume, at least, would fit far more comfortably into the paranormal romance genre. The inexplicable obsession of Cain and Abel with "Eve" is the running theme of this novel, easily surpassing any other plot elements. The story starts out on a bizarre level for me. Eve is clearly under some kind of mental control when she is lured into a stairwell for hot and explicit sex with Abel, a supernatural being. I really can't find any other description for this, given the clear level of mental control involved, but rape. Afterwards, and I really never came to terms with this, she has to work off her "sin" to God, having been marked by Abel while he was, in effect, raping her. What sin that was is never explained. Even if you leave off the mental control all you've got is pre-marital sex, which pretty much every woman in the western world over the age of 17 is guilty of. Anyway, she is now "marked" and is controlled by guess who - Abel! Yes, he is her mentor and guide, the guy who will assign her missions to work off her guilt and earn God's forgiveness. Frankly, this is just dumb writing. They could easily have made her do some kind of criminal act which brings real guilt and a real need to earn forgiveness. But the writing is quite uneven here. There are long periods with she and Cain, and her mother and neighbor which kind of drag, and the rivalry between Cain and Abel does become tiresome. The action sequences are fine, but overall, the book didn't really didn't excite enough to draw me in.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Eve and Cain - a recipe for trouble, July 17, 2009
By 
T. McAuley (Sheffield, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) (Mass Market Paperback)
Evangeline Hollis is a young woman leading an ordinary, mundane life: she has a successful career as an interior designer, a condo, a car - all the trappings of success, and yet she feels dissatisfied, and unfulfilled. Ten years earlier, barely out of high school, she shared a single night of passion - her first - with the mysterious Alec Cain, a man with whom she felt an immediate and intimate connection, but who was gone from her bed by morning. Despite this, no other man has been able to move her in the same way since, until an encounter with the equally attractive and charismatic Reed Abel drives her to another singular act of passion - one that is to have unimagined, and unimaginable, consequences.

For Cain and Abel turn out to be the Biblical brothers: Cain doomed to walk the Earth hunting and killing demons to expiate his sin, and Abel, now an angel, Marking and managing sinners to join the fight against the Infernal - and Eve is the latest recruit to bear the Mark of Cain. Suddenly, she finds herself thrust unprepared into a new, and dangerous, world: where the legions of the damned and the celestial mix with mortals, and engage in a delicate dance that can erupt into violence at any moment. If she wants to survive, Eve has no choice but to join in and learn how to protect herself, from both the Infernals who seek to harm Cain through her, and the machinations of the archangels who command God's forces on Earth. All while struggling with her own emotions, as with her Marking, Cain returns to her life with the same animalistic magnetism, tempered now by a determination to protect her, and to resume his centuries old quarrel with Abel, who has designs on her of his own, and remains an enticing temptation.

In Eve of Darkness, S. J. Day has created a new take on the old story of the battle between Good and Evil being fought on Earth. It's something that has been tackled before by many authors - supercharged holy warriors fighting demons, while needing to keep it secret from humanity, and seeking their own redemption, is hardly new - but to this she adds Old Testament figures, and the character of Eve herself. She's a familiar Urban Fantasy protagonist: courageous in spite of herself, unfailingly pure-hearted, afflicted by complex feelings for an improbably gorgeous man, who harbours his own complex feelings in return, and in some ways cleverer and more cynical than beings centuries older than herself. Following her as she adjusts to her new life as a Mark, and looks for a way to be free of it, is one of the pleasures of the book, and is perhaps the main reason why it might be worth buying the second volume of the series, Eve of Destruction.

I've noticed that another reviewer has questioned the logic of the book's central premise - that the Lord would damn someone to the life of a Mark for a minor indiscretion - and that's something I echo: it does seem unlikely. But then, one shouldn't over-analyse books like this and, after all, the God of the Old Testament was not above tormenting the innocent to test their faith, or achieve His own ends - just look what happened to Job - and I can't help thinking that there's more to Eve's marking than meets the eye: as the characters are fond of remarking, `There is no coincidence where the Lord is concerned.'

In any case, Day keeps the plot moving, liberally spicing the book with both action and sex, and writes reasonably well, if not quite at the standard of one of the queens of the genre like, for example, J. R. Ward. Reading it is an undemanding, but enjoyable way to pass a few hours, and there are enough loose ends, and interesting hints left at the end to make one want to buy the next in the series, but not enough make you want to camp out in front of your bookstore to get hold of it!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fresh, imaginative and high octane!!, April 28, 2009
By 
Bookaholics Reviewer (Bay Area, California) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) (Mass Market Paperback)
Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) by S.J. Day
Mass Market Paperback - April 28, 2009
4 stars

S.J. Day's new series Marked is: fresh, imaginative and high octane. It blends a hunky hero to die for and a gutsy heroine, thrown into circumstances that are enthralling as well as nail-bitingly suspenseful.

There is a war going on, but most humans don't see it. The Marked are those special chosen and/or cursed to fight these unholy terrors and save humanity.

Evangeline has never been religious; she has a good life and is content. The only thing she doesn't have is a man. The problem is that after she met Alec, no other man has matched up to him and she knows none ever will. Alec left her after one night and completely ruined her for any other man.

When Eve is unexpectedly attacked, years later, by a man that looks eerily similar to Alec, she finds her life irrevocably changed. She is now `marked' and dragged into a world of good and evil. Suddenly, the real Alec comes to rescue her and Eve discovers that he too is `marked'. Because Alec cares for her, she has been targeted as his one vulnerability. Ironically, he left to save her from his dangerous life, but there is no fighting destiny. Now Eve has a fast learning curve in this new game of life or death. Even as Eve is drawn to Alec, she knows he's not healthy. The only sane thing to do is try to reverse the `mark', even if she dies trying.

From the first page, this book pulled me in! It is a fast thrill ride that NEVER lets up. I particularly enjoyed how Eve explores this new world of: angels, demons, shifters, etc. The novel is filled with mystery and shady characters that will leave you wondering where they and the story are leading.

For those who love Urban Fantasy and dark paranormals romances, this series is sure to please your palate. However, I do have to caution for those readers that enjoy a pat ending, this is the first of the Marked series and the author does leave the ending at a HUGE cliffhanger. Luckily the next installment is coming soon. If you can't stand the stress, I would suggest waiting to read all the books at once, if you can wait!

Reviewed by Steph from Bookaholics Romance Book Club
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Don't waste your time, December 1, 2009
By 
BookReviewer (North Carolina) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) (Mass Market Paperback)
Please don't waste your time with this book. I thought the idea was great, yet horribly executed. The endless, pointless sex scenes are a lame plot device. Why is she constantly having sex? The main character is weak, pitiful and just doesnt get what's going on through the entire book. Every other page one of the two male leads is trying to have sex with her and she does it and pretends she hates it. This is just garbage, I couldnt even finish the book unfortunately.S.J. Day, this was a great idea, however it was horribly executed.
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Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1)
Eve of Darkness (Marked, Book 1) by Sylvia Day (Mass Market Paperback - April 28, 2009)
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