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Everest: Season 2


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Product Details

  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Discovery - Gaiam
  • DVD Release Date: November 18, 2008
  • Run Time: 347 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001DWNUBU
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #33,113 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

A new team of daring men and women, led by legendary expedition leader Russell Brice, takes on the world's highest mountain in the second season of this popular Discovery series. Learn who's got what it takes to make it up this huge peak as high-definition cameras capture the team's exhilaration, exhaustion, fear and hardship. Includes the Bonus Feature: "After the Climb."

Customer Reviews

I'd tell you why but that might give away ending!
W. Bray
It is very interesting to study the various personalities as well as the technical and physical challenges that make up an Everest expedition.
Dr. Geek
You feel like you are right there on the mountain.
WDB

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By K. Johnson on July 15, 2009
Format: DVD
Having done some climbing, (many years ago) the subject matter and cinematography are highly compelling, and season 1 was very good. Season 2 however, is a study on how you can take an already very dramatic subject, and stretch it "beyond the limit" to the point of ridiculous.

I am not by any means berating the expedition members, (well, except for Betsy, who was a joke) but the film makers quest for high ratings seems to be the guiding force here. I can almost hear them asking the following questions -
1. Just how many times can we show spinning images of all the metal in Tim's body?
2. Seems like there isn't enough drama this year, how about a fight between Tim and Russ?
3. How many times can we talk about HAPE and HACE? I mean, after all, people need to hear it at least 30 times, don't they?
4. Why would we show all of the compelling, but silly aspects of climbing, when we can repeat the same footage, over and over and over and over and over.... (I do realize that TV shows need a certain amount of repetition, but 8 times within the same episode?)
5. Can we get a ridiculously unqualified female climber? And, can we make her look even more stupid? Just for laughs?

In an attempt to make things more dramatic, as is usual with reality TV, some of the realism seems lacking. I'm normally a huge Discovery fan, but if there is a season 3....I'll pass....I've basically already seen it.
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34 of 42 people found the following review helpful By taikoman on December 1, 2009
Format: DVD
I enjoyed this series (both season 1 & 2). There's a bit too much screen time spent re-re-recapping what occurred in previous episodes but it was still thoroughly engaging drama.

Now on to one hugely annoying element of this series: Tim Medvetz, one of the expedition members.

Why did they have to spend SOOOO much screen time on this buffoon? I found the other climbers much more interesting & agreeable. By contrast, Tim is a cartoonish caricature of the loud, obnoxious, arrogant, reckless, self-absorbed, pompous American. He treats everything like a party and acts as if he's the center of the universe. Oh, and he also grunts "U.S.A!!!" like the walking cartoon that he is. As an American, I'm tired of seeing the same old onscreen formula that says "American" = "rugged individual" = "loud obnoxious jerk".

Through both season 1 & 2, this man NEVER does what he's asked to do. He always leaves late, does what he wants, goes where he wants, creates bottlenecks and naps in the snow. He basically tells others to go screw themselves and acts like the tough guy who goes it alone but then whimpers for help later on.

And that's not even the worst of it. He's full of cheap platitudes about conquering Everest, learning about himself, the importance of teamwork, about how he can't respect people who don't come prepared or respect the mountain, blah blah blah, but he never demonstrates any of those qualities himself. And he never acknowledges the tremendous help he gets - to him, it's simply a story of Tim versus Everest. In truth, he would not have gotten as far as he did without outside help, and he might very well have died without them. To the very end, he continues to talk narcissistically about what HE accomplished.

I find it annoying that this series seems to celebrate his self-absorbed bay boy antics. And if I ever climb Everest, I hope to God I don't have someone like him on my expedition.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Anthony J. Lomenzo on November 22, 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Don't hesitate on this one! Grab it! The second season PLUS what in my opinion is an equally important bonus area of discussion [all visual material] including various of the series participants and extra input from those who need no introduction to their high altitude climbing credentials and mountaineering achievements. So too, in the bonus material, the hard questions [read: TV documentary criticisms] of the documentary on Everest are not avoided nor in any way sugar-coated. You're looking at approximately 7 hours of visual material here between the TV episodes and the added bonus discussion material consisting of 4 extended episodes entitled, "Everest: After the Climb" . You absolutely can't beat it for under $15.00! This was the price [$14.97] when I did the review.

I'll lay my cards on the table and as I always do especially if commenting on films [documentary or fiction!] or books that deal with the climbing and/or mountaineering community. I'm tired of seeing Russell Brice used as a sort of handy and proverbial punching bag and especially by, inter alia, various and sundry types who wouldn't know a belay from a ballet or whose knowledge of high altitude climbing and its 'realities' wholly escapes them. Still others take the view that Brice is somehow the perceived "culprit" and allegedly 'responsible' [!?] for the David Sharp matter [2006] as if Russell had some hidden magic wand and could simply wave it around a few times and, voila, some 20 Sherpas could be made to suddenly materialize from his tent to initiate high altitude rescues of virtually anyone in trouble and regardless of altitude issues or weather considerations.

The bonus material addresses various of these considerations. But it also addresses the 'realities' of high altitude climbing in general.
Read more ›
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. Calderon on February 19, 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is the 2nd round for Tim and Mogens. Just after watching season 1, I felt the frustration for those who coudn't reach the summit. I'm a climber and I know those feelings. Season two is as good as season 1, more faster and less introductions and details than season 1. Cameras now have better shots from camps, also a good training on the ice wall. Unfortunately for Betsy (the journalist) she paid the price for underestimate Everest (no training for 10 years), she collapses.
Also in this season you can see two familiar faces (Tim and Mogens), plus the old man (japanese) that broke the record reaching the summit at 71.
The extras are good, full details and some interviews, even people from season 1.
5 stars for this DVD.
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Everest: Season 2
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