Every Little Step 2009 PG-13 CC

Amazon Instant Video

(85) IMDb 7.3/10
Available in HD

Follows the journey of A Chorus Line from initial idea in the 1970s to its current Broadway revival.

Starring:
Bob Avian, Ramon Flowers
Runtime:
1 hour 34 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Every Little Step

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Music, Documentary
Director Adam Del Deo, James D. Stern
Starring Bob Avian, Ramon Flowers
Supporting actors Justin Bellero, Michael Bennett, Jay Binder, Kelly Bishop, John Breglio, Candy Ann Brown, Nigel Columbus, Charlotte d'Amboise, Jacques d'Amboise, Nicholas Dante, Mara Davi, Natascia Diaz, Tyce Diorio, Rick Faugno, Luis Augusto Figueroa, Ramon Flowers, Jen Frankel, Christopher Freer
Studio Sony Pictures Classics
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customers Who Watched This Item Bought

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
67
4 star
15
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 85 customer reviews
EVERY LITTLE STEP beautifully shows the world what we do for love.
Karen Joan
A CHORUS LINE is one of my favorite Broadway musicals and to hear the original meetings with Michael Bennett was such a treasure.
Brent D. Murphy
Much of the film plays much like a reality show, not too much different than a reality show.
Robert Moore

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Daniel B. Clendenin on May 11, 2009
About half way through this film I wondered to myself if the audience would clap when it was over. They did, and it was a spontaneous and well-deserved conclusion. I'm betting Every Little Step will earn awards for Best Documentary of the year. The film begins as a retrospective about the original Broadway musical A Chorus Line, which debuted in 1975 and after 6,137 performances became the longest-running musical ever. Archival material and interviews with members of the original production take you back thirty years to the show's simple premise, which centered on the deeply human stories of seventeen performers. The documentary then turns to the 2006 Broadway revival of the original musical, and takes you backstage to follow the stories of the dancers who auditioned for the fifteen or so spots. It begins with an open call that drew 3,000 artists, and proceeds through several call backs until the cast is finalized. Many are called but only a tiny few are chosen for the coveted opportunity.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Infrequent reviewer on May 18, 2009
I awaited this film and, as one of the hundreds of very lucky ex-dancers who once had the thrill of working "ACL", though a long time ago, this brought back so very much of a life almost forgotten by having left to "grow up" and enter the real world. A Chorus Line was the pinnacle of a career for many of us who had the honor and distinction to be a part of it, no matter how long ago. Just as the show was like no other, so this film is absolutely like no other documentary that I have seen. It is real, it is moving, it is genuine life, whether one has ever danced, never danced but wanted to, or never even considered dancing. The film highlights the universal thirst of youth and beyond for all who have ever had a dream no matter the profession, industry, or passion. It reflects the original show itself without repeating it. Thanks Michael and Bob for giving the show--and by extension this film--to all who have ever dreamed a dream. And a special thanks as well to the original Connie, the reliable Ms. B. Lee for doing your part to keep this dream alive for so many who have followed us.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Michael D. Baker on October 14, 2009
Format: DVD
After wiping the tears away at the end of the film, my first thought was, "This helps erase the memory of the awful film Of A Chorus Line". Having seen the show a number of times before the film adaptation, I was ready for a permanent homage to my favorite of all Broadway shows. I could have shot the director after seeing his misinterpretation of the original show. Every Little Step is even better than a film of the show could be for those of us who love it.

We are given a look into the genesis of Michael Bennett's concept. I did not know how groundbreaking A Chorus Line was until seeing this film. I think we all know about workshopping plays and shows now, but this show was the first one. Mr. Bennett sold the concept and found several years' funding to develop the show. Everyone in the Broadway community knows how hard the life of chorus dancers is and I think was interested in seeing a show that honored them. Mr. Bennett "wrote" the show by committee. The stories are true, though the film points out that he might have done a lot better giving more credit to the contributors. The concept was so compelling that Marvin Hamlisch, then making a very good living doing Hollywood films, dropped everything and went to NYC to write the music. The story about retitling one of the songs is special.

The stories about making the show and the archival films bring back wonderful memories and give great insight to the original show and the inspiration to/for the revival. Having principals from the original show staging the new one gives us a special look at why casting for this revival was so hard to do. Most important to the director and backers was whether they should even dare to try reproducing this most perfect of all Broadway shows.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By DMac on May 18, 2009
Verified Purchase
"Every Little Step" is a terrific movie. I've already seen it twice in the theater and I'm looking forward to a DVD ASAP :-D

A documentary about dancers auditioning for the revival of the musical about dancers auditioning for a musical?...it sounds insular but it's not. There is a universal appeal in following the hopeful young performers who aspire against tough odds and thousands of other dancers to land a role in A Chorus Line.

I'm a sucker for competition-type stories, and I remember seeing A Chorus Line on Broadway, so I found it fascinating to see how it all began and follow the intense, complex process of bringing a production to life.

You don't have to love musicals or dancing to enjoy this documentary. But if you do, you'll probably find it entertaining, moving, and more suspenseful than many so-called thrillers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Andy Orrock VINE VOICE on June 17, 2009
If Man on Wire was the Academy Award winner for 2008's best documentary, then "Every Little Step" better be a shoo-in for 2009. We saw these two films back-to-back this past weekend and by my estimation, Step's co-directors Adam Del Deo and James D. Stern have created a more compelling film-going experience.

Art and life are intertwined here many times over - Michael Bennett's interviews of real chorus line dancers spawned the initial incarnation of the play, which grew quickly into a Broadway colossus winning a Tony for Bennett and ascending him to a Broadway pantheon reserved for its great heroes. Indeed, in this film Bennett is discussed in reverential tones. There are compelling, fascinating videos and interviews of Bennett discussing the creative process of putting 'A Chorus Line' Together. Most notably, the movie starts and ends with audio tapes of the original 12-hour session recorded by Bennett. In the world of theater, that's almost a sacred document.

With "Every Little Step," art and life get further intertwined - just as the original play pulled its stories from real dancers, the movie bookends that by pulling together the real stories behind the casting of the revival. It helps that some of the original players are here - co-casting director Bob Avian was a partner of Bennett's from the original production; and Baayork Lee - who does the choreography in the re-do - was not only 'Connie' in the original, she was also the inspiration of the Connie character. It's her voice, her story on Bennett's tape.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search