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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Let History Decide
This fascinating piece of work 'written' by Huey P. Long during the height of his reign was intended to promote his 'legend and legacy', toward the goal of becoming President of the United States in 1936. However, it is best understood from the perspective of modern times.
Huey P. Long has forever been portrayed as the personification of all that is evil in American...
Published on October 15, 2003 by Steven Hugh Wilson

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Boring!
I had just read a good book based on his life and I suppose it spoiled me. Huey's book was a real dud.
Published 11 months ago by Faye Baggett


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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Let History Decide, October 15, 2003
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This review is from: Every Man A King: The Autobiography Of Huey P. Long (Paperback)
This fascinating piece of work 'written' by Huey P. Long during the height of his reign was intended to promote his 'legend and legacy', toward the goal of becoming President of the United States in 1936. However, it is best understood from the perspective of modern times.
Huey P. Long has forever been portrayed as the personification of all that is evil in American Politics. American school children outside the State of Louisiana have been taught that Long, if left unchecked, would have destroyed American Democracy as we know it and replaced it with the most corrupt Dictatorship imaginable.
Indeed, History has given Long a 'bad rap'. 'Every Man a King' is Huey Long's side of the story. Calling himself the 'friend of the working man', Long's brief but turbulent rise through American politics is unmatched by anyone in the 20th century. He was the Establishment's worst nightmare- a true Populist who really 're-distributed the wealth'. He took on the task of taxing the rich oil companies and other business interests in Louisiana and used the money to build roads, schools, and hospitals. His accomplishments are indisputable, and the moneyed interests absolutely hated him. His own abrasive and sometimes buffoon-like personality only fueled the fire for his enemies. But make no mistake about it, Long was a brilliant man and an extremely savvy politician who posed a serious threat to the status quo.
Long has been dead nearly 70 years, yet his detractors still vehemently accuse him of 'robbing the people blind' during his reign. I say 'let history be the judge'. As late as the 1980's, most of the existing paved roads, schools, and hospitals in Louisiana were built during the Long administration.
After his election to the U.S. Senate, Long became a national figure and a serious contender for the 1936 Presidential nomination. His constituents were America's poor and working class, and his Socialist ideas hit a chord with many Americans during those depression-era times. There's no question that most of Roosevelt's 'New Deal' program was a (successful) attempt to 'steal Huey Long's thunder'.
Forget everything you've ever been taught about Huey Long and buy this book. There are two sides to every story, but history has only told us one side of the enigma that was Huey Long. This book will tell the other side. Read it and let history and your conscience decide whether Long was a sinner or a savior.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Every Man a King, January 12, 2009
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This review is from: Every Man A King: The Autobiography Of Huey P. Long (Paperback)
Being somewhat a student of history and a Louisiana resident for 43 years, I find the blustery, self-promoting Huey Long to be surprisingly modest in his autobiography.
He passes off some of his greatest accomplishments -- providing free textbooks for all children enrolled in public and private schools, paving highways and constructing bridges to replace ferries -- in summary sentences while focusing in depth on the politics.
He even admits mistakes, like greeting German ambassadors in his pajamas.
The book is written in a conversational manner and is an easy, enjoyable read. His use of news articles ranting against his tactics is unexpected but he passes it off as their being a puppet of his arch enemy the Standard Oil Company, which is now Exxon.
It's easy to see why people either loved him or hated him. He was a champion of the common man while pocketing as much as he could along the way.
I recommend this book for anyone who is interested in how a small-town egomaniac can rise to power and wealth by inspiring the public and, at least in his eyes, doing it for the public good.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The work of a misunderstood genius, but a genius, nevertheless., April 7, 2013
This review is from: Every Man A King: The Autobiography Of Huey P. Long (Paperback)
Thanks to the fascinating Ken Burns documentary, "Huey Long," 1985, for including the title of this engaging autobiography. The Long political machine pretty much evaporated after his assassination and, as history is written by the winners, it is refreshing to read an explanation in Long's own words of some of the actions, events, motives, and methods his detractors attacked, otherwise questioned, or outright misrepresented.

For the most part, I think, Long's words simultaneously resound with down-home, small-town genuineness and the undeniable brilliance of a man who passed the bar exam after as little as one or two semesters of undergraduate study and a single year at the Tulane University Law School.

Huey Long was a very persuasive speaker and writer who once boasted, "I can sell anything to anybody," but, together with the Burns documentary, I'm ever more thoroughly convinced that there has been an ongoing campaign by various special and corporate media interests to besmirch the memory of this tireless champion of the downtrodden and powerless.

Long's thinking regarding his "Share Our Wealth" program seems especially applicable in these times of increasing income inequality and greater consolidation of assets which -- absent the means of more equitable redistribution via aggressively progressive income tax, inheritance tax, and other ideas Long proposed and/or supported -- spell doom for democracy, the so-called American Dream, and even the very idea of "America" itself.

Five stars.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Go Kingfish, June 13, 2011
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s_corpion (Bay Area, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Every Man A King: The Autobiography Of Huey P. Long (Paperback)
If Huey Long had been around during Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans and Louisiana would have recovered long ago. Huey Long knew how to get things done. After reading his own words this is not the Huey Long I learned about in history class. I have a respect for the man. I beleive if he had run for president and had been elected the country would have benefitted greatly.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Truth, Fiction or Politics as usual, January 15, 2010
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This review is from: Every Man A King: The Autobiography Of Huey P. Long (Paperback)
I have read several books concerning the New Deal and President Franklin Roosevelt. All commented upon that extraordinary political phenomenon from Louisiana: Huey P. Long. FDR is quotes as remarking that along with Douglas MacArthur, "He(Long)was one of the two most dangerous men in America". Huey Long is today just a footnote in American History. His assassination in 1935 under very mysterious circumstances ended a promising political career.

I cannot comment as to the veracity of any of the "facts" presented in "Every Man A King". The reality is that Long was a consummate politician in a State and Era where "politics" was played fast and loose. Long had Presidential aspirations. What better way to burnishing one's image and extol one's political wisdom than in a self published autobiography.

It is hard to dislike this book. It has the "sound" of a 1930 southern politician dictating his thoughts, which were then typed verbatim. No wordsmith polished these sentences to appeal too more "educated" readers. Long includes extensive quotes from newspaper editorials and numerous footnote to buttress his case. The inclusion of several relevant Louisiana political cartoons from 1930's and photos of Long's public works projects add to the considerable charm of this book.

The De Capo Press edition is an exact reproduced of the original 1933 publication - including the attractive 1930's style typeface.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Boring!, February 4, 2014
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I had just read a good book based on his life and I suppose it spoiled me. Huey's book was a real dud.
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5 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It was pretty good, September 11, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Every Man A King: The Autobiography Of Huey P. Long (Paperback)
This book is clearly a political move made by Huey Long when he was aiming for the presidency. I found it interesting to discover about his life, and how he tried to show that he was just like everybody else.
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3 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Way It Was: Nonfiction, But Still A Fantasy., September 23, 2006
This review is from: Every Man A King: The Autobiography Of Huey P. Long (Paperback)
This is the way Huey Long wanted to be remembered. During the Depression, he did make promises to the poor, hungry residents of the state of Louisiana to have food on their tables and money to buy necessities. After his election as Governor, he was the original crooked politician who reneged on his promises. With aspirations to the Presidency of the United States, he had the state capital torn down and replaced with a replica of the White House in Washington, D.C. Such bright hopes and dreaming of a person who wanted to be our first American King.

It would have been better to have a movie about the real Huey Long; instead, we have been presented two about the fictional Willie Stark as portrayed by Robert Penn Warren, in 1949 and in 2006:

Based on Robert Penn Warren's novel, it is peopled with colorful, rambunctious (must have had high testosterone), shady characters. Mainly it was two stories in one. Willie Stark was crass and prented he liked orange "pop" (I doubt they called it that in 1930 Louisiana, as it's a Northern term -- we called it "dope"), that his "little lady" wife didn't favor liquor. Neither do I. Sean Penn was the opposite of Broaderick Crawford who was the star of the 1949 movie of the same name; he made Willie out to be a vulgar, old man who could have been a "Holiness" preacher, and Huey was only 42 when he died. Instead, he turned to the devil and was a master of dirty politics with his retribution to the men who were using him, where he relished his liquor after winning the election and "moving on" to Sadie Burk, a coffee drinker, eventually a woman scorned.

Willie was more like Billy Sunday, orating at the county Fair, pretty big for the Depression years, where I expected to find Mark the hypnotist from Vegas. It looked like a Billy Graham rally. The less said about the Willie character (too much negative was shown as his love for burlesque and the New Orleans' "Carmen", then corrupted the society girl Ann, dressed in a "cherry" dress like mine in 1951 for Christine's funeral), it was draining to watch the political maneuverings and posturing.

Jack, played by Jude Law, tried to sound like New Orleans' native Harry Connick, Jr., looked like a Southern Adonis. Men in the 1920s and '30s would not be glamorous, though he did try to parody a good investigative reporter like a Jack I know, also a Jack of Clubs (from a deck of cards). He was used to destroy his own father, brother and sister with the help of an alcoholic mother. She looked as artificial as the gardenia on her outfit out in the swamps at the old mansion owned by the judge. The live oaks with the moss hanging were just plain spooky. Tony Hopkins made a good retired, refined judge and I imagined a thinner Charles Southcott with Tony's hair. Could be wrong.

We reap what we sow. Nothing will ever be the same again. Who needs love anyway? They were all frustrated men with "attitude." I can't leave out Bill Lyons, the little man who served as chauffeur, bodyguard, henchman for Willie. He was the most corrupt of all and, in the end, corruption caught up with them all when he killed his boss and Alan. Before things were set in concrete, we saw Alan as portrayed by Mark Ruffalo (a modern James Darren) who was set up to take the fall. He was effective as the intellectual failure.

The main character was overacted by Sean Penn who turned him into a raving, depraved lunatic begging to be killed. He was profane. The length and substance of this movie was draining and left one feeling empty. No Oscar for this one!
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Every Man A King: The Autobiography Of Huey P. Long
Every Man A King: The Autobiography Of Huey P. Long by Huey Pierce Long (Paperback - March 22, 1996)
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