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Every Vote Equal: A State-Based Plan for Electing the President by National Popular Vote Paperback – January 5, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 894 pages
  • Publisher: National Popular Vote Press; 3rd edition (January 5, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0979010721
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979010729
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,248,660 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This book describes the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote" an innovative approach that is a politically practical way to achieve the goal of nationwide popular election of the President. It has my enthusiastic support. --John B. Anderson (R - Illinois and Independent presidential candidate)

The President and Vice President should be chosen by the same method every other elective office in this country is filled by citizen voters of the United States in a system which counts each vote equally. ... I unequivocally support this new strategy to provide for the direct election of the President and Vice President. This new approach is consistent with the Constitution ... It s refreshing to know states have the ability under the Constitution to step up and create the sensible solution Americans have long been supporting. --Birch Bayh (D - Indiana)

The people have supported the direct election of the president for over fifty years. In this book, Dr. Koza suggests a way for states to come together and make it happen. ... I strongly support and applaud any good-faith effort to make the direct election of the president a reality and commend to you the intriguing approach offered in the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote" described in this book. --John Buchanan (R - Alabama) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

John R. Koza, originator of the Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote described in this book, received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Michigan in 1972. He published a board game Consensus involving Electoral College strategy in 1966. From 1973 through 1987, he was co-founder, chairman, and CEO of Scientific Games Inc. where he co-invented the rub-off instant lottery ticket used by state lotteries. In the 1980s, he and attorney Barry Fadem (co-author of this book) were active in promoting adoption of lotteries by various states through the citizen-initiative process and legislative action. He taught a course on genetic algorithms and genetic programming at Stanford University between 1988 and 2003. He has been a consulting professor in the in the Departments of Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, and Biomedical Informatics at Stanford University. He is Chair of National Popular Vote, a non-profit organization promoting enactment of the National Popular Vote bill described in this book. Barry F. Fadem is a partner in the law firm of Fadem & Associates in Lafayette, California. He specializes in all aspects of campaign and election law, and provides expert consultation in the area of initiatives and referendums. He is President of National Popular Vote. Mark Grueskin is a shareholder at Isaacson Rosenbaum P.C. in Denver and chairs the firm's Public Law and Policy practice. Michael S. Mandell has been an associate with the law firm of Perkins Coie Brown & Bain in Phoenix and is currently the general counsel to the Arizona State Senate. He received his J.D. with honors from Arizona State University, where he was an editor of the Arizona State Law Journal. Robert Richie has been the executive director of FairVote (formerly The Center for Voting and Democracy), a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing fair elections, since its founding in 1992. Joseph F. Zimmerman is Professor of Political Science at the State University of New York at Albany. He has authored of Interstate Cooperation: Compacts and Administrative Agreements (2002), Interstate Relations: The Neglected Dimension of Federalism (1996), Contemporary American Federalism: The Growth of National Power (1992), The Initiative: Citizen Law-Making (1997), The Referendum: The People Decide Public Policy (1997), and The Recall: Tribunal of the People (1997).

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Foolio on April 29, 2009
Format: Paperback
This updated and expanded edition of Every Vote Equal continues to prove itself as the definitive book on Electoral College reform. This includes an expansion of the "Myths" section, which responds to common arguments against reforming the Electoral College to allow for a national popular vote of the President. The book closely details the history of the Electoral College, the shortcomings of the system and inequalities that it creates, and the advantages of a national popular vote system through an interstate compact. Koza provides compelling survey data showing that a majority of people in all states support the reform, with a broad range of states showing over 70% support for the issue.

Every Vote Equal is a must-have for anyone interested in national presidential reform. This is especially true now, in light of recent success of the National Popular Vote movement, an initiative led by the author. The legislation recently passed in Washington State and poised to change the way we elect our President.
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Format: Paperback
A National Popular Vote is a compact among states. Once enough states have joined where their combined electoral votes are a majority of the Electoral College, all the member states will agree to cast their electoral votes for the winner of the national popular vote. This will have the effect of creating a direct election of the President.

A national popular vote makes every vote equal across the nation. It elects the President in the manner as every other elected official is chosen. This process is permitted under the Constitution which provides that the states determine how electors are chosen. This will make Presidential elections fairer than they have ever been.

The Electoral College was established by Constitutional Founders when there was little history of public elections. Many Constitutional Convention Founders distrusted the abilities of the voting public to have the knowledge and wisdom to vote. Newspapers were the primary medium of information in the 18th century and it was argued that voters in one state would have little knowledge of candidates from other states. At the time the Constitution was created, political power was in the hands of the state legislatures, which had the ability, by any one state legislature, to override national decisions. Therefore, the selection of the President then was left in the hands of the state legislatures.

Constitutional amendments have changed the original decisions made by Constitutional Founders. Even they did not expect their decisions to remain eternal. Their choices on other modes of elections have been changed, such as changing the election of Senators from state legislatures to direct election.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By LEON L CZIKOWSKY on July 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
A National Popular Vote is a compact among states. Once enough states have joined where their combined electoral votes are a majority of the Electoral College, all the member states will agree to cast their electoral votes for the winner of the national popular vote. This will have the effect of creating a direct election of the President.

A national popular vote makes every vote equal across the nation. It elects the President in the manner as every other elected official is chosen. This process is permitted under the Constitution which provides that the states determine how electors are chosen. This will make Presidential elections fairer than they have ever been.

The Electoral College was established by Constitutional Founders when there was little history of public elections. Many Constitutional Convention Founders distrusted the abilities of the voting public to have the knowledge and wisdom to vote. Newspapers were the primary medium of information in the 18th century and it was argued that voters in one state would have little knowledge of candidates from other states. At the time the Constitution was created, political power was in the hands of the state legislatures, which had the ability, by any one state legislature, to override national decisions. Therefore, the selection of the President then was left in the hands of the state legislatures.

Constitutional amendments have changed the original decisions made by Constitutional Founders. Even they did not expect their decisions to remain eternal. Their choices on other modes of elections have been changed, such as changing the election of Senators from state legislatures to direct election.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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