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Everybody Bakes Bread (Carolrhoda Picture Books) Paperback – December 1, 1995


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Frequently Bought Together

Everybody Bakes Bread (Carolrhoda Picture Books) + Everybody Cooks Rice (Carolrhoda Picture Books) + Everybody Brings Noodles (Carolrhoda Picture Books)
Price for all three: $20.78

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 and up
  • Grade Level: 1 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 670L (What's this?)
  • Series: Carolrhoda Picture Books
  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Carolrhoda Books (December 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 087614895X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0876148952
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 7.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #711,921 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 2-4?A rainy-day story from the creators of Everybody Cooks Rice (Carolrhoda, 1991). Carrie is sent out into her multiethnic neighborhood to borrow a three-handled rolling pin. It seems like a demeaning errand for a girl who appears to be too bright to be that naive, but the adults see it as a joke, and she has a fine time visiting the neighbors, eating seven kinds of bread, and finding enough friends for a kickball game after the rain stops. She samples coconut bread from Barbados, chapatis from India, corn bread from South Carolina, pocket bread from Lebanon, challah from the Jewish "old country," pupusa from El Salvador, and braided bread from Italy. Recipes are included. Thornton's richly colored, softly realistic illustrations show the diversity of age and nationality, lifestyles, and staple foods of this friendly neighborhood.?Carolyn Jenks, First Parish Unitarian Church, Portland, ME
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

Ages 5^-8. On a rainy Saturday, Carrie and her brother bicker so much that their mother sends Carrie on a fool's errand to borrow a "three-handled rolling pin." At the first neighbors' house, Carrie is offered a slice of freshly baked Barbadian coconut bread; at the next house, she has chapatis; and at the next, she sees corn bread cooling. Three more neighbors are baking, too, and by the time Carrie returns home, the bread at her own house is finished. In this companion to Everybody Cooks Rice (1991), Dooley evokes the warmth of a friendly, international neighborhood and includes recipes for each of the seven types of bread the families bake, several of which can be made quickly. Thornton's cozy pictures capture the faces found in the multiethnic neighborhood, and together the artist and the author make a rainy Saturday seem special. Susan Dove Lempke --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By thersites on December 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
This is generally a very good book - it's about a kid who goes from house to house in her neighborhood. In each house, a different national origin is represented (Indian, Salvadoran, Italian, Lebanese, etc.) and so the kid talks to each of them, they each are making a bread unique to their culture, and it's all done in a respectful and gently humorous way.

EXCEPT for one house. At that one house, the kid is rude to her ("What d'ya want?"), they don't speak grammatically (see above), the kid's sister shakes her finger at the protagonist and "hollers" at her ("leave that alone!"), and there is "loud music playing" that makes communication initially difficult. This one house? The African-American house.

When we read this book to our African-American 4-year-old, we, frankly, wince. Why does one, and only one, culture, have negative stereotypes presented with it?
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Reader Mom on January 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is a great book. I read it with my 2 pre-schoolers, and they love it. I disagree that it is not a bed time story. We read it anytime during the day. We have been making the bread at home as a project. The recipes are delicious (esp the coconut bread). I would highly recommend this book as an educational and fun book for children.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Owen on August 15, 2008
Format: Paperback
I loved how the character wanders through her neighborhhod and experiences a world of cultures. She gets to taste breads from all over the world. I feel it sends the message that although we are all so very different we are all still part of the same community.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I find that in life and literature food is an excellent way to get into other cultures. This book (and the others from this team prove it). As another reviewer mentioned, the way that the African-American's household is portrayed can be a bit grating. As they suggest in a later comment, I've been revising the tone of the few lines that bother me when reading to my nearly four year old. In context with the other stories, the family is perfectly nice.

This had no problem holding the attention of a nearly four year old, and he often pulls it out and asks for another read. While it can be a good bedtime story, it's a little long if you have a dawdler. I wouldn't do a first read at bedtime, since there are lots of questions, and it is a little long.
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