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Everybody Has Those Thoughts: So It Doesn't Mean You're Gay Paperback – August 29, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 56 pages
  • Publisher: RateABull Publishing (August 29, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0982713282
  • ISBN-13: 978-0982713280
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,835,182 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Cristian YoungMiller is an author and TV writer that became the first person to post a video on YouTube about jelqing. Later he posted other videos about sexual secrets that received over 3 million views. Since then he has gone on to publish multiple books on topics ranging for sexual advice to spirituality. His latest works are novels for those that like to laugh and be scared.

Cristian YoungMiller was born in the Bahamas and now lives in Los Angeles. He received his degree in Psychology from Beloit College and has worked as a writer, editor and producer for Disney, Vivendi Universal Games and other companies.

Customer Reviews

I would definitely recommend this book to parents to read to their kids!
Eric K
I also thought it was weird and just a little bit too Freudian that the main character, who is trying to figure out if he is gay or not, has a banana for a head.
Maranda Russell
Overall, this is a great story for kids to show them that "gay" shouldn't be a put-down or a cause for bullying and that it's not "gay" to hug your friends.
Lee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 21, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is the third book in a series by the very sensitive and intelligent and caring Cristian YoungMiller, a crusader for helping kids through difficult themes. In EVERYBODY HAS THOSE THOUGHTS SO IT DOESN'T MEAN YOU'RE GAY he creates a little novella about a father and son and the discussions they have about important topics.

Jack is a 13-year-old lad who is depressed because his friends have called him 'gay', a term he doesn't completely understand and a feeling about his dream world and his sexuality that he has not confronted. Jack is fortunate to have a fine father who, sensing there is something Jack needs to discuss, takes his son to the miniature golf course where they can jointly enjoy the game and provide time for communication. Jack finally has the courage to discuss a dream he had in which he kissed his friend Billy in a successful attempt to save him from an accident. He also relates a recent game of Truth or Dare in which Billy was dared to kiss Jack: the only problem for Jack was that when he stood for the kiss he had to hide an unwanted evidence of stimulation! This really opens a discussion about the spectrum of emotions that include same sex attraction and Jack's father offer a brief but understandable explanation of the work of Kinsey and the bell curve of human sexual response. The story ends with the father and son warmly finishing their miniature golf game with a strong and reassuring embrace.

Though some may disagree with YoungMiller's simplification of genetic propensity and the role of inheritance in sexual response, few will deny that he has provided a very wise manner for kids to understand the world of sexual proclivity - and a recipe for parents and all adults to approach the topic.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Courtney Kozack on October 21, 2010
Format: Paperback
Brilliant! Kinsey explained for 14 year-olds! This story beautifully captures the bafflement and frustration of a young boy dealing with the warring factions of his body and brain. YoungMiller clearly explains why our body goes through these changes while celebrating our differences as normal and good.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 15, 2010
Format: Paperback
Jack was really sad and upset and even though he was thirteen-years-old he headed to the swing set, a place where he felt comfortable. His father noticed his distress and called out, "Bad day, kiddo?" It really was a bad day and Jack really didn't know what to do about it. He confided in his father by saying, "Billy and Sandy called me gay." His father didn't want to hear that he had been bullied, but tried to reassure him that there wasn't anything wrong with being gay and also expressed the fact that it "wasn't very nice of [his] friends" to do something like that. He added that when he was younger his friends called him "soft."

He explained to Jack that is wasn't necessarily what someone can say to you, but how they say it. In this instance what they said was intended to hurt him and claimed "if someone is saying something about you that isn't true, it's not right, no matter what it is." Jack's father sensed that there was more to the topic that needed to be discussed so he suggested that they head to the miniature golf course to play a game. Even though it was hard for him to talk about it, Jack soon told his father what had happened. When he and his friends were playing Truth or Dare, Billy wanted to know what the "strangest dream" he'd ever had was.

Jack had been honest with his friends and told them that in this dream he had kissed Billy. As they played their game of mini-golf his father tried to explain why he had experienced that dream in terms that he could understand. He said, you "experienced something that made you feel that you had a close connection to Billy," but Jack told him that there had been more to the game that just divulging that bit of information.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Maranda Russell on November 24, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I liked this book ok and did think it tackled an important, current issue, but I did find it a little bit corny at times in the way gayness (or the lack of it) was presented. I also thought it was weird and just a little bit too Freudian that the main character, who is trying to figure out if he is gay or not, has a banana for a head. Could they have picked a more stereotypical, phallus-like fruit? I think it would have been better had the characters just been people and not fruit headed people.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By mathrick on January 20, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The book is a bit too happy to offer definitive and this-is-a-fact statements about things which are at best one of the many informed guesses we're able to offer about how the human brain and sexuality works. It's also too eager to state that this and that doesn't "mean you're gay", thus reinforcing the notion of objective validity of various labels. I would have liked it to do more to emphasise that there's no such thing as being "actually straight" or "actually gay" or any other orientation, and that any and all labels are only useful when they serve to aid expression of who you are as an individual, and not as standards to validate yourself against. It does a good job of introducing and explaining a useful (if slightly inaccurate) form of Kinsey scale, and mitigating the fear that any specific behaviour will make you catch gay cooties, but because of the above falls short of showing that gay cooties don't actually exist (unless you choose to embrace them, that is).

Despite these flaws, it's still very much a step in the right direction, particularly for kids likely to identify with the straighter end of the spectrum. It won't do much for flamboyantly gay or genderqueer ones, and I'd look elsewhere for those, but it will do just fine to assuage the fears of ones afraid of expressing emotions with their peers for fear of catching the gay.

PS. Half a star extra for "your mother's little legs".
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