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Comment: 2009 Zondervan Pub. pictorial hardcover. Thumb print smudge/scuff on first page corner. No writing or highlighting. Light tanning on page edges. Minor wear on cover edges.
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Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven, but Nobody Wants to Die Hardcover – November 7, 2009


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 271 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan; Revised & Updated edition (November 7, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310291917
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310291916
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (81 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #853,330 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven, But Nobody Wants to Die: Or (The Eschatology of Bluegrass)

The conflict between the here and now and the ever after is a familiar one. Death and life are forever intertwined, as a life lived to the fullest includes pain and grief. Even more, it requires dying to self, which frees one to experience a greater joy: community. Thus explains best- selling recording artist David Crowder as he explores the complex relationship between life, death, grief and community. Drawing from personal experience, Christian theology, the science of pain and the "high, lonesome sound" of bluegrass music, Crowder applies his often hilarious voice to an inspiring message—death is not the ultimate calamity ... it is just the beginning. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

David Crowder is the pastor of music and arts at University Baptist Church (UBC) in Waco, Texas, where he lives with his wife, Toni. He is also a part of the rock-and-roll extravaganza known as David Crowder Band (sixstepsrecords/EMI CMG).

Mike Hogan plays in the David Crowder Band and, although Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven, but Nobody Wants to Die is his first venture into the world of books, he has done a good bit of music writing for various magazines. When not on tour, Mike enjoys spending time at home with his wife, Robin, and his son, Walter.

More About the Author

David Crowder is the pastor of music and arts at University Baptist Church (UBC) in Waco, Texas, where he lives with his wife, Toni. He is also a part of the rock-and-roll extravaganza known as David Crowder Band (sixstepsrecords/EMI CMG).

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 81 customer reviews
David Crowder's other book, "Praise Habit," is also amazing.
Minas Tirith
Very witty, very intelligent, a little wordy but nonetheless a great read.
Anonymous
It makes you laugh, makes you think, and puts things in perspective.
Jessica

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Joanna Macellaro on January 8, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is absolutely amazing.
I got it for Christmas, and sat down and read the first half out loud with my brother. That's how awesome it is, we read that much in one sitting. :D
I took the book to a party with me 2 days later and we finished it.
People at the party were looking at me funny for sitting and reading a book about death and bluegrass instead of, say, eating cake.
But the eschatology of bluegrass, as depicted by David Crowder and Mike Hogan, is a lot better than cake.

I absolutely loved every part of it. Hilarious footnotes, IM conversations between Crowder and Hogan, and even a lawyer joke. My brother and I were laughing out loud (which caused people to look at us strangely also, oh well). Then suddenly there would be a story of the death of one of their close friends, or relatives, and we'd be trying not to cry.

Crowder and Hogan have an excellent way of writing; the entire book was captivating and beautiful. I think I'll be quoting from it until long after the cows come home.

Death can be a painful topic, one most people try to avoid, but everybody will encounter it at some point. This book, along with their AMAZING cd, A Collision, discusses death honestly and openly, which is quite necesary.
Good job, guys. :)
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Gina R. Crick on September 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
death needed to be discussed in this way. to be invited into their greiving like this helped. most people don't understand, and that can stand in the way. it is a book for people who love to learn, who love music and it's history, and who don't mind unconventional ways of thinking. it is for people who are grieving, who will grieve and need to know what that looks like. i found it's idiosyncrasies more in line with my natural thought life, and so that was comforting too. it is good. thanks to the authors for this book, and lots of grins and giggles too! you guys are crazy. (good crazy) i thoroughly enjoyed all of the footnotes.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mary Morris on January 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
I cried. I cried for Hogan when he couldn't. I cried for David when he was golfing and stupified. I cried for myself. Then I thanked God for giving me the understanding that came through this book. My jars of tears are finally flooding out. Give this book a chance; you never know how you could change.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Bensington on October 18, 2006
Format: Paperback
I'm a huge fan of David's previous book, Praise Habit; so I was very much looking forward to this one. Now, if you are looking for another Praise Habit, this isn't it. Don't get me wrong, I loved it. It was great in it's own write; but its just not a sequel. Now, on the other hand, if your looking for a good book that takes the emotional struggles of coping with loss and grieving and mixes it into a great big bowl, along with moments of intense inspiration, tongue in cheek humor and sarcasm, heart-rending sadness, ending in an awe-inspiring crescendo of hope (with intermitten appearances of parabolistic stories and im's); then you've come to the right place. It definitely has its place among those works that infuse us with the imagery that rages in the mind of the authors in times of trouble. I definitely recommend it. It does take effort sometimes to pull together the seperate threads that compose the whole of the idea that's being communicated sometimes, though...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By sla17 on January 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
David Crowder and his friends, whether in music or in writing, have a tendency to express the deep recesses of my soul which I thought to be inexpressible. This latest book is no different. With a little bit of something for everybody, it tackles the subjects of death and suffering head-on, and demonstrates the incredible community we as humans have as sufferers together here on the earth. By the end of the book, the authors' statement is clear: Death, you will not win. You may tear at our hearts and momentarily cripple our spirits, but the victory will not be yours.

In short, this book is a work of art, and it is beautiful.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By H. A Truett VINE VOICE on December 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
And so is his book. That makes it a perfect read for me. It kept me on my toes, filled me with all sorts of new information, made me laugh, let me feel like I go to know David and Mike a little more intimately, made me think and challenged my ideas on how books are written and read.

Definitely 5 stars.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lindsay Myers on January 20, 2007
Format: Paperback
"Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven" is both a book I want to recommend to everybody and nobody. Very much like the Crowder Band's concept album on death, a collision, it is both brilliant and uncomfortable. It captures your attention by marrying some apparently unlike subjects and synthesizing them in a way that makes sense more to the soul than to gray matter.

The primary arguments moving the book, the evolution of our understanding of the soul alongside the development of the musical form we now call bluegrass, are compelling. The discourse is informative (although the most oft cited source is the everpresent "W") but if the book were solely based on these chronologies of early neurologists and scotch-irish musicians I would not be recommending it to you. Now I must explain the concept of columns.

The first set of columns I got to in this book, I must admit, I was slightly perturbed by and all I could think was, "I'm reading this book the wrong way, anyone who looks at me will think I'm crazy." (Which is, in itself, quite a splendid idea.)But it's in these stories that the Crowder/Hogan team reveal the creative genius that has trademarked their music. This is true storytelling. In the narratives of these strangers the authors and their collective grief become so much more personal than even their autobiographical divulgence. It's in pebbles and nettles and blood and sin and forgetfulness and translations (brief=33 years, all the love in the world, He is holding you) and GRAVITY that this book devastated me. It's here that truth for which art is the only vehicle is unfolding too fast, too true.

There is a real abundance to this book. It equals more than IM conversations, columns, bluegrass musicology, and philosophical discussion of the human soul. It is this quality (phi) which makes this book sing in defiance of death and be soaringly resolute in proclaiming the hope of a soul that is really and truly alive.
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