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Everyday Justice: The Global Impact of Our Daily Choices Paperback – August 25, 2009


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Everyday Justice: The Global Impact of Our Daily Choices + What Would You Do? (John Howard Yoder Series) + Living Jesus: Doing What Jesus Says in the Sermon on the Mount
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Books (August 25, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830836284
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830836284
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #73,749 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Julie Clawson gets it. First, she gets it that most of us suburban Americans feel overwhelmed and guilty when we hear about justice. That's why she focuses on positive, doable ways that we can improve the justice quotient of our lives. Second, she gets it that we in the 'developed world' often have an undeveloped theology and lifestyle when it comes to key issues like fair trade, modern-day slavery, fossil fuel dependence, ethical eating and buying, and debt. That's why she gently, positively and hopefully helps us get 'development' where we need it most." (Brian McLaren, author/activist (brianmclaren.net))

"Many of us live in a world of great privilege. We also live in a culture of gluttony, and this includes our access to information, words and ideas. With the onset of technology and social media, my fear is that many of us will elevate our words and ideas--and be content and satisfied with that as our action. Everyday Justice is important for two very simple reasons: Justice is on the heart of God and justice needs to be pursued and lived out every day. Julie has given the larger faith community an important but inviting challenge: Do justice every day." (Eugene Cho, pastor, Quest Church, Seattle, and executive director, One Day's Wages, http://eugenecho.com and http://onedayswages.org)

"When I was a young Christian I was told that our job was to get people to heaven. The world (like now) was a mess, so evacuating people seemed like a good idea. What if instead I had been told that our main job was to bring the kingdom of God to our planet? What if that meant doing very practical things like advocating for people who were poor, voiceless and powerless? And what if I'd been told Jesus will only return when his followers have improved the situation for those people so much that it's finally become habitable for heaven? That's what I think now. If this idea intrigues you, read this book. It provides the how-tos." (Jim Henderson, executive director, Off The Map )

"Julie Clawson is a significant and much-needed voice in the emerging church conversation--actually, in any faith conversation. For those of us who have long felt her voice needed to be heard, Everyday Justice is a cause for celebration. Only someone who lives a life of social integrity is entitled to write such a book, and Julie is that person. She offers us hope that we can all contribute in a meaningful way to the transformation of our culture." (Marcia Ford, author of We the Purple: Faith, Politics and the Independent Voter)

"Living justly is an overwhelming task these days. How do I know whether the coffee I'm drinking was fairly grown? Or whether my jeans were made by a twelve-year-old? It's daunting, and we're tempted toward apathy. That's why Julie Clawson has done us such a service in writing Everyday Justice--in readable, compelling prose, she lays out the truth behind some of the products we use every day, and she gives us practical steps for living justly in a consumeristic age. She avoids guilt trips and writes personally. This book is needed and deserves a wide readership." (Tony Jones (www.tonyj.net), author of The New Christians: Dispatches from the Emergent Frontier)

"Every product in our consumer hands has a trail. . . . Julie Clawson skillfully and kindly helps us take seriously the call to justice in our everyday choices. From coffee to cars, there is a collision of economics and ethics that Christ-followers must take seriously. By refusing to make justice a liberal or conservative cause, she helps us participate in restoration, ethical consumption and the beautiful pursuit of justice in God's world." (Nancy Ortberg, author of Looking for God: An Unexpected Journey Through Tattoos, Tofu and Pronouns)

"Julie Clawson had me at 'Don't panic.' While many resources on social justice leave even the most compassionate souls and generous hearts frozen with an overwhelming panic from not knowing where to begin, Everyday Justice fires readers up and leaves them ready to change the world--starting right in their everyday lives. Clawson's well-researched and well-written book flows with stories of evil and good, monsters and heroes. It's a must-read for anyone who wants a deeper understanding of what loving our neighbors should look like." (Caryn Rivadeneira, managing editor, Gifted for Leadership, and author of Mama's Got a Fake I.D.)

"With both tenderness and everyday practicality, Julie Clawson invites all of us into a more complete way of following Jesus. By providing simple, concrete ways to seek justice in our daily lives, Everyday Justice is a great resource to get you started or keep you going on the journey toward acting justly, loving mercy and walking humbly with your God." (Will Samson, coauthor of Justice in the Burbs)

Review

"Julie Clawson gets it. First, she gets it that most of us suburban Americans feel overwhelmed and guilty when we hear about justice. That's why she focuses on positive, doable ways that we can improve the justice quotient of our lives. Second, she gets it that we in the 'developed world' often have an undeveloped theology and lifestyle when it comes to key issues like fair trade, modern-day slavery, fossil fuel dependence, ethical eating and buying, and debt. That's why she gently, positively and hopefully helps us get 'development' where we need it most."

More About the Author

Julie Clawson is a writer and frequent speaker on the topics of faith, culture, and justice. She has a MA in Intercultural Studies and Missions from Wheaton Graduate School and a MA in Religion from the Seminary of the Southwest.

Julie is a huge sci-fi/fantasy geek, wannabe foodie, theology nerd, social justice advocate, and board game fan. She lives in Austin, TX with her family.


She invites you to visit her blog (julieclawson.com) and join her in conversation there. She is available to speak and lead workshops on the topics of Christian faith, social justice, and popular culture and spirituality.

Customer Reviews

This is a well written, easy to read book.
ShoozieQ
Everyone should read this book to realize how what we buy effects people around the world and the changes we could make to improve the lives of others.
Joanne Carter
I don't know whether I should be pleased or disappointed that I was already familiar with earth saving ideas brought out in the book.
NurseChar

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Man in the Middle VINE VOICE on October 8, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really wanted to love this book, because I'm very much into many of the same goals in my own life. Raised our son with cloth diapers, for example. Drive a Prius, when we drive at all. Caring deeply about helping the poor, both here and abroad. But having a degree in economics myself, I just can't get past the pervasive economic ignorance in this book.

Almost every page assumes that whatever horrible thing is happening to the unfortunates who grow our cotton, grow our coffee, sew our T-shirts, assemble our shoes, etc. in various poverty-stricken countries would magically heal if only we stopped buying such products. The author retains this view even while pointing out how, for example, when Disney was confronted about clothes it sold being reportedly made in a Haitian sweatshop, it "solved" the problem by moving the business to an even worse factory in China. I'm fine with blaming Disney for not living up to its desired image as child-friendly. But how are now out of work Haitians better off after the change?

Thomas Sowell, in his excellent book Basic Economics: A Citizen's Guide to the Economy, Revised and Expanded Edition asks the question "And then what?", meaning whenever we advocate an economic change, we should first think how that change will play out over time. That, in short, is what I do not see happening in this book.

One happy story is how Nike has helped those who make its shoes, not by taking its business elsewhere, but rather by monitoring its suppliers to be sure they treat their employees fairly. Apple too responded effectively last year when questions arose about conditions in a Chinese factory making Apple products.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Laurel Dixon on September 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
Martin Luther King Jr. writes in From Where Do We Go From Here, "All men are interdependent. Every nation is an heir of a vast treasury of ideas and labor to which both the living and the dead of all nations have contributed. ...We are everlasting debtors to known and unknown men and women. When we arise in the morning, we go into the bathroom where we reach for a sponge which is provided for us by a Pacific islander. We reach for a soap that is created by a European. Then at the table we drink coffee which is provided for us by a South American, or tea by a Chinese or cocoa by a west African. Before we leave for our jobs we are already beholden to more than half the world....We are inevitably our brother's keeper, because we are our brother's brother. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly."

Julie Clawson addresses exactly what Martin Luther King Jr. speaks of here in her new book, Everyday Justice. Clawson's book brings thoughtful reflection and awareness to some of the most profound and obscure breaches of justice that plague the world today. Some of the topics Clawson includes are the injustices found in coffee, clothing, and cocoa production, the car industry and the impact of oil consumption upon the environment, and even the rampant amount of waste created by a consumer society. The target audience of the book is the Christian living in America. Clawson claims that the Christian, who desires to follow the lessons of Christ and the principles of social justice within Christianity, must start to become aware and take responsibility for how consumption choices contributes and sets the stage for many of the human rights atrocities in the world today.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Notton on October 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
Everyday Justice challenged me to become a more ethical consumer, based on biblical mandates for justice. If you've been running in social justice circles for a while then some of the topics in this book might be familiar (child slavery in the manufacture of chocolate, or fair wages for coffee farmers). However, Julie does cover some new ground that is both important and significant (more on that later...).

However, one other thing that sets this book apart is its strong reliance on the Bible for supporting why it's important to think before you buy. In that respect, I would highly recommend this book for people who don't see why it's important to consider where the things they buy come from, or who choose what to buy based purely on finding the lowest price. The book explains that everything we buy is made from something and by someone, and it's manufacture, distribution, and disposal have consequences on the environment which in turn directly impacts someone, somewhere. It challenges us to look both ways along that stream to see the face of those who are impacted and make choices that honor them as beloved children of God. Then, as much as we are able, it challenges us not to be complicit with injustice, whether that be through paying unfair wages, misusing resources, or otherwise exploiting other people. It's not easy, but often it's possible to find alternatives to the current mainstream options, or to advocate for changes to the existing system.

The book discusses both real solutions and real dilemmas that are confronted when trying to make changes. Through personal examples, Julie gives us a framework of examples for choosing among the "lesser of two evils".
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