Everyday Use (Women Writers) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.95
  • Save: $2.59 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Everyday Use (Women Write... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Some water exposure, all text is readable. Some underlining and highlighting. Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Everyday Use (Women Writers) Paperback – June 1, 1994


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$22.39
Paperback
"Please retry"
$23.36
$7.77 $3.15

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$23.36 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Everyday Use (Women Writers) + A Good Man Is Hard to Find and Other Stories
Price for both: $34.63

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Today Only: Up to 80% Off Popular Summer Reads on Kindle
Today only, get books by Jhumpa Lahiri, Brad Meltzer, Amy Tan, Jane Green, and more at up to 80% off. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press; 1st edition (June 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813520762
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813520766
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #232,543 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Alice Walker (b. 1944), one of the United States' preeminent writers, is an award-winning author of novels, stories, essays, and poetry. In 1983, Walker became the first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for fiction with her novel The Color Purple, which also won the National Book Award. Her other books include The Third Life of Grange Copeland, Meridian, The Temple of My Familiar, and Possessing the Secret of Joy. In her public life, Walker has worked to address problems of injustice, inequality, and poverty as an activist, teacher, and public intellectual.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Shazia on October 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
I think this book's imagery is amazing, and really gives you the perfect picture of the characters. Alice Walker did a great job "weaving" this story and showing us different kinds of African Americans and the heritage that is passed down with family traditions and quilts. This is definitely worth a read to all people, African American or not because we all can relate to the emotions the characters feel. This story is about a mother who was always torn between her two daughters and finally learns how to take a stand. Read it and enjoy!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jael SIgala on April 11, 2015
Format: Paperback
Everyday Use by Alice Walker Review

Alice Walker writes a very well described 1st person short story from the mothers point of view of her daughters Maggie and Dee. This story is non-fiction but could be based on a true story. The story doesn't give a time period but it is clear that it takes place in more than a decade ago probably in the mid 1900’s. Set in a humble african American home with a farm where Maggie and Dee’s mother works really hard like a man to support them. The story starts off introducing Maggie and the mother as they prepare for the arrival of Dee whom they haven’t seen since she left college. Maggie does not seem excited for her sisters visit but seems nervous and wants to hide behind her mother's chair. Dee has always been better at things than Maggie, she is prettier, confident and it seems like the world has never learned to say no to her. Maggie gets nervous with Dee’s presence not because of hatred but merely of fear of her.
Maggie is soon to be married with John Thomas a man with mossy teeth and an earnest smile. Her mother is at peace and will be free to simply live her live singing church songs. Her daughter Dee was eager to go to college leaving behind her family and the house she always hated. Eager to live a different life where she could have nice things and all things fashion because she knew all about that. The mother at times imagines her daughter Dee becoming famous and being reunited with her on a tv show where in front of everyone she would be all fake and smiles giving her mother hugs and kisses saying she would never have gotten so far without her.
This story starts off describing the setting and the superficial events.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Juan on April 11, 2015
Format: Paperback
The name of the story that I am about to summarize is “Everdyday Use” by Alice Walker. The Story was published in 1973 in the short story collection, In Love and Trouble. It is a story that is narrated by a character that is in the short story who is called “Mama”. The story is about a mother who describes the day when her older daughter came to visit her and her sister, but she was not the same anymore, life changed her and now she is more selfish. The Story starts with Mama describing her two daughter and the differences the have.

Mama starts talking about her daughter and the way the are and how was the relationship of them when they were younger while waiting for the arrival of Dee, the older sister that does not live with them anymore. One of her daughters, Maggie, is a very shy person that feels intimidated by her older sister Dee who has a very different personality, thinking that she deserves a better life. Mama is expecting to have a awesome meeting between both of them but when Dee arrives everything is very different at what she was expecting. Dee has changed a lot even she changed her name because she does not want her mother heritage anymore so she adopted a name of her boyfriend’s heritage. The main point of the story is when Dee wants the quilts that Mama was saving for Maggie, Dee argues that she will take care of them instead of Maggie because Maggie will not give them the proper use all this was happening while Maggie was listening to all the conversation between her mother and Dee, Maggie feels kind of sorry and try to give the quilts to her sister but her mother do not allow her to do that.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Melissa Rivera on April 10, 2015
Format: Paperback
“Everyday Use” by Alice Walker is a non-fictional story that discusses the perspective on culture appreciation. It tells the story of an African family consisted of mom, and her two opposite daughters: Dee and Maggie.
When the sisters were little, their home was burnt. Walker narrates how mama carried Maggie on her arms while her face was being disfigured by the fire. Now, as they both await the arrival of Dee, mom believes that the scars in Maggie’s face had made her less of an achiever than her sister. Dee is described as a loud person. Everything about her screams confidence, her words, bright dress, and her whole being. Along with Dee comes her boyfriend, who appears to practice Islam.
Her mom wonders if Maggie feels threatened by the success her sister has. Dee tells her sister and mother that she has changed her name because she does not want to feel encased to a prejudiced culture that has nothing to offer. Despite that, she sees her grandmother’s handmade quilts and wants them as a gift to decorate her house. Mama then remembers that she had promised them to Maggie, but gives them to Dee believing that Maggie could make some more. In that moment, she realizes that she has been oppressing her own daughter, takes the quilts from Dee, and puts them on Maggie’s lap. Dee leaves the place stating that her mom and sister do not know how to appreciate her culture and are not well tied to their roots.
This story is very thought-provoking. I thought it was hypocritical how Dee kept implying that she was so connected to her culture and not only she changed her name to one that would allow her to live differently, but she wanted to use a very precious family object as decoration. I like that this story is applicable to people from all races.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Everyday Use (Women Writers)
This item: Everyday Use (Women Writers)
Price: $23.36
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?