Everything But the Burden and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.00
  • Save: $2.02 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Good readable copy. Worn edges and covers and may have small creases. Otherwise item is in good condition. Ex-library book. May have typical labels and markings.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Everything But the Burden: What White People Are Taking from Black Culture Paperback – September 9, 2003


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.98
$10.24 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Everything But the Burden: What White People Are Taking from Black Culture + Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom (Harvest in Translation)
Price for both: $40.32

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Broadway Books (September 9, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 076791497X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0767914970
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 5.4 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #936,985 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

There's an old remark to the effect that if you toss a Harvard boy in a locked room with a ghetto kid for a month, well, who'll come out sounding like whom? This collection, edited by Village Voice critic Tate (Flyboy in the Buttermilk), attempts a sociology of that transaction, as repeated perpetually throughout American culture. Contributors including Carl Hancock-Rux (on Eminem), Hilton Als (on Richard Pryor) and Renee Green (on a complex of film and social theory) advance considerations more specifically directed than Norman Mailer's classic "The White Negro."
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

How does the majority, dominant, power-holding culture appropriate elements of the disenfranchised minority culture? In myriad ways, according to this collection of new essays edited by Village Voice writer Tate. From Picasso and Pollock to Steely Dan and Eminem, the white imitation of black ways has profoundly "colored" Western culture. Despite the book's subtitle, this work is as much about the varied emotional and intellectual responses of black thinkers to this phenomenon as it is about cultural appropriation per se. Ranging from Hilton Als to Jonathan Lethem, the contributors include professors, artists, musicians, and writers, and their essays embrace research (on the Left and the "Negro Question"), theory (on the primal history of thugs), and personal reflection (whether an impassioned account of sexual jealousy or reserved observations on James Brown and Malian youth), plus snippets of verse and drama. The degree of formality in the language varies enough to be distracting. The collection's stylistic diversity and idiosyncratic selection of topics create a provocative, if rather trying, reading experience. Recommended for substantial academic and public collections on race and American culture.
Janet Ingraham Dwyer, Worthington Libs., OH
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

2.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 41 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 21, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I had very high hopes for this collection--so high, in fact, that I kept hoping that it would get better all the way to the last essay. The first and main problem, I think, is that this is a topic better dealt with in a book-length and coherent manner. Oddly, though, I found "Race Matters" by Cornell West much more satisfying than this book even though that, too, is a collection. Perhaps the topic of black cultural influence needs at least a coherent idealogy within a collection of essays in order for a book to address it properly. Either way, this collection lacks a cohesive theme, and also a discernible sense of the problem. Because the essays deal with different aspects of white appropriation (and some, like the essay discussing "kinky afro human hair" don't seem to touch on white appropriation at all), a clear discussion of the issues surrouding white appropriation is impossible.
The second problem I had with this collection was the emphasis on anger--as discernible from indignation, a sense of irony, or irritation. I have never felt that emphasizing rage or race hatred is a productive method of dealing with racial issues, and I maintain my position here. Race is already an emotional issue, and I feel that a book exploring white appropriation of black culture should (1) explore the causes for such appropriation, (2) analyze the emotions that such appropriation elicits throughout the black community--and the white community, and (3) perhaps suggest possible ways to use white appropriation to raise the socioeconomic position of blacks as a community. This book emphasizes step (2), wih almost nothing of (1) and (3), and further almost exclusively highlights anger as the prevailing emotion.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By César Chávez on January 28, 2011
Format: Paperback
The intriguing title of the book raises hopes that one will have the opportunity to learn about how whites have historically taken advantage of blacks by using their unpaid labor and appropriating their various extraordinarily artistic and cultural accomplishments, while at the same time lacking sympathy to their plight of poverty and racism. The essays in this book, however, largely fail to address this issue. One essay in particular stands out: a white author long describes at length the bullying he suffered at the hands of blacks in his youth, then in the last paragraph mentions how his brother is a rapper.... please.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
greg tate's "everything but the burden" is a wide ranging collection of literary essays most of which deal convincinglyand several quite brilliantly,with the subject at hand- how white folks appropriate and misappropriate black culture.
the writer attributes the book's title to his mother who "once wrote a poem called 'everything but the burden'" in which she railed against white people's wanting everything culturally identifiable as black---but the burden.
my personal favorites among the essays are the ones by the brilliant writer and editor greg tate; fashion stylist michaela angela davis' poignant piece on growing up black and beautiful but not sure of being either; historian and jazz scholar robin b d kelly; writer and etherealist latasha n diggs satire on her satirical fetish for asian men ; and a breathtakingly informative and analytical piece on musician james brown's cultural influence on post- colonial west african youth by author/filmmaker/scholar manthia diawara.
an altogether welcome addition to the increasingly important writings about what"burden" contributor and artist/cinematographer arthur jafa calls the "post-soul culture".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 17 people found the following review helpful By LastAngelofHistory.org on April 30, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Tate's anthology is so badly needed that if it didn't appear, someone would have *had* to invent it. Why? The answer is simple. Black cultural nationalism is not simply an historical relic. It is a smart, vital 'movement', not the hyper-masculine, homophobic monolith it is routinely assumed to be. It has taken on new shapes & forms. At a time when Black neo-cons & neo-liberals, with the support of the majority of US body politic, are punitive anti-essentialists, asserting that all cultural production is a result of 'hybridity', the writers in this book are not afraid to point out, in a nuanced and intelligent manner, that white people are still taking whatever they like from Black cultures, and leaving the hard work to Black people. Filmmaker and sub-rosa genius Arthur Jafa's mindblowing essay, 'My Black Death' is a brilliant polemic which responds unequivocally to the book's assertion. If this crucial book fails to convince readers that Tate and the contributors are not kidding around, consider the (fairly) recent incident in which Eric Clapton, while observing the late Eddie Kendricks in a studio session, asked the engineer if he could go into the studio and look down Kendricks' throat, believing there was a *physiological* *thing* that would explain how Kendricks' was able to sing in the way he did. Consider why beloved English 'techno' heroes 808 State, in an interview with a UK music paper, said that, for them, making dance music invented in Chicago & Detroit by Black people, was the "the white kids' revenge". Urban legends? Heard/read from a source wholly unconnected to the events? No.Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?