Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fine book on an enigmatic artist
I must congratulate Mr. Brody for his in-depth examination of one the the great auteurs of cinema, a man who has consistently defied convention and created a body of work unlike anyone else in his profession.

Writing about Jean Luc Godard in an exercise in exasperation because the director is deliberately elliptical, leaving his films, methods and aesthetic...
Published on November 24, 2011 by Cliff Burns

versus
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars All the things ...
"(Richard Brody's) Everything is Cinema", famous French philosopher Bernard-Henri Lévy is quoted as commenting on the back cover, "is better than a biography, it is a novel". Fiction, in other words. I prefer to invoke the title of a Charles Mingus composition, viz "All the things you'd be by now if Sigmund Freud's wife were your mother": Over nearly 600 pages,...
Published on June 25, 2012 by Dr René Codoni


Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fine book on an enigmatic artist, November 24, 2011
By 
Cliff Burns (Western Canada) - See all my reviews
I must congratulate Mr. Brody for his in-depth examination of one the the great auteurs of cinema, a man who has consistently defied convention and created a body of work unlike anyone else in his profession.

Writing about Jean Luc Godard in an exercise in exasperation because the director is deliberately elliptical, leaving his films, methods and aesthetic open to discussion and varied interpretations. Branded, alternately, a fascist sympathizer, a communist, an anarchist and everything in between, Godard continues (to this day) to work at his own pace, exploring the themes that fascinate him without apology to critics, colleagues or even his most devoted followers and acolytes.

It is very easy to look foolish when discussing an artist as fluid, ever-evolving and unabashedly personal as Godard, but Mr. Brody's book treats its subject with finesse, subtlety, erudition and respect.

A superb meditation on a cinematic master.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Yes, but..., September 21, 2008
By 
Richard Patterson (Los Angeles, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The thing that struck me as I read this was that Brody seems more enamored of the idea of what he thinks Godard was doing as an artist than he is with the actual films he made - at least with the films he made during the first decade or so. Colin MacCabe's Godard: A Portrait of the Artist at Seventy seems more readable and more able to see the films as something other than opaque autobiography. Needless to say either book will tell you more than you ever wanted to know about Godard's personal life, although MacCabe, unlike Brody, shows some reticence in exploring his love life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars must have on godard, September 9, 2009
By 
Donna Nueva (new mexico,usa) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
if you love godard, you must have this book,by THE NEW YORKER film reviewer, richard brody.he offers an insightful biography of godard, and his influences, the reviews are in chronological order, and are MUST READS, after watching the dvds. his treatment of BREATHLESS is packed with information and astute observations. it is absolutely amazing that BREATHLESS was godard's first film. keep this book by your dvd player!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thorough and Detailed, January 12, 2009
An excellent overview of the life and work of Godard. Although some may quibble at elements of Brody's approach, it would be impossible to write a book on Godard that pleases everyone. Brody's work is an interesting companion to Colin MacCabe's biography, published a few years back. Read both, watch the films and Godard will mean what he means as you stare out from within your human skull.

Dark Windows
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars All the things ..., June 25, 2012
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
"(Richard Brody's) Everything is Cinema", famous French philosopher Bernard-Henri Lévy is quoted as commenting on the back cover, "is better than a biography, it is a novel". Fiction, in other words. I prefer to invoke the title of a Charles Mingus composition, viz "All the things you'd be by now if Sigmund Freud's wife were your mother": Over nearly 600 pages, page by page, precisely and adoringly, emerges the profile of a total neurotic, a mysogenist misanthrope, a miser.

A bit of a private life component may be the spice of a biography, but if nothing else but his private (ie off-screen) life is advanced to determine and explain all of Godard's films and video activities, the reader tires rather quickly: In the end, Le mépris (1963) is an excellent and intelligent film because Alberto Moravia's underlying novel is great (sociological rather than psychological) analysis, and Godard a skilled and innovative metteur en scene.

Some things are irrelevant, like his failed alliance with a relatively more mature Marina Vlady - Anne-Marie Miéville, the author rightly remarks, will be the first and only of Godard's women of equal caliber. And whether Godard held hands with Brigitte Bardot walking up the stairs of Curzio Malaparte's avant-gardist villa is about as irrelevant as his "accusation" of François Truffaut of having had a candid affair with Jacqueline Bisset during the turning of La nuit américaine (1973), and not showing it in that movie... ("how come only the director has no affair in that film?").

Brody's method of endless narration makes it difficult for him, and subsequently the reader, to in any defined way assess the weight/quality of Godard's individual films. This is perhaps the main weakness of the book. Also, it contains a series of factual errors in the assessment of the bitter feud with Truffaut, which (as can be read up in the latter's many biographies) was basically instigated by Godard's vile and foul sneering. Truffaut was not the only one who got that treatment, but he is the one who most decidedly stood up against the intellectual smear campaign.

Not an easy subject; a wealth of material, well written without any doubt, but still: not going anywhere in particular.

fbus 37 - Everything Is Cinema: The Working Life of Jean-Luc Godard by Richard Brody - 26/6/2012
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything Is Cinema:The Working Life Of JLG - Richard Brody, October 12, 2008
Excellent portrait of JLG & the complexities & foibles of a person driven
to question the very form of filmaking. Thoroughly engrossing read, written in an easy flowing style without the inflections of worship or prejudice. A primary source for the understanding of a demanding intellect & a fascinating insight to private life/public art manifestation. Thoroughly recomended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 22 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A reverse-shot: biographical reductivism and a rhetoric of defamation, May 14, 2009
Source: [...]

i would have preferred this post to be titled "Kinbrody and the Ceejays", similar to its source, but the said would do. The form as much as the content matters, as all JLG fans know. "Sliced and diced like a package of subprime mortgages," Brody's feat fails on both counts.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Everything Is Cinema: The Working Life of Jean-Luc Godard
Everything Is Cinema: The Working Life of Jean-Luc Godard by Richard Brody (Hardcover - May 13, 2008)
Used & New from: $10.95
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.