Everything They Had: Sports Writing from David Halberstam and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$2.85
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by AZ_Fulfillment
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: [Lightly Used Paperback. Possible light wear to cover. No markings in text but may be name or dedication inside cover. Expedited Shipping Available]
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Everything They Had: Sports Writing from David Halberstam Paperback – Bargain Price, May 12, 2009


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, Bargain Price, May 12, 2009
$3.73 $2.85
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion; 1 edition (May 12, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401309909
  • ASIN: B002KHMZO0
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,247,382 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Halberstam was one of America's most distinguished journalists and historians. After graduating from Harvard in 1955, he covered the beginnings of the Civil Rights movement, then was sent overseas by the New York Times to report on the war in Vietnam. The author of fifteen bestsellers, including The Best and the Brightest, he won the Pulitzer Prize for his Vietnam reporting at the age of thirty. He was killed in a car accident on April 23, 2007, while on his way to an interview for what was to be his next book.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
5
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 13 customer reviews
A sports fan should find this an interesting and enjoyable read.
roland swanson
His great strength was using his knowledge of history and politics and placing his sports stories within these larger contexts.
bronx book nerd
Enjoying the wide ranging collection of short stories and articles written by David Halberstam.
E. King

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Franklin on May 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is a very solid collection, and a reminder of what a talented writer Mr. Halberstam was. The themes he would turn into books can be found throughout the essays. He was, it seems, most interested in the combination of race, the media, fame, and friendship. There is a certain weight toward his more recent writings (much of it available online through espn.com and other sites). Certainly worth reading, and for those of us who found Halberstam to be the most gifted writer who happened to write about sports, it is a must have book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By CJA VINE VOICE on September 2, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Halberstam was an even more prolific writer than I had thought, as demonstrated by this collection of his short sports pieces published in various magazines over the years. The collection demonstrates his keen eye for the cultural changes mirrored in sport and his appreciation for character. As for the latter, the portrayals of Ted Williams, Joe Torre, Reggie Smith, Muhammad Ali, and Pat Riley are excellent.

Two pieces on basketball are exceptionally strong -- a 1985 article about Indiana high school basketball (with some Bobby Knight mixed in) that captures the State's passion for basketball and the changes in society and sport since the 1950s. Another excellent piece concerns Halberstam's friendship with a little known basketball player who was part of the North Carolina team that beat Wilt Chamberlain and Kansas in the 1950s and who had a brief stint in the NBA.

Many of the pieces explore male friendships and bonding in the context of sports. Halberstam does not delve much into the darker side of sport, perhaps getting his fill of that in his political writing.

Some of the pieces in the collection are a bit superficial and lack the depth of research and passion that gave so much life to Halberstam's longer works. They smack of taking a break and making a quick buck.

On the whole, a worthwhile collection.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Greality Test on January 13, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This collection of essays from various magazines spans more than two decades. It reflects on fathers and young sons going to their first pro baseball game together. It covers how youngsters become involved as sports fans and fanatics. It explains how a boy can be a Yankees fan, or a Sox fan or even both, and why. It discusses how baseball is suited well to radio, and football to television. Women's ice hockey is given a good analysis. I haven't started the fishing section. Halberstam is very much an observer of people and personalities, many from more than fifty years ago. An excellent purchase.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. J. Snyder on January 14, 2009
Format: Hardcover
In a number of these essays, Halberstam shows us why he was the best chronicler of our times of the intersection of sports and society, and all the different angles that complex and convoluted connection had.

He reminisces about sports and adolescence, takes several looks at triad of race/sports/society, gives his take on lesser as well as "major" sports and more.

It's also a gift of Halberstam the craftsman. The essays range from just a couple of pages long to 10 or more. So, Halberstam practices his writing craft in several different ways.

Finally, often for better, occasionally perhaps for a bit worse, you get a look at how a magazine journalist, and former newspaper journalist, practices the art of recycling stories, or of turning the same interview or event into three different articles for different publications.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By bronx book nerd VINE VOICE on August 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
David Halberstam was perhaps better known for his books on history and politics, He was also a great sportswriter. This collection of essays demonstrate the breadth of his knowledge as well as his keen insight. His great strength was using his knowledge of history and politics and placing his sports stories within these larger contexts. His major premise was that sports precedes the larger society in key cultural changes. His biggest case for this was racial integration, where it occured first in baseball before it was made law later for the rest of society. As Halberstam touched on various sports and personalities, from baseball, to basketball, to boxing, for example, he repeatedly gave texture to his individual and group tales as he recounted how the sports phenomema impacted the larger culture. There is a great sense of nostalgia in his writings, particularly when he covered some of the less popular sports, like fencing or women's hockey, where the lack of big money and media attention retain a level of purity not found elsewhere. There are also fascinating historical bits, like how coach Frank McGuire and a bunch of Irish Catholic and one Jewish player from New York turned college basketball into a virtual religion in North Carolina and other parts of the south, or how basketball became a way of life in Indiana, given the weather and its rural demographics. Halberstam also weaved into his stories perspectives on male bonding, father and son relationships, and brother-to-brother issues, and how these can be affected and faciliated by sports. All-in-all, this should be a satisfying read for any sports fan.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bookworm Plus on October 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover
In "Everything They Had," we get the lighter side (in the best sense) of David Halberstam. A noted Pulitzer winning journalist and writer of contemporary history, he also wrote many books and articles about sports such as baseball, football, basketball, and fishing. Sports were the fun part of his life as a writer. In fact he noted that taking time for his sports projects were his way of taking a sabbatical. This shows in the sheer love and wonder he displays through half a century of sports writing. At times, I felt as I was reading an autobiography. Not being a professional sportwriter, Halberstam was able to pick and choose his subjects. Through his writing from the 1950's to the new millenium we see the rise and role of sports in America against the backdrop of the sociological and technological changes. Halberstam describes the rise of the NFL, the continual hold of baseball in the hearts of America, and the excitement brought by the NBA. We also gain insights into personal sports Halberstam loved such as fishing and rowing. Halberstam does not always present a rosy picture, but "Everyting They Had" is the work of an optimist and a man who looked for the best. It is not an all inclusive anthology as many sports such as Ice Hockey, Golf, and Motor Sports are left out. However, this compilation is Halberstam's story of a part of his life's journey and the writing quality is wonderful and memorable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?