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Everytime We Say Goodbye

From the Album My Favorite Things
June 1, 2013 | Format: MP3

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5:45
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: February 27, 1998
  • Release Date: February 27, 1998
  • Label: Rhino Atlantic
  • Copyright: 1960 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International outside the United States
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Duration: 5:45 minutes
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00122WM9M
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #73,865 Paid in Songs (See Top 100 Paid in Songs)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard Fitzpatrick on November 18, 2010
This is simply the master at his best. Cole Porter's "Everytime We say Goodbye" is somewhat overlooked because of the artist's elevation of 'My Favorite Things" from saccharine to the near sublime in the album with that same title. Coltrane's 13:41 treatment of "My Favorite Things" is an eye-opener to jazz fans who regard it and the rest of the "Sound of Music" score as pretty, but second-rate from a Richard Rogers/Oscar Hammerstein collaboration that was in decline. No doubt, Coltrane's treatment of "My favorite things' rescued it from obsolescence and secured it a place in the jazz repetory. Still, the Cole Porter's "Everytime We Say Goodbye" is much the superior song. Start with the lyrics that are Porter at the top of his game--
Everytime we say goodbye, I die a little,
Everytime we say goodbye, I wonder why a little...

"When you're near, there's such an air of spring about it...
There's no love song finer, but how strange the change
from major to minor,
Everytime we say goodbye.

Coltrane's soprano sax (which he rarely played) has a haunting sound--almost like a French horn--to evoke the wistful lyrics. Coltrane is is accompanied by a young McCoy Tyner on piano, who also contributes a definitive solo. Indeed, for five minutes and 39 seconds "there is no love song finer" than this masterpiece written by Cole Porter and played by John Coltrane and his group.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Caponsacchi HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 9, 2012
I have no trouble subscribing to the view that--along with Pops, Duke, and Bird--John Coltrane was the most seminal, influential musician in jazz. But his most important and enduring recorded work is found on his albums before 1960, above all his work with Miles (on both Prestige and Columbia, with "Kind of Blue" remaining the most iconic, successful jazz album of all time) and "Giant Steps" (admittedly, a musician's album but one that enabled us to see pop song harmonies and progressions in an entirely new way).

"My Favorite Things" and "A Love Supreme" were his best-selling albums post-Miles, reaching listeners far beyond the usual jazz following. Soon after "A Love Supreme" McCoy and Elvin would leave the group, and John would leave some of us dumbfounded (and sporadically deaf) by his interminable screeching contests with Archie and Pharoah. (I stayed it out, though I saw him empty the Madison Student Union Theater on one occasion and Soldier's Field on another.)

Though John on these occasions was after something extra-musical, extra-terrestrial and spiritual if not rapturous, he could still be highly respectful of the great American standards, as we heard in his Ballads albums and his session with Johnny Hartman. For this reason his apparent insecurity about the melody for the last 8 bars of the Cole Porter song, "Every Time We Say Goodbye," is hard to explain. I'm even surprised McCoy didn't coax him through it the 2nd time, because you can sense John is tentative at this point and needs a nudge or two. Had he followed Dexter Gordon's famous advice ("Learn and be able to recite the lyrics of the standards you play!
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By Grace T. Daniel on December 23, 2013
Verified Purchase
I chose this item thinking that it was light Jazz. This CD is for Jazz fans who may appreciate over indulgence of this artist. Not the light romance mood I expected.
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