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Evolution of Racism: The Human Differences and the Use and Abuse of Science Hardcover – July 1, 1994

ISBN-13: 978-0671754600 ISBN-10: 0671754602

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Shipman, coauthor of The Neanderthals , has written an accessible history of the attempts of scientists, from the mid-19th century to the present, to grapple with issues of race. From Charles Darwin's wide-ranging explorations of evolution emerged fellow Briton's Thomas Henry Huxley's applications to human history. By the late 19th century, Herbert Spencer seized on Darwinism to argue for laissez-faire government. Darwin's cousin, Francis Galton, proposed the idea of eugenics: advancing the species through careful breeding. From eugenics came intelligence testing, used in the early 20th century to the detriment of immigrants to America and eventually by Nazi science. Shipman tracks the continuing controversy in the 1950s and 1960s about whether to examine or deny racial difference and discusses at much length a proposed but canceled 1992 conference on genetics and crime. This thoughtful study warns that treating race as a taboo subject hinders legitimate scientific investigation of differences among humans.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Shipman, coauthor of The Neandertals (LJ 12/92), is quickly becoming one of the better popular science writers working today. Here she traces the intertwined history of evolution and racism from the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of the Species to current controversies over genetic links to violent behavior. Despite the title, the story focuses more on the history of race as a scientific concept than on the misappropriation of such concepts by political leaders and social crusaders. As a result we learn much about the scientists involved in the debate but only a little about the use and abuse of science by nonscientists. Still, Shipman's book is clearly written and very accessible. A valuable addition to most libraries.
Eric Hinsdale, Trinity Univ. Lib., San Antonio
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (July 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671754602
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671754600
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.5 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,298,304 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 2, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Creationists can be funny (See below). But this is no laughing matter. Pat Shipman, and other scientists, should be applauded for taking a stand against pseudoscience, not belittled. Kudos to Shipman for writing such a wonderful book.
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11 of 17 people found the following review helpful By sam on May 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Shipman begins her book with Darwin and reflects on his struggles in presenting "The Origin of the Species" as he understood the controversy it would unleash. It is remarkable that the controversy has not abated in over a hundred years, but has instead evolved as delineated in the book. Shipman's work should be required reading for students in a variety of disciplines to give them the tools to defend against the henchmen of pseudoscience such as Rushton and Kevin MacDonald. Shipman reflects on the complexities of evolution and of human differences while making it clear that the human experience is diverse, and the use of science to support racism is not good science by any measure. This book is need badly in an updated version to uncover the flawed arguments of the newly prominent racists who are sheltered by academia.
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5 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 2, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Alas a writer who acknowledges that evolution implies racism and selection of the superior race. Politicians have been trying to suppress this, but they will fail in the end, as evolution wins. You cannot stop nature.
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