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Evolution: The Story of Life on Earth Hardcover – January 4, 2011


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Hill and Wang; First Edition edition (January 4, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0809094762
  • ISBN-13: 978-0809094769
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #641,391 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Featuring the same amusing characters as those found in Mark Schultz's The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA, Hosler's sequel does for natural selection what its predecessor did for human genetics. The intrepid Glargalian scientist, Bloort 183, has returned and serves as the book's principal narrator. This time he has invited King Floorsh 727 and Prince Floorsh 418 on a tour of the newly opened Glargalian Holographic Museum of Earth Evolution. Hosler (Clan Apis; Sandwalk Adventures) is also a professor of biology and provides readers with much more than a simple graphic primer on evolution. With the Cannons' wonderful illustrations providing a visual anchor, Hosler discusses everything from the atomic to the planetary, from endosymbiosis to mass extinction. The book, like its predecessor, may be too dense with information--for instance, the 54 million years of the Cambrian period is covered in a mere six panels. However, readers should find at the end of their journey through Bloort's Holographic Museum that they've learned a tremendous amount about earth's evolution, and have had more than their fair share of amusement in doing so. (Jan.) (c)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Back to the watery world of the sea-cucumber-like species Squinch for another course in the elements of life on earth. In The Stuff of Life (2009), Squinch scientist Bloort 183 convinced King Floorsh 727, by explaining genetics, that becoming sexual may be how the asexual Squinch can avoid impending extinction. Now he continues the exposition by disclosing the wonders wrought by genetics plus time. For this lesson, the king is joined by the heir apparent, precocious little Prince Floorsh 418, whose good questions and inspired intuitions keep Bloort on his . . . are they tentacles? It’s hard to imagine instructional science cartooning better than this. The Cannons (who are unrelated, by the way) keep every creature they’re called upon to depict—be it cell, dinosaur, dodo, or Darwin—perky but never ridiculous, and Hosler, like Mark Schultz in Stuff, balances science and humor superbly. Complete with glossary, this delightful book seems ideal for nonscientists who want to entertainingly brush up their knowledge of evolution as well as for students from middle school on up. --Ray Olson

More About the Author

Academic History
2000-Present Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Juniata College

1996-2000 NIH Postdoctoral Fellow, The Ohio State University Rothenbuhler Honey Bee Research Laboratory

1995 Ph.D. University of Notre Dame, Biological Sciences

1989 B.A. cum laude DePauw University, Honor Scholar with Distinction, Biological Sciences

Courses
Neurobiology (BI450)
Invertebrate Biology lecture (BI350) and lab (BI351)
Sensory Biology (non-majors Biology course; BI142)
Chemistry/Biology Lab -Chemical Sensing (BI289)
Organic Evolution Lecture (BI339)
General Biology Lecture (BI111)

Academic Awards:
2001 -2004 William J. von Liebig Summer Research Grant
1997 - 2000 National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Health
1998 Xeric Grant to publish Clan Apis, a comic book on honey bee biology and natural history
1989 Albert E. Renolds Senior Biologist Award, DePauw University (1989)
Undergraduate Research Students:
2003- Present Katey Glunt, William J. von Liebig Summer Research Fellowship, Blocking and generalization: the role of odor functional groups in odor-odor blocking interactions.

2002-03 Cathleen Hewlett: Goldwater Award Recipient, William J. von Liebig Summer Research Fellowship The role of histamine in honey bee olfactory learning

2002 -03 Brandi Whetstone: William J. von Liebig Summer Research Fellowship, Odor Generalization and Blocking in Honey Bees

2002 -03 Amy Skibiel: The physiological basis of changes in swimming behavior of the amphipod Gammarus minus by the parasitic acanthocephalan Polymorphus.

2000-2001 Charles Gilman. Immunohistochemical localization of histaminergic cells in the honey bee antennal lobe.

1998-1999 Kristi Buxton: Impairment of Olfactory Discrimination by Blockade of GABA and Nitric Oxide Activity in the Honey Bee Antennal Lobe. Ohio State University

Publications
Hosler, Jay S., Buxton, Kristi L. and Smith, Brian H. (2000). Impairment of Olfactory Discrimination by Blockade of GABA and Nitric Oxide Activity in the Honey Bee Antennal Lobe Behavioral Neuroscience 114 No. 3 pg. 514-525

Hosler, Jay S. and Smith, Brian H. (2000). Blocking and the detection of odor components in blends. Journal of Experimental Biology 203, 2797-2806

Chandra, S., Hosler, J. S. and Smith, B. H. (2000). Heritable variation for latent inhibition and its correlation to reversal learning in the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Journal of Comparative Psychology 114, No.1, 86-97.

Hosler, J. S., Burns J. E., and Esch H. E. (2000). Flight Muscle Resting Potential and Species-Specific Differences in Insect Chill-Coma. Journal of Insect Physiology 45 No.5 pg. 621-627

Books
Clan Apis (2000) by Jay Hosler. The life of a bee told in comic book form. 160 pg. Active Synapse, Columbus, Ohio. ISBN 0-9677255-0-X
The Sandwalk Adventures (2003). Darwin, Evolution and Follicle Mites. Active Synapse, Columbus, Ohio. ISBN: 0967725518

Meeting Presentations
Whetstone, Brandi and Jay Hosler (2003) An Odor generalization Matrix for Apis mellifera. Poster, Annual Meeting of the National Council for Undergraduate Research

Hewlett, Cathleen and Jay Hosler (2003) The Effects of Histmaine of Olfactory Memory Consilidation in Apis mellifera. Poster, Annual Meeting of the National Council for Undergraduate Research.

J.S. Hosler, Smith, B.H., K. Buxton, (1998). GABA- and Nitric Oxide mediated modulation in the honey bee (Apis mellifera) antennal lobe differentially affect olfactory discrimination. Poster, Annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, Los Angeles, CA

Hosler, J. S. and B. H. Smith (1997). An analysis of olfactory blocking. Poster, Annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, New Orleans, LA

Hosler, J. S. and B. H. Smith (1997). An analysis of conditioned inhibition. Poster, Regional meeting of the Animal Behavior Society, Columbus, OH

Hosler, J.S. & H.E. Esch.(1995). The Effects of Temperature-Dependent Shifts in Resting Potential on K+ Channel Function in Drosophila melanogaster Flight Muscle. In Nervous Systems and Behavior. Proceedings of the 4th International Congress of Neuroethology (pg. 141). Edited by M. Burrows, P.L. Newland & H. Schuppe. George Thieme Verlag, Stutgart, New York

Hosler, J. and H. Esch (1993). Response characteristics of Drosophila melanogasterpotassium channels at low temperatures. Poster, Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Indianapolis, IN

Hosler, J. and H. Esch (1992). The effects of temperature on the electrophysiology of Drosophila potassium channel mutants. Poster, Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Baltimore, MD

Popular Media Features
NewYork Times. Pow! Splat! Take That Darwin Disparagers! Arts and Ideas: Think Tank, Saturday, November 30, 2002

Chronicle of Higher Education. Darwin's Talking Mite. Notes from Academe by Lawrence Biemiller. June 13, 2003

Associated Press (National). Professor Aims to teach science through comic books by Dan Lewerenz

London Times Higher Education Supplement, Creationists put in their place by the mite of Darwin... August 8, 2003

Discover Magazine Review of Clan Apis by Corey Powell, Senior Editor. February 2000, pg84

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette King Bee: A professor by day, he creates a buzz as a daring cartoonist By Tom Gibb, Feature in the Magazine section of the Sunday, February 03, 2002

Altoona Mirror. Abuzz about bees by Jay Knarr, Sunday July 15, Life section

Guest on 15 Minutes with Steve Jones on WPSU, public television out of State College. The topic of discussion: Clan Apis and The Sandwalk Adventures.

Service and Professional Development
Chair, Curriculum Committee (2003- )
Curriculum Committee (2001-Present)
Enrollment Management Committee (2001-02)
Event Supervisor (Life Science Processes), National Science Olympiad, 2004
Event Supervisor (Life Science Processes), PA Science Olympiad, State Competition (2001-02)
Illustrator for Association for Women in Science Magazine (1998-Present)
Program of Emphasis (POE) Sub-Committee (2001- Present)
Invited Lectures
Using comics in the Science Classroom. 2004 Natioal Science Olympiad and 2004 Pennsylvania Governor's Institute for the Life Sciences (2003

"Unlikely" Companions: Science and Sequential Art. Pennsylvania Governor's Institute for the Life Sciences (2003)

Playing with Sequential Art. Family Night presentation, Huntingdon, PA County Library (2003)

Passionate Science. Summer Undergraduate Research Students, Juniata College (2003)

The Liberal Arts Scientist Science Scholar Recruitment Weekend, DePauw University (1992)

Flight Muscle Resting Potential and Species-Specific Differences in Insect Chill-Coma.Denison University (1997)

No NO is a no-no: The Role of Nitric Oxide in Olfactory Learning Kenyon College (1998) Bucknell University (1998), Macalester College (1999)

Merchants of Light: The Biologist as an Emissary of Science Juniata College Tri-Beta Induction, (2000)

Why Bees Rule Juniata College Environment Studies Seminar series, (2000)

Odor based responses in the Insect Antennal Lobe DePauw University (2001)

The olfactory world of bees Huntingdon County Beekeepers (2001)

Why Bees Boogie and Other Tales From the Hive Juniata Alumni Weekend Class, June 7, 2001

Honey Bees and Brain Gas Juniata Bookend Seminar, October 10, 2001

Clan Apis: The Natural History of a Cartoonist Huntingdon, PA Public Library
Professional Memberships
Society for Neuroscience
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS_
National Council for Science Education (NCSE)
Council for Undergraduate Education (CUR)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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The only gripe I have with the book is the lack of colour.
Forgot My Ginkgo
If books like this existed when I was a kid, I didn't know about them, and I spent benighted decades preferring magical answers to actual science.
Greg
Does a great job of summarizing concepts of evolution in an interesting presentation that is a quick and easy read.
L. Sherer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Greg VINE VOICE on January 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Using the same framing device as The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA (aliens discuss the subject, giving an "outsider's" perspective and an excuse for lots of explanation and examples), "Evolution" depicts the theory using historical snippets, wise and wonderful illustrations, and cutting-edge information. While the target audience might be the 10- to 16-year-old set, this middle-aged man, well-versed in evolutionary science basics, found a lot to love in this book. For one thing, it's just super-cute a lot of the time. And while technically I didn't learn anything really new in it, seeing ideas I already grasped presented in fresh, captivating ways makes them feel new again.

I suppose that's what "Evolution" does for me. If books like this existed when I was a kid, I didn't know about them, and I spent benighted decades preferring magical answers to actual science. This book, with its great information and frankly kind of juvenile presentation, helps make me feel more like a kid again, making old discoveries for a first time. That's some real magic.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Supernova on January 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover
It's a comic book explaining how evolution works, in a story that will intrigue children while teaching them. An excerpt from the book can be seen in this Scientific American article: [...]
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Anonymous on February 12, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a great book for anyone who is interested in learning more about how the world around them works, but is daunted (or bored) by the more traditional textbooks of the classroom. Through its narrative framework and captivating illustrations, this book makes the more technical, elusive details of biological processes and evolutionary mechanisms relatable, imaginable, and ultimately knowable. It's packed with information but fun to read. Definitely worth it.
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Format: Paperback
When you make science this entertaining and this approachable, it becomes exponentially simpler to grasp. Jay Hosler, an associate professor of biology at Juniata College, is to be commended for taking the graphic format and pushing it to its fullest in Evolution: The Story of Life on Earth. If you ever doubted comics' potential to teach complicated subjects and render them approachable, look no further.

It of course helps that Hosler knows his material quite well, but it's also beneficial that he's got a great sense of humor, so none of this scientific exploration becomes too dry. It's funny and clever, and Hosler manages to cover an incredible amount of material throughout the book's 150 pages, discussing all manner of life forms on earth and how they all got to where they are now.

He's ably assisted by the illustrative team of Kevin and Zander Cannon, who got their feet wet with The Stuff of Life before really knocking it out of the park here. As great as Hosler's knowledge and wit can be, they would fall decidedly short if not for the Cannons' enticing artwork and ability to cram so many panels on a page.

This is a book that would be a great addition to a high school science class, as well as school libraries. For that matter, adults wishing to brush up on evolution and learn how it's been proven, over and over again, would find a great resource here.

Reviewed by John Hogan
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Timothy W. Lieder on March 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I also think that I was never very good at science because I might be too fascinated with it. I mean, it's kind of hard not to think about billions of years of development leading to different ways for bacteria to adapt and change and not feel just a little overwhelmed with the whole picture.

This book is a great introduction to evolution (and I may never get over the introductory phase) with plenty of information about biology, genetics, natural selection and other evolutionary topics. I love the way it manages to correct pre-conceived notions about evolution (like the believe that evolution is a natural progression to the better when it really is about adapting to the environmental conditions).

The only problem I had with this book was the way that the author chose to frame it with cute aliens telling the story. There are way too many asides to the cute kid alien saying some point with the cute tutor alien being a complete toady. This stuff is cute but a little goes a long way and this book tends to get too cute.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By hargikas on February 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you ever want to learn about evolution in your spare time this is the book for you! A nice, humorous comic book that travels through the story of life in earth.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kris on February 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover
A great piece of informative fun. The book balanced well the flow of information about the subjects, without going so far in a direction that regaining the general thread would pose any difficulty. It gives a very nice presentation of the general subject of evolution and invites further exploration into its aspects.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By NewEnglandBob on February 9, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a terrific book for young teens up to adults who want to learn evolution by natural selection and the history of life on earth. It uses clear language to explain evolution in a medium-detailed way, breaking the subject up into chapters that a young knowledge-seeking mind can grasp. Having read more than half of the "Suggested Readings" at the end, I can say that list can take the reader deeper into the marvels of evolution.
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