Evolution of the Word and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.99
  • Save: $10.01 (33%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by giggil
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Evolution of the Word: The New Testament in the Order the Books Were Written Hardcover – August 28, 2012


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.98
$13.32 $3.33


Frequently Bought Together

Evolution of the Word: The New Testament in the Order the Books Were Written + Living the Questions: The Wisdom of Progressive Christianity
Price for both: $35.20

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 608 pages
  • Publisher: HarperOne (August 28, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062082108
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062082107
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (104 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #96,153 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“The most helpful thing that Borg has to offer is a contextual introduction to each of the 27 books of the New Testament . . . An eminently readable and eye-opening addition to religion shelves, as well as a new and fascinating way to read the New Testament.” (Booklist (starred review))

“Borg, a prolific biblical scholar, guides the reader into understanding . . . the process by which the biblical material developed. . . . A good guide to the background and content of the New Testament.” (Library Journal)

“Marcus Borg has always been a great teacher. In his newest book Evolution of the Word, his teaching skills are obvious as he opens the New Testament, not only to its original, historical order, but also to insightful, refreshing and dramatic insights.” (John Shelby Spong, author of Re-Claiming the Bible for a Non-Religious World)

“Borg introduces each book of the New Testament and, for the first time in most churches, readers will be receiving these sacred texts in the order men and women received them nearly 2,000 years ago. . . Evolution of the Word will light up book discussion groups.” (Read the Spirit)

“Some may still remember confrontational front-page headlines decades ago pitting Borg and other university-based Bible scholars against Christian traditionalists. However, Borg now is embraced in mainline congregations coast to coast. . . . To put it simply: Marcus Borg has become a friend to growing congregations.” (Read the Spirit)

In Evolution of the Word, Borg has produced something of great usefulness. Reading the New Testament in the order suggested gives us a new perspective on biblical faith. …[It] tests and challenges our programmed ways of reading Scripture…. that can enrich our faith awareness. (The United Methodist Reporter)

From the Back Cover

Everyone knows the New Testament begins with the Gospel of Matthew, but how many know Matthew was actually one of the later books to be written? (It wasn't even the first Gospel!) But Evolution of the Word is not your typical New Testament.

Marcus J. Borg, esteemed Bible scholar and bestselling author, shakes up the order of the New Testament as we know it by putting the books in a completely new order—the order in which they were written. By doing so, Evolution of the Word allows us to read these documents in their historical context. For the first time, see how the core ideas of Christianity took shape and developed over time.

Borg surveys what we know of the Jewish community of Jesus followers who passed on their stories orally. Into this context emerges the apostle Paul, whose seven authentic letters become the first collected writings that would later become the New Testament. Borg offers helpful introductions for each book so that as we read through these biblical documents, spanning over a century in time, we see afresh what concerns and pressures shaped this movement as it evolved into a new religion.

In this groundbreaking format, Borg reveals how a radical and primitive apocalyptic Jewish faith slowly became more comfortable with the world, less Jewish, and more pre- occupied with maintaining power and control. Evolution of the Word promises to change forever how we think about this historic work.


More About the Author

Marcus J. Borg is professor emeritus in the philosophy department at Oregon State University, where he held the Hundere Chair in Religion and Culture, and author of the New York Times bestselling Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time, The Heart of Christianity, The Last Week, and Jesus. He was an active member of the Jesus Seminar when it focused on the historical Jesus and he has been chair of the historical Jesus section of the Society of Biblical Literature.

Customer Reviews

I highly recommend this book for any layperson who is serious about Bible study.
Elizabeth Cunningham
Evolution Of The Word is unique in that Borg rearranges the books of the New Testament in the chronological order he believes they were written.
Ian MacReach
Borg writes a very interesting book from a chronological perspective that makes one think and that is a good thing.
B. J. Morris

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Greg Smith (aka sowhatfaith) on September 19, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
By placing the books of the New Testament in the order they were written, Evolution of the Word invites readers to experience how early Christian thinking evolved over the eight decades during which the twenty-seven books were written. Borg uses the introductory section to offer a succinct overview of the historical approach that is commonplace in academic study and which guides his work. He then introduces each book with two to eight pages that provide data about the how he selected the most likely date the book was written, its historical context, and its significant content and themes. Borg follows the introductions with the biblical text from the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV).

Those who seek to follow the way of Jesus will find their journey enriched by reading, pondering, and responding to Evolution of the Word. Whether Borg's historical approach is new and novel or the only known option and normative, actually reading the New Testament text as he presents it invites the reader to read the words as if reading them for the first time.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
60 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Dubious Disciple on September 15, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is a big book, 593 pages, but over half of it is a reprint of scripture. After an introduction, Borg goes book-by-book through the New Testament, providing a few pages of overview for each, primarily discussing its historical context, and then presenting the Biblical text. Borg's contributions are a little sparse and offered without much argument, so if you're looking for exhaustive commentary, that's not his purpose.

Also, do not imagine that scholars have some kind of universal agreement about when each of the N.T. books were written! Borg humbly admits there is no consensus, and in places, admits his opinion differs from the majority. In general, Borg dates many of the books just a little later than I do. For example, he follows the recent trendy dating of Luke/Acts well into the second century, while I remain unconvinced and still date these two books around 85-95. And, of course, we won't agree on Revelation, since in my own book I rely heavily on a historical-critical interpretation to place its date right around the year 80 CE, which differs from almost every New Testament scholar.

But while there's no exact consensus, that's not really the point. The point of Borg's book is to portray how Christianity evolved in its earliest years, as evidenced in the writings we have in our Bible. Indeed, the New Testament itself is an evolutionary outgrowth of the Old Testament. Quite a bit of the discussion centers on Paul, and on the letters written in his name, as this is where the most serious change occurs over the span of the New Testament ... issues like the role of women in the church and of how to regard Christian slaves like Philemon.

Overall, I enjoyed the book but found few surprises, and the reading went fast since I didn't take time to reread all of the scripture.
65 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Cunningham on October 10, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have taken many Bible study classes over the years and so I was aware of the fact that Paul's letters were the earliest Christian writing available to us and the general chronological order of the four gospels. However reading them in order, along with Borg's very readable commentaries, was eye-opening. I was most impressed by what Paul did not say about Jesus and how the Christology and theology of the New Testament developed over the years from the earliest writings to the latest. I highly recommend this book for any layperson who is serious about Bible study.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By MauiCris on October 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have been savoring this book since I received it a few weeks ago. The Biblical part of it is familiar and comforting as in any Bible. Having the books and letters in the order in which they were written opens a landscape and context in which to read the familiar words. Also, having Borg's introductions gives historical and social information that helps open the readings to new interpretations and insights. I didn't think having the New Testament in chronological order could be as significant as it has become for me. But I find it has given me a new understanding of the rise of Christianity. Valuable book. I highly recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Scott Dietz on October 10, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
At the (Baptist) bible school I once went to (and elsewhere) it's understood that the Bible is the `Word of God'. There are a lot of tortured explanations for how it came to be written. "Did men write it?" you might ask. And the Bible school staff would probably answer something like "...Well, yes and no. The spirit of God wrote it, or inspired men to write it (and by men they mean men, not the more vague reference to mankind)", so it's pretty much perfect and error free, just the way He would want it to be. Sure, this doesn't stretch credibility quite as far as say, Joseph Smith and a certain set of golden tablets, but you still have to wonder about that `no mistakes' bit. In any case, when Jesus was supposedly making the rounds on the preaching circuit, he didn't have a new testament. And when Paul was making the rounds, planting churches here and there, he didn't have a new testament either...in fact he didn't even have any of the Gospels, which is what this book by Borg makes pretty clear.
Borg hasn't come up with anything new here and his notes aren't exhaustive, so basically what you have is another printing of the New Testament. But reading the New Testament in chronological order ...I don't know, it kind of makes a profound difference...it emphasizes how the `Word of God' is a disparate collection of human documents ...makes you aware of historical context ...highlights how Jesus and his message have been interpreted over time, and suggests how that message may have changed from its origin.
I'm really enjoying this treatment so far.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search