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401 of 423 people found the following review helpful
I have read most of Wayne's books, and this was one of the better ones. I used a highlighter on many areas of the book: I love Wayne's style of intertwining great philosophical quotes, anecdotes and personal stories to illustrate his points.

The book starts out citing compelling science and studies, including Bruce Lipton's research proving that genes are far from destiny, and that our beliefs influence even our genes. This is truly the foundation for a "no excuses" paradigm. Wayne delves into the concept of memes, or mind viruses and explains how these are passed on to people like cold viruses.

Next, 18 typical excuses are presented (many of these solicited from his readers). It will be difficult, risky, take too long, create family drama; I don't deserve it; it's against my nature; I can't afford it (surely a popular one today!); no one will help me; it's not happened before; I'm not strong/smart enough; I'm too old/too young; the rules/laws won't let me; it's too big; I don't have the energy/time; it's in my family history; I'm afraid. I was disappointed that my favorite excuse "I'll do it later" wasn't listed, although it was addressed indirectly in various parts of the book, especially in the "commitment to overcoming the inertia" part.

The second section seven contains principles for overcoming excuses: awareness, alignment, now, contemplation (with a very powerful quote from Aristotle--"Contemplation is the highest form of activity"), willingness, passion and compassion.

The third section promotes a new way of viewing excuses, creating a paradigm shift. This includes asking yourself six questions, starting out with "Is it true?" Where did the excuse come from? What is the payoff?" These are very reminiscent of Bryon Katie except that instead of undoing beliefs, you are undoing excuses and eradicating them from your subconscious mind (which Wayne argues need not be beneath your consciousness, and in fact renames as the "habitual mind").

I see people all the time using these excuses to avoid eating a better diet of more raw foods: It will create family drama; I don't have the time to fix good food; I don't have the money to buy fresh produce." My father's excuse was, "I am too old." Unfortunately, he died of cancer two years after using that excuse!

I am confident that this book will inspire people to take a new look at their habitual mind patterns, breaking free to move on to their highest potential!

Susan Schenck, author of The Live Food Factor: The Comprehensive Guide to the Ultimate Diet for Body, Mind, Spirit & Planet
and
Beyond Broccoli, Creating a Biologically Balanced Diet When a Vegetarian Diet Doesn't Work
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62 of 66 people found the following review helpful
As an old-school management kind of guy, where excuses are not allowed, I didn't find anything overly earth shattering in this handy little guide to making yourself accountable...to yourself. However, it's still a good resource and certainly worth reading. I really enjoyed it, especially since it alligns with my way of thinking. Self-affirmation is good.

The author, Dr Wayne Dyer, put together his material in a very well-organized manner and was kind enough to remind everyone that their lame excuses won't cut it. I must confess, I have used a few of them myself, primarily to justify my laziness about not wanting to work out. However, I'm still not going to work out. I'm just not going to make excuses anymore. There. I feel better already.

By forcing yourself to increase your awareness level concerning any difficult issue you may be faced with, you'll more than likely come away accomplishing a lot of things you didn't think you could do, or didn't want to do. Again, this is basic stuff, but it's still valuable, especially for those less than enthusiastic chronic complainers who always feel the world is against them. You know the type. Everything is "a problem"...You just want to slap them. Well, now you can hand them this book, and hope they can fit it into their busy schedule.

In the final analysis, you've got to be your own boss. Give yourself frequent "reviews", and be honest with your own performance. If you're not cutting the mustard, go back and read this book again.

It's worth it, especially if you usually begin every day wondering what's going to go wrong and who's going to plot against you now. Yeah it's definitely worth it.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on June 19, 2009
I could not disagree more with the post that slammed Wayne Dyer or the concepts in this DVD or other materials of the title. The intention of this is clearly to remind people that we have control of our own lives and destiny - if we will only remember that and take it. Yet society and the habits and behaviors we inherit or learn teach us to believe otherwise. Others are sometimes the source or our pain, or they may choose to inflict it upon us (intentionally or unitentionally) but it is what we do with that and how we react to it that determines if we will stay stuck there in the problem, or if we will rid ourselves of it and move on to become everything we are capable of becoming. It seems to me that it is much better for us to decide how we will deal with and fix the issues instead of staying in a place of just blaming others or outside circumstances. I would say that anyone who truly wants to get past thoughts and excuses that limit them would appreciate this DVD and gain from it.
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36 of 41 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon December 26, 2009
I think I may have read too many Wayne Dyer books. They're all starting to run together and sound the same.

Great start for a beginner who hasn't been "Over-Dyered"

It's also becoming tiresome that authors from Hay House recommend each others books (a lot) inside their own book.
Infomercials inside a book.
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133 of 164 people found the following review helpful
on June 29, 2009
First of all, I have all the respect and admiration for Wayne Dyer. I love his work and his style and the man has been an inspiration and a role-model for me. Having listened to almost all of his audio materials, which I can heartly recommend, I decided to finally buy a book of his.

I have to say that I am disappointed with "Excuses Begone!". In itself, it is not a bad book at all. To give some credit, this book has Wayne's honesty and principles in it and if one was to apply the hundreds of advices in there I am sure there will be a positive effect. But overall this book does not stand to the high expectations I had from Wayne.

What repelled me, was the cheap repetition of "Excuses Begone" which looks like he tries to create a mantra or something. Also it seemed that Wayne has adopted some of the "mainstream" terminology of the self-help movement, something I didn't expect from him. For example the terms "subconscious", "programming" and so on, which is not bad and I certainly understand why he did it, although I didn't like the style of the text. It seemed uninspiried and usual, although the ideas a very good but nothing original.

All this doesn't matter a lot to me, because this is a book about changing habbits. Well, the approach Wayne took with self-inquiry and self-investigation certainly was something I like. What I didn't like is the execution. At the last part of the book where he is supposed to get practical (and ideas a practical, no doubt about that) he continues to repeat those old concept in the same way as before - with no original commentary or some new point of view.

I am sorry but this book seemed very usual to me. Maybe it would be great as introduction to people who haven't read much in this field before, but for the more read it has nothing new to offer.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on October 20, 2009
Perhaps these tapes just came at the right time, but they resonated. I have heard some of the messages before, but many of the affirmations bear repeating and the new ones were welcome. Just when I would get bored, Dyer would hit me between the eyes with a message that somehow had a personal coda. And I do not agree with one of the other reviewers about the eastern/western anything goes message. I just heard personal acceptance and love of oneself. There are people out there who have low self-esteem and others who are so harsh. I think Dyer might have just have been encouraging acceptance.
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43 of 52 people found the following review helpful
on August 9, 2010
This book reminds me of an excellent book called "The Magic Of Thinking Big" by David J. Schwartz. In TMOTB, Schwartz talks about "the disease of excusitis" that prevents you from thinking big and from achieving your dreams. I hate to say it, but it almost looks like Dyer took this chapter from TMOTB, added a bunch of his stories about some spiritual people from history, and made a book out of it.

I like Dr. Dyer, but all these new age people are really beginning to annoy me when they rehash other people's work and call it a spiritual awakening. I'm not writing this out of hate or maliciousness. I'm doing it in the spirit of fairness and justice to give credit where credit is due.

Peace
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80 of 101 people found the following review helpful
on July 2, 2009
After spending several months ready Dr. Dyer's previous book, Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Life, I expected Excuses Begone to provide similar profound insights. Two chapters in, I found myself bored by platitudes and new age hyperbole, and began to skip sections in an attempt to find the heart of the book. What I found was that this was the heart of the book. My whole opinion of Dr. Dyer has changed and I now question the content of his previous books I've read. I only hope he moves away from this commercial trash and gets back to what he does well.
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31 of 38 people found the following review helpful
on August 11, 2009
I'm a huge fan of Wayne Dyer. I love the 'content' of this audio program, but I hate the way it's presented. What bugs me the most is how he has hundreds of these affirmations he wants you to memorize and repeat to yourself over and over again. Fine, I can do that. The problem is, each affirmation is about 3 paragraphs long and the only way you can memorize these is by stopping the CD and either writing each word down, or listening to each affirmation about 50 times. I've been listening to this on my hour long commute to work, but I never got to the end of the program because I just get too irritated listening to it. I need to read the book and learn it that way.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
First,I want to applaud Dr Dyer for his choice to actually *live* the Tao. His book on that was life changing for me. I enjoyed the Power of Intention immensely also, and also love his work way back to "Real Magic". So - I started reading this book - and, I get mad because it seems like a rehashing of every other book - but then I'll find myself really liking something I just read. Just seems like he tried to cram waaaaay too much into this book. And, I can't help but ask myself "is he under contract to write X number of books a year or something?" Because, here's my thought - if you really are living the Tao (which I want to believe he is), then wouldn't you at some point think "I've done my duty - I've given the information people can use, it's time to LET IT REST?".
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