Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on July 1, 2010
I have read literally all of Dale Brown's books and have never been so disappointed, as I am with Executive Intent. When I saw it in the book store, I bought it without reading its reviews on Amazon first. I took one for the team this time.

Although the book starts out with the usual Brown style by creating a real world scenario with increasingly dangerous situations for the main characters and our country, Brown seemed to lose interest and in my opinion rushed to a conclusion without the details of a final battle. I was left with the feeling that a sequel is in the offing. If and when the next book is published, I will dutifully read its reviews first.

Fellow readers; wait for this book to be added to the shelves of your local library.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
I just finished reading Dale Brown's latest techno-thriller, "Executive Intent". I have always been in awe of Dale Brown because I spent 27 years in the air force and I can relate to the systems which he describes in his books. The truth be known, I wrote nonfiction proposals for companies, many of them dealing with technically oriented subjects. I can describe technical subjects to an audience who is familiar with the technology but Dale Brown's gift is the ability to describe these subjects so that lay people can grasp them and understand.

This book, more than others I remember, also deals with the personal and political interactions of the senior leadership of the country as they deal with political and military threats to the security of the United States and the world. He does a great job with describing the political intrigue but his descriptions of his protagonists flying in space and in the atmosphere while engaging in hazardous situations is unparalleled.

Mr. Brown keeps you on the edge of his seat as he describes air to air engagement s between Chinese and US navy pilots, and Russian and US Air force pilots. Then there are the descriptions of actions undertaken in space and the explosion of an unmanned satellite (caused by Russian and Chinese intervention) with a crew of a space plane nearby who had just completed maintenance on the satellite.

Mr. Brown starts this book, as he does many of his books, with real world news reports and web blogs which demonstrate that the futuristic aircraft and space technology is closer than we think.
The only problem I had with this book was a gap between the next to last chapter and the last chapter where obviously a great deal of action and political intrigue had taken place. There was, in my opinion, room for about three more chapters.

Overall this was Dale Brown at his best. I liked his move to including more political suspense in to the story. A great read and I wholeheartedly endorse this book to others.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on July 1, 2010
I believe I have seventeen or so Dale Brown Novels in my bookcase and most of them I really enjoyed. However, as Brown has advanced Patrick McClanahan to retired general status, the stories have become just a bit uncomfortable and implausable for me. The American Holocost was where I decided that I had gone as far as I could with the techno wizadry and Brown's version of the world. I had hopes that this latest book might be a return to something like the earlier times. What I got was a dash of this and a dash of that. We have a new president who has outlooks much like the current one we have and a female Secretary of State who has a very large agenda. At least Brown didn't have to dream those two up. The Vice President is one which we could really use right now, however.

In this book, China and Russia are conniving to get the US out of using space as a defensive weapons environment and they are doing a very good job of it as the president doesn't want to do anything to antagonize or stand up to our adversaries. I won't divulge how this crisis is dealt with, but I will say it is highly unlikely in the real world.

Three stars means "It's OK." And it is. It just isn't what we used to get from this author.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on April 19, 2011
I have read and enjoyed all of Dale Brown's books, but this book just ends. I was horribly disappointed at the lack of a proper conclusion like we always have received. I actually looked at the book to see if pages were missing.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Dale Brown has been writing aviation (and now space) themed thrillers since 1987 when he authored the classic "Flight of the Old Dog". Many think he has never equaled that effort. Regardless, Brown has churned out about 20 techno-thrillers, many featuring the very durable rogue General Patrick McLanahan, techno wiz billionaire Jon Masters, a very cooperative former US President Martindale, a rotating cast of incompetent, corrupt politicians and literally armies of bad guys around the world.

Typically, Brown can be depended upon for two things: 1) lots of techno wizardry on the ground, in the air and lately in space; and 2) lots of violent, rousing action. Politics have played a larger and larger role in recent Brown offerings and this time they are actually center stage.

We have a new President, Joseph Gardner, who is a "globalist" and "world citizen" kind of guy who feels all that ails the world can be cured by the United States being less "aggressive". His Secretary of State is a woman of unbridled ambition and loose virtue.

The new President has decided that adding more aircraft carriers is the way to assure America's continued dominance and protection of the world's oceans. That means no additional money for a space weapons system that has been underway for some years.

China and Russia observing the weakness of American foreign policy decide to increase their sphere of influence.

And that's where the action - what there is of it - is.

Unlike most Brown novels, most of the focus is on politics of various kinds. International relations. The tensions between the military services. The policy differences between the military and its civilian leadership. Shifting alliances between nations, the fecklessness of the United Nations.

Yes, there are a few combat sequences and a couple of them are edge-of-the-chair tense, but the almost constant combat of earlier novels isn't there and may be missed by many.

There's a lot of space-based techno-wizardry involved and that's a lot of fun.

The Chinese and Russians are tough adversaries and Brown, as is usual, piles in a lot of known facts about their growing military capabilities.

General Patrick McLanahan hovers in the background this time around and plays a relatively small, but critical, part in the adventure. One gets the feeling that McLanahan is being edged into the background.

Overall, while not as action filled as other Dale Brown adventures, this one is well plotted and moves quickly. But it is dangerously close to being more of a political thriller then a techno-thriller. Adrenalin junkies may not enjoy it as much as some of Brown's other novels, but I like it.

Jerry
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on June 23, 2010
This is not a techno-thriller, rather it is mostly about a bad politician. The reader spends most of his time hating the President and his failure to see and deal with the obvious. You must wait until the final few pages for the bad guys, foreign and domestic, to receive their just rewards. Who can say why Brown revised his formula of major confrontations with the good guys using their high tech aresenal to prevail? I think this novel should just be avoided, it is a disappointment.
Larry Brodsky
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on March 14, 2011
I have searched high and low for a writer of this type of story since the jack Ryan plot line ended with Tom Clancy. Now i have found the Patrick McClanahan led stories by Dale brown and know I have found a new favorite. Mr. brown creates very likable characters as he details a scary scenario we certainly could face in the near future if it is not already true.

Everyone knows China has far reaching intentions of displacing the United States as the lone Superpower and i am sure russia would love to climb back to the top of the heap as well. Mr. brown mkes his characters come alive as you read through their constant high drama events.

I came to loath the United States president James Gardener as he seemed to be too consumed with getting re-elected to run the country or to show that the united States miliatry was in fact the predominant force in the world. I will definitely read the other books in this series as i wait for the follow up to Executive intent.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on May 12, 2011
Maybe I should have known better. I saw the 3.5/5 rating on this but was desperate for a new book so bought this. The book opens up fantastically, really excellent. However, we then see a pattern of stepping up of deployed technologies by nations over many, many chapters. I suppose it was around 45% of the way through that I realized there was virtually no plot growth at all. Every chapter blurred into the next; China looking into a new technology, ditto for the US. Back and forth back and forth. Some of the chapters could have virtually been randomly reordered and you'd not even be able to tell. The second this dawned on me, that things were not actually going anywhere, I was forced to put it down and no longer can pick the book up. I've enjoyed Tom Clancy books 2-3 times as long as this. They are slow to grow but the growth is there. This, it just really felt like wheel spinning and after a hundred pages of that I'd had enough.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on June 18, 2011
I have read and listened to a number of Dale Brown books. This one was marked with 13 pages of character names (a nice feature), weapons names, and acronyms along with another 13 pages of "current" real world headlines and news stories. 26 pages before you begin reading was far too many; any new reader would probably be scared away just by the number of acronyms and weapons. And the ending of this book came so fast and tied up so many ends (without adequate explanations and detail) that it seemed like the author had a submission date due with the publisher and had to finish the book today--forget the details. As I approached the end of this interesting book, I was sure that there was going to be a "to be continued" ending. It would have been better than the shorthanded way of tying things up. Reading the reviews now tells me I should be careful in choosing future Brown novels.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on April 7, 2011
First off I will say that I am a big fan of Dale Brown. I have read every one of his books and was disapointed in the ending of this one. In true fashion he builds the story to a crescendo, but then fails to deliver. I agree with the reviewer that there needs to be three more chapters at the end. He simply ends the story in a cheap way leaving the reader hanging. I would like to see him update this book with the missing chapters. It is like he waves a magic wand at the end and boom, story over. I guess he already reached his page commitment to the publisher. Come on Dale, you owe your loyal readers better than this.

That said, he does a great job as always introducing new technical gizmo's that are in the near future. We should put Dale in charge of DARPA!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.