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Exiles: Living Missionally in a Post-Christian Culture Paperback – July 25, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 333 pages
  • Publisher: Hendrickson Publishers (July 25, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565636708
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565636705
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,006,376 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

This book is for exiles: Christians who find themselves caught in that dangerous wilderness between contemporary secular Western culture and an old-fashioned church culture of respectability and conservatism. Frost presents a plea for such Christians to embrace a dynamic, life-affirming, robust Christian faith that can be lived confidently in a world that no longer values such a faith. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Michael Frost is the Director of the Centre for Evangelism and Global Mission at Morling Baptist Seminary in Sydney, Australia, and is the author of numerous books including Seeing God in the Ordinary (Hendrickson, 2000) and The Shaping of Things to Come with Alan Hirsch (Hendrickson, 2003), both best sellers. He travels and speaks on the emergent church in the U.S., Canada, and the UK, as well as Australia and New Zealand.

More About the Author

Michael Frost (1961 - ) is an internationally recognised missiologist and one of the leading voices in the missional church movement. His books are required reading in colleges and seminaries around the world and he is much sought after as an international conference speaker. Frost is the Vice Principal of Morling College and the founding Director of the Tinsley Institute, a mission study centre located at Morling College in Sydney, Australia.

He is the author or editor of fourteen popular Christian books, the most recent of which are the highly successful and award-winning The Shaping of Things to Come (2003, co-authored with colleague Alan Hirsch), Exiles (2006) and The Road to Missional (2011). These books explore a missiological framework for the church in the postmodern era. Frost's books have been translated into German, Korean and Spanish.

Customer Reviews

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This is one of the best books on the church I have ever read.
Joshua D. Brown
I can say and mean with confidence that it will either be your kind of book or it won't - there won't be many people in between!
Andrew F. Menzies
Michael Frost reaches into the soul of the Christian life and shines the light that I believe Jesus wants us to acknowledge!
Joyously Living

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Johan Maurer on November 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
I understand why some reviewers prefer the first half of the book to the second. And I too wonder whether Michael Frost gets a little too prescriptive in some of his second-half pronouncements.

Here's why I forgive and welcome those pronouncements:

First of all, he's made it clear enough in the earlier pages that we're not to use his opinions and guidelines as a substitute for the work of making our own.

Second, the issues he lists are not "liberal talking points," but concrete examples of applied discipleship. We may very well come to different conclusions, but at least we are watching someone try to say what being an exile means with very concrete examples. We wouldn't disagree (or agree, as I often do) if we didn't have some raw material to work with. For example, I think that his critique of the corporation is valid and worth considering by Christians who are active in the business world. Such Christians might be able to offer a good corrective to Frost's critique, but where else would they have even read such a critique (aka an invitation to dialogue) from an evangelical source?

I think his comments on the exaggerated importance of the weekly gathering, and on the vapidity (to put it charitably) of much praise music goes a little over the top. But I'm a grown-up; I can handle a passionate commentary, agree with some of it and disagree with the rest.

To those who haven't read the book yet: I highly recommend it, in part as a good extended sermon, and in part as a catalog of neglected dimensions of discipleship, some elements of which will resonate with you more than others. (The chapter on environmental stewardship is a more comprehensive summary of the issues involved than I've seen in other evangelical sources.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By J. Waldron on August 15, 2007
Format: Paperback
I read this book after being involved in an emerging church full of exiles. There's so much I recognise and agree with in this book, which I think accurately portrays the feelings, reasoning, and practical implications of those who are rejecting the current church.

My one criticism of this book is that it seemed to be so angry - not just passionate - and very hard-line. The arguments and experiences need to be heard, but you can't continue to build a church on your anger toward what you define yourself against. I think Mike's disdain for pastoral care of the hurting also assumes that exiles are happy to go from a painful, abusive church to throwing themselves into mission in a victorious, confident experiment, where my experience is that a lot of us want a rest and need to deal with our issues before we inflict our woundedness all over others. I'm not saying we should be the perfect, healed, whole Christian...I'm just aware of how bitter and angry an exile can become.
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Andrew F. Menzies on January 30, 2007
Format: Paperback
Michael Frost is a naturally gifted communicator. He is also the Vice Principal at the Baptist College of NSW (Morling College) and there he heads up the Centre for Global Mission and Evangelism. He has written several books before although has come into international prominence through the book he co-authored with Alan Hirsch, The Shaping of Things to Come.

If you are a thoroughly Christianized church going person (who for example enjoys visits to local Christian bookstores), then maybe this book is not for you. (You probably should read it but I don't want to be the one who made you mad or upset or confused) This is a strong book! But it is a truthful book and a necessary book. I can say and mean with confidence that it will either be your kind of book or it won't - there won't be many people in between!

Frost has written it particularly for those who are trying to follow Jesus but find themselves on the margins of the church or for those who simply tried church and eventually gave up - therefore it is written for many, many people! The book is broken into four sections (Dangerous Memories, Dangerous Promises, Dangerous Criticism, & Dangerous Songs).

The first half of the book is particularly brutal on the traditional, solid church at times but then again it isn't written for that wing of God's people. At times I struggled with his inability to find anything good with the form of church I have been in for most of the past 20 or so years (and I could name worthy things that the church has contributed in areas of justice, local charities, community, youth housing, youth work, family counseling, education, theological education, etc) but this is a prophetic book and the argument and experience of many needs to be heard.
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54 of 74 people found the following review helpful By B. Auvermann on October 13, 2006
Format: Paperback
There can be no question that Michael Frost is a thoughtful guy, a critic with a deep and thoroughgoing desire to live victoriously after the manner of Christ. The first half of the book is a withering but good-natured critique of Christendom, especially its American, evangelical manifestations, which have departed in so many subtle ways from the liminal, exilic calling that Jesus modeled for us. Frost's extended meditation on what God's incarnation in Jesus implies for our mission on earth is passionate, moving, profound and relatively free of facile pap. His argument that the church must aggressively rid itself of unholy alliances with earthly kingdoms -- in the first half of the book, that means governments and quasi-governmental institutions -- is compelling. It is reminiscent of Roxburgh's little jewel on liminality and the church, and it is unfailingly practical.

Unfortunately, Frost apparently finds it impossible to believe that the kinds of exilic values he holds, and that he urges on the rest of us, are compatible with political conservatism, despite mountains of evidence to the contrary that he does not bother to consider or cite. The second half of the book is little more than Frost's grandstanding and rapid-fire recitation of liberal talking points. His finely tuned sensitivity to nuance and paradox in the first half of the book gives way to an incoherent strafing run fueled by contempt for George W. Bush, corporations (Frost inexplicably neglects to observe that corporations are themselves people and could not exist without the personal investments of people -- and especially the publicly held ones that are responsible for a tremendous amount of the wealth that makes global-scale benevolence possible) and the diverse, multifaceted motivations for the current Iraq war.
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