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Exodus: How Migration is Changing Our World Hardcover – October 1, 2013


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (October 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195398653
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195398656
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 1.4 x 6.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #190,670 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"Paul Collier is one of the world's most thoughtful economists. His books consistently illuminate and provoke. Exodus is no exception." --The Economist


"Magisterial. Paul Collier offers a comprehensive, incisive, and well-written balance sheet of the pros and cons of immigration for receiving societies, sending societies, and migrants themselves. For everyone on every side of this contentious issue, Exodus is a must-read." --Robert Putnam, Malkin Professor of Public Policy, Harvard University, and author of Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community


"Paul Collier has done it again. Exodus is his latest effort to subject taboo topics to straightforward questions that most other scholars shrink from asking. This time Collier considers the effects of migration on the departing peoples' new homes, their old homes, and the emigrants themselves. Collier's framework for thinking about the topic is valuable; his explanation of past research is insightful; and his agenda for further studies displays his aptitude for considering big topics while pressing for detailed research. Moreover, he courageously interconnects different fields of scholarship-addressing problems that don't fit neatly into academic categories. This book is a true achievement." --Robert B. Zoellick, Former President of the World Bank Group, U.S. Trade Representative, and U.S. Deputy Secretary of State


"At a time when debate over immigration policy is polarizing public opinion, there could be no better guide to the issues involved than Paul Collier. He is lucid, undogmatic, convinced of the potential benefits of immigration but aware that these benefits can be put at risk if the process is managed indiscriminately or thoughtlessly. This important book will not end the debate but will help steer it." --Paul Seabright, Toulouse School of Economics and Director of the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse


"An economist and expert on the world's poorest populations analyzes who migrates, why and the effects on host societies...Valuable reading for policymakers." --Kirkus


About the Author


Paul Collier, CBE is a Professor of Economics, Director for the Centre for the Study of African Economies at the University of Oxford and Fellow of St Antony's College. He is the author of The Plundered Planet; Wars, Guns, and Votes; and The Bottom Billion, winner of Estoril Distinguished Book Prize, the Arthur Ross Book Award, and the Lionel Gelber Prize.

More About the Author

Paul Collier is Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for the Study of African Economies at Oxford University and a former director of Development Research at the World Bank. In addition to the award-winning The Bottom Billion, he is the author of Wars, Guns, and Votes: Democracy in Dangerous Places.

Customer Reviews

The book is well researched and well written.
Henry Arthur Hubert
While Collier is an economist by trade, he goes well beyond economic analysis in his consideration of migration.
Jesse D. Walker
Block 2 Diasporas accelerate migration. ... These links cut the costs of migration and so fuel it.
MRHULOT

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Gaetan Lion on August 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is an extremely insightful book on the subject. Paul Collier conveys this is a complex subject ill fitted to the simple binomial outcomes (yes it is good; no it is bad) adopted by the media, politicians, business lobbyists, and even economists. The issue is not whether migration is good or bad but what is the optimal rate of migration for a specific country. He makes a case that there is an optimal migration level or rate. And, if we leave migration to itself, it will exceed the optimal level and eventually hurt.

The social effects of migration follow an inverse-U shape, with gains from moderate migration and losses from high migration. Moderate migration is liable to confer overall social benefits, whereas sustained rapid migration would risk substantial costs. Also, a low-density country such as Canada and Australia can accommodate a far greater rate of migration than high-density countries such as Western European ones.

Moderate migration has modestly positive economic effects on the indigenous population in the medium term. Any long-term effects are negligible. In contrast, sustained rapid migration lowers the living standard of the indigenous population, both through wage effect and due to the need to share scarce public capital.

Collier builds an elegant model that explains the rate of migration from one country to another. The rate of migration is determined by: 1) the width of the income gap (the wider it is the faster the migration rate from the low-income to high-income country); 2) the level of income in country of origin (the lower the income the higher the emigration rate); and 3) the size of the diaspora in the host country (the larger the diaspora the higher the immigration rate into the host country).
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Roger D. Launius VINE VOICE on September 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
FDR once famously said that the Daughters of the American Revolution: "Remember, remember always that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists." It was the tritest of all comments, reminding everyone that Americans of every background are all descended from immigrants. This book takes as its focus FDR's dictum and explores episodes in the immigrant experience in both the United States and beyond. It offers case studies on the specific interactions of those from other places on the globe with those already in America.

The author, famous for his book "The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It" (2007), a professor of economics at Oxford University and he seeks here to first describe what drives migration--his answer is economics, surprise--and the desire to better oneself. He focuses on migration patterns from both the perspective of the individuals migrating and from the nations and cultures that they migrate to. His emphasis on the social, economic, and political costs for both the country of origin and the receiving country is certainly useful.

Four major parts--the questions and the process, host societies and their response to migration, the migrants themselves, and the fate of those left behind--lead naturally into a final section that deals with policy considerations and what might societies do in the future to deal with this issue. Collier's conclusions suggest that the issues are much more complex than those who support or those that oppose immigration.

Interesting, Collier does not talk at length about an historical and policy question that most interests me, the challenge of highly-skilled immigrants, especially those with scientific and technological capabilities.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Despite a mostly UK-centric narrative, this dense (but succinct) treatment of migration - mostly framed in the context of migration's impact on the host, migrant and the society of origin - provides an excellent review and critique of socio-economic theories/philosophies that have shaped views on immigration. Collier methodically explains the key factors that are likely to influence the migration rate and then starts delineating the impact on
all parties concerned. The discussion around the impact of the size of diaspora, assimilative tendencies and income gap differentials are interesting and provide a reasonable framework to think about motives than rely on politician/media-created generalisms that tend to appeal to emotions than reason. Throughout the book, Collier manages to provide a mostly impartial and consistent view of migration and its effect before making a strong ethical case for why a society can (and should) control migration.

Collier's examples typically refer to the low-skill migration and his views on high-skill migration is nuanced and guided more by ethical arguments than utilitarian arguments (the very same ones he seemed to use to rationalize low-skill migration). Readers of a particular political persuasion can of course find cherrypick some observations to justify their view, but the relatively reduced focus on high-skill migration is an opportunity lost to add more clarity to the discussion. While much has been written on IT sector in the US, the medical skill migration to UK (and US) poses ethical and economic arguments far more pronounced than any other high-skill sector. Collier could have devoted more space to address high-skill migration.
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