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Exploits of Sherlock Holmes Hardcover – May 11, 1999


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Gramercy (May 11, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0517203383
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517203385
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,078,657 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

From the son of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and one of America's greatest mystery writers, John Dickson Carr, comes twelve riveting tales based on incidents or elements of the unsolved cases of Sherlock Holmes. The plots are all new, with painstaking attention to the mood, tone, and detail of the original stories. Here is a fascinating volume of mysteries for new Sherlock fans, as well as for those who have read all the classics and crave more!

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Maybe another reader will make a comment and explain why I am or am not wrong.
hem43
The stories in the Exploits of Sherlock Holmes carries on the great tradition of Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Conan Doyle.
Cwoodpusher
Some of them are not as good, but in general it captures the essence of the characters and the environment.
Antonio Martin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Patrick J. Callahan on September 5, 1999
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I purchased this book in part on the strength of three 5-star reviews on this site. This is a very handsome hardcover volume at a surprisingly reasonable price.
There are three classifications of stories in the book. First, stories primarily written by Adrian Conan Doyle, with some input from JD Carr. Second, two stories written almost entirely by Mr. Carr, possibly with some slight input from Doyle. Third, six stories written solely by Mr. Adrian Doyle.
Since I have read a number of mysteries by Carr, and expected much, I was most disappointed to find his two stories the weakest in the book. In one instance, after reading the first page I was able to anticipate the entire plot. In the other case, I simply found the story flat, uninteresting, and narrowly derivative of similar stories in the original Holmes canon.
To the contrary, some of the stories by Mr. Doyle cannot be praised enough. One that's typical, "The Adventure of Foulkes Rath," seems up to the work of Arthur Conan Doyle himself. All in all, Adrian Doyle admirably captures the style and brooding Gothic tone that so typifies many of the best stories in the original Holmes canon. Moreover, Adrian Doyle's stories have a kind of life and warmth that brings the Edwardian world alive for the reader.
I would give the book five stars were it not for a few tales that seem off the pace, and decidedly inferior to the others. Alas-- and surprisingly-- these are from JD Carr's pen. Perhaps Carr tried too diligently to write an impeccably logical mystery, where nothing in the denoument was not well provided for in the early story.
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32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By John S. Ryan on August 3, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Patrick Callahan's excellent review is right on the money, but I'm giving this little book four stars anyway just because, when it's good, it's _very_ good. Some of the stories contained herein -- based on Watson's occasional references to unrecorded (not "unsolved", as the current edition's subtitle incorrectly has it) cases -- surpass some of the elder Doyle's later works. Highly recommended, especially as an antidote to the surfeit of "pastiches" that can't seem to get any of the details right.

Adrian Conan Doyle (with or without John Dickson Carr) tells a straight no-frills tale very much in the spirit of the Sherlockian canon; Holmes doesn't wind up getting married, Watson doesn't turn out to be the real Holmes, et cetera, et cetera. And there are no attempts to link Holmes to fabulous ripped-from-the-headlines figures like Dracula or Jack the Ripper -- these are perfectly ordinary cases of the kind in which Holmes himself was known to delight for their own sake owing to their touch of the _outre_ and the singular features they presented to the reasoner. Solid stuff despite the weaknesses of a few of the tales.

If you want a couple of novel-length pastiches to go with it, I recommend Nicholas Meyer's first two: _The Seven Per Cent Solution_ and _The West End Horror_.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Antonio Martin on April 2, 2001
Format: Hardcover
These are the best and more Sherlock-like stories since the ones written by ACD. Some of them are not as good, but in general it captures the essence of the characters and the environment. I read everything related to Sherlock, but this is so far, the most entertaining and interesting collection of cases post-ACD. The characters are very close to the original, and that is something to appreciate. None of the authors try to do anything to prove themselves better than the master. I agree with other reviewers. It is a very enjoyable book.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 15, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This collection of stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyles youngest son, Adrian Conan Doyle, in collaboration with American mystery writer John Dickson Carr, are a wonderful treat for anyone who loves the originals! The twelve stories here refer to cases that Doyle made teasing reference to in the original series but never made available to the reading public. The stories are filled with black hearted villians, damsels in distress, atmosphere, and above all, the friendship between Holmes and Watson that have made them the most famous characters in the history of literature. Several stories like "The Adventure of the Deptford Horror" and "The Adventure of the Red Widow" are dark tales of murder; while others such as "The Aventure of the Wax Gamblers" and "The Aventure of the Highgate Miracle" will make you smile. What I enjoyed the most is that the authors have tried to stay true to the characters and didn't try to change them as other writers have done. The stories seem to have been written with one goal in mind, to fill the reader with delight! Originaly written in the early 1950s and out of print for many years, I am happy that Random House has released this once again, and in a Hardbound edition. Come dear reader,"the games afoot!"
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 23, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Also one of the strangest. It's widely uneven, since two people write different sections of it, but still an interesting read. Now, this book sounds nearly exactly like Doyle's original stories. Why? It's not just the dated language, it's the simple mechanism most Holmes fans don't use: Making mistakes. Giving Holmes a red dressing gown instead of purple or grey. Giving an irregular the name "Billy", the name of his page-boy. Small details like that. However, for some reason, I thought that, as the book neared it's close, it sounded more and more like a pastiche. The most superior stories are "The Gold Hunter" and "The Sealed Room". The former, based on "the Camberwell poisoning case", involves the death of an elderly man in his bed, with literally no indication of how he died. The latter is based on "Colonel Warburton's Madness", and involves whether or not a retired military man shot himself and his wife in a locked room, or if he was murdered. "Foukles Rath" is a story where the killer is introduced at the very end, leaving the reader with no way to solve it. "The Abbas Ruby" has few suspects and is very easy to guess whodunit, and "The Dark Angels" seems like you haven't been given enough evidence to confront the murderer. "The Black Baronet" was also good, good enough to be adapted as a Tv play starring Basil Rathbone. But "The Red Window" totally ripped off "The Norwood Builder", covered up with the line "I may use this modest trick again" or words to that effect. Also, it has Holmes saying "Elementary, my Dear Watson," which he never said. All in all, OK reading.
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