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Exploring the Moon: The Apollo Expeditions (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration) Paperback – January, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0387746388 ISBN-10: 0387746382 Edition: 2nd

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Exploring the Moon: The Apollo Expeditions (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration) + The First Men on the Moon: The Story of Apollo 11 (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Springer-Praxis; 2nd edition (January 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0387746382
  • ISBN-13: 978-0387746388
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 1.1 x 10.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #559,978 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

From the reviews of the first edition -

"A detailed guide to what the astronauts did during their stays on the lunar surface. Walk(s) the reader through the prospecting excursions and then incorporate(s) decades of subsequent analysis to put the explorations of dust, rocks, craters, and rilles into geologic context." SKY & TELESCOPE

"EXPLORING THE MOON is very well illustrated…All aficionados of the Apollo program will find much to appreciate in [this book].

"…this is an interesting account of one of the most extraordinary decades in history…a very different book. David Harland probably knows more about the nuts and bolts of the Russian and American space programs than any other author and it shows.”LUNAR & PLANETARY INFORMATION BULLETIN

From the reviews of the second edition:

"David Harland’s book is an honourable addition to the ranks. Exploring the Moon – The Apollo Expeditions is packed with photos, and features a historically detailed text backed by a thorough index. … If you want to know the exact order in which NASA’s Apollo astronauts surveyed particular zones of their landing sites, or which craters delivered the most interesting scientific clues about the origins of the Moon, then this is the book for you. … a fantastic resource for fans of the Apollo era." (Piers Bizony, BBC Sky at Night, July, 2008)

"A wealth of knowledge regarding the early days of manned space exploration. … Its high resolution photography brings a surface that few have seen before into crystal clarity." (James M. Busby, Space Times, Vol. 47 (3), 2008)

From the Back Cover

David Harland opens with a review of the robotic probes, namely the Rangers which returned television before crashing into the Moon, the Surveyors which 'soft landed' in order to investigate the nature of the surface, and the Lunar Orbiters which mapped prospective Apollo landing sites. He then outlines the historic landing by Apollo 11 in terms of what was discovered, and how over the next several missions the program was progressively geared up to enable the final three missions each to spend three days on comprehensive geological investigations. He concludes with a review of the robotic spacecraft that made remote-sensing observations of the Moon. Although aimed at the enthusiast, and can be read as an adventure in exploration, the book develops the scientific theme of lunar geology, and therefore will be of use as background reading for undergraduate students of planetary sciences. In addition, with the prospect of a resumption of human missions, it will help journalists understand what Apollo achieved after the 'flags and footprints' of the Apollo 11 landing in July1969 and will commemorate the fortieth anniversary of that momentous event.

Highlighted as a "Commemorative Edition" on the cover, this second edition has a new foreword by one of the original astronauts and a short extra section at the end previewing the prospect of a renewal of human exploration of the Moon. It will include new extra high quality graphics which are only now available and 32 pages of colour illustrations.

 

From the reviews of the first edition -

"A detailed guide to what the astronauts did during their stays on the lunar surface. Walk(s) the reader through the prospecting excursions and then incorporate(s) decades of subsequent analysis to put the explorations of dust, rocks, craters, and rilles into geologic context." SKY & TELESCOPE

"EXPLORING THE MOON is very well illustrated…All aficionados of the Apollo program will find much to appreciate in [this book].

"…this is an interesting account of one of the most extraordinary decades in history…a very different book. David Harland probably knows more about the nuts and bolts of the Russian and American space programs than any other author and it shows.”LUNAR & PLANETARY INFORMATION BULLETIN


More About the Author

David M. Harland lives in Glasgow in Scotland. He holds a bachelor's degree in astronomy and a doctorate in computer science, both from St Andrews, the oldest university in Scotland, which is located on the end of a peninsula and thinks it lies at the centre of the universe. After working in academia and the computer industry, he "retired" in 1995 to write full time on his childhood interest in space exploration. He has published several dozen books, mostly with Springer-Praxis. He has also edited books by other authors. On a personal level, he has a fondness for cats, so long as they don't scratch.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Geology is the biggest scientific theme, and the amount of detail is fantastic.
Sandstone
David Harland's book is one of the finest I have ever seen on the Apollo program or on Solar System exploration in general.
givbatam3
One hopes that a large format hardcover edition of this will be released, showing the photos in their full glory.
Rogera Sauterer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
`Exploring The Moon - The Apollo Expeditions' is an account of the manned Apollo lunar landing missions and their unmanned precursors and successors. It focuses on the three so-called 'J-missions', the extended 3-day stays on the lunar surface which brought the program to a conclusion, and delivered the bulk of its scientific results.
Having previously read the detailed accounts of lunar surface activities contained in the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal -- a web resource that documents the mission transcripts with a commentary -- it was a delight to read Harland's travelogue-style approach. The extremely lucid narrative really succeeds at putting the astronauts activities into context, with lunar geology being the scientific theme. One feels at times as though one is standing just a few feet away from the moonwalkers as they cope with the pressures of trying to perform work in the limited time available, the frustrations of apparatus not working as planned, and the exhilaration of surprise discoveries.
Supplementing the text are numerous maps, photos and some excellent assembled panoramas mosaicked specifically for this book. Appendices list the missions, the crews, and the moonrock samples described in the text. A glossary of geological terms and a description of all of the lunar surface experiments will be helpful to the non-geologist, non-scientist reader alike.
One will not likely find a better book on the subject of planetary field geology. Perhaps this ought to be required reading for the people who will someday return to the Moon.
Astronomer Patrick Moore provides the Foreword, and Apollo 15 Commander David Scott the Afterword to this exceptional work. Even the learned Dr.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Tyler Peterson on June 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
Having written on the space shuttle and the Russian space station Mir, David Harland now ventures further back into the history of space exploration with this book. Exploring the Moon is a welcome addition to the plethora of books regarding the Apollo Program, providing an on-the-surface narrative and and scientific analysis of the missions reminiscient of the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal. After a section on the unmanned probes in the 1960's (Ranger, Lunar Orbiter, and Surveyor), he moves on to the Apollo flights, outlining the moonwalks on Apollo 11, 12, and 14, and then spends the bulk of the book outlining the Apollo "J" missions-Apollo 15, 16, and 17, which featured advanced life support systems in the lunar module and the astronauts' backpacks, an extended three days on the lunar surface, and a four-wheeled battery-powered buggy known as the Lunar Roving Vehicle. While most books focus on the technology that got America to the moon, few jave focused on the subsequent excursions of the spacesuit-clad astronauts on the lunar surface. This book does so magnificently, combining technical commentary with the words the astronauts spoke and the photographs they took. With the bonanza of lunar information provided by the last three Apollo missions, you will wonder why we felt inclined to cancel the Apollo missions 18, 19, and 20. Overall, I think this book covers lunar science and geology superbly, is a great adventure story, and a unique contribution to the studies of lunar science and planetary geology.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Rogera Sauterer on June 4, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Exploring the Moon" is a detailed review of the moon walks, especially (nearly 3/4 of the book) of the "J" missions of Apollo 15, 16, and 17. The book has detailed descriptions of the roving on the moon, the work done there and a fair amount about the geological discoveries. For those who spent hours glued to the TV watching these treks of discovery, this book takes you back and gives you new insights. The book also has hundreds of photos from the moon walks, although they are reproduced as tiny images. About the only criticism that I have is that the images are way too small and the book is available only in paperback. One hopes that a large format hardcover edition of this will be released, showing the photos in their full glory. For anybody interested in the actual moonwalks, this is the book to buy!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By m hanlon on September 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
At last,a book about the Apollo missions that does not dwell on Buzz's drinking, one-small-steps or the "unfolding human near-tragedy" that was Apollo 13. These are all great topics but they have been done to death. What Harland has done is chronicle the real reason - well, it later became the real reason - that Nasa went to the Moon. Once the euphoria ofbeating the Russians had worn off, six missions were sent to explore the surface of another planet. One failed, but the 10 men who followed in Aldrin's and Armstrong's footsteps managed to revolutionise our knowledge about the big white disc in the sky. Most of what they did was geology - so there are plenty of rocks here. If you don't know your pyroxenes from your olivines you might struggle a bit, but there is a helpful glossary. You are struck by just how damn hard these men worked in the precious hours and days they had on the lunar surface. there is human drama in this book, but it is in the imagined sweat and tears that must have been exuded to get these results. Finally, you are left reeling by the tragedy of "what might have been". Apollos 18-thru-20 were cancelled, and the Saturn 5s that were to carry further lunar missions now sit rusting in a Nasa carpark. As Harland points out, "they got bored with exploring another planet".
If you are interested in the Moon, or simply in why humanity goes into space, read this book.
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