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Exploring the Night Sky with Binoculars Paperback – October 16, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0521793902 ISBN-10: 0521793904 Edition: 4th

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"...a useful beginner's guide to the binocular sky." Sky & Telescope

"...a very practical guide, explaining clearly what may be observed with binoculars in the sky at night." Physics Bulletin

Book Description

On a starry night, the beauty and immensity of our universe is awe-inspiring. Patrick Moore has painstakingly researched Exploring the Night Sky with Binoculars to describe this rewarding hobby. He explains the basics of astronomy, the selection of binoculars, and the stars, nebulas and galaxies awaiting the observer. Detailed seasonal constellation maps from both hemispheres, with material on the Sun, Moon, planets, comets and meteors are included. Beautifully illustrated, this handbook will help and encourage casual and serious observers alike.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 212 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 4 edition (October 16, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521793904
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521793902
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,744,082 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dave Holland on June 10, 2006
Format: Paperback
If you are looking for a beginner book with a goal of recognizing the constellations, there are better choices (consider "The Stars, a new way to see them" by HA Ray). Moore's comprehensive description of each star in a constellation tends to drag, and details go well beyond the beginner level. A lot of the data will repeat what should be contained in a good star atlas. On the other hand I liked his viewing perspective, mostly aimed from northern latitudes ca 50 deg. I liked his easy literary style, and he does have an enviable lifetime of experience. He uses D-shaped star maps, that work well for stars near the horizon, but these maps aren't so good for stars overhead. Some of the introductory chapters are simple overviews of astronomy facts that are better covered in my university textbooks. Ultimately the superficial details aren't useful once you are beyond that beginner stage. I could still see holding onto a copy of this, or it's cousin "Stargazing", if only as a supplementary reference to a star atlas. However, for it's stated description as a beginner's guide to the sky, it falls short.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dutchman on August 31, 2008
Format: Paperback
The author's advice on choice of binocular ignores the age-related change in size of the human pupil, so that a 7x50 binocular is probably more binocular than an over-fifty star-gazer can use. This issue is covered well in "Astronomy Hacks" by Robert Thompson.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jim Schmidt on March 14, 2013
Format: Paperback
Didn;t care for this book much...the author is a respected British astronomer, but the book was pedantic, and by "grouchy" I mean that he just really didn;t seem to be "into it"...he's obviously partial to telescopes, which is fine, but he certainly didn;t impart very much encouragement or enthusiasm into the aspects of binocular astronomy as other books do. The book, in the main, is a constellation-by-consteallation guide to the sky, with no "simulated" binocular views/closeups, which make other books on binocular astronomy so helpful. If there's any saving grace, it's that he's pretty clear what he - even as an experienced astronomer - is *not* able to see with binoculars (or what isn;t worth seeing) which actually helped sooth some disapointments I've had in my own stargazing. Not recommended.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. Tripathi on January 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
Its one of the well written books I've come across about scanning the night skies through binoculars. If you simply want to point your binoculars anywhere in the sky after consulting a map, this book will not likely appeal too much.

The first chapter takes us through the big dipper and sets a good foundation for understanding the movement of stars during night and during the year (every star sets 4 minutes earlier than the previous night; orientation of big dipper around the year; how to measure angular distances using anchor points; characteristics of stars and Hertzsprung-Russell sequence etc.) All in the first chapter, and really a good amount of information presented briefly to give any intelligent reader the tools necessary for finding his/her way across the sky.
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