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7 Reviews
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars condensed material - not a book for dabblers
Its one of the well written books I've come across about scanning the night skies through binoculars. If you simply want to point your binoculars anywhere in the sky after consulting a map, this book will not likely appeal too much.

The first chapter takes us through the big dipper and sets a good foundation for understanding the movement of stars during night...
Published on January 21, 2009 by R. Tripathi

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unnecessary detail
If you are looking for a beginner book with a goal of recognizing the constellations, there are better choices (consider "The Stars, a new way to see them" by HA Ray). Moore's comprehensive description of each star in a constellation tends to drag, and details go well beyond the beginner level. A lot of the data will repeat what should be contained in a good star atlas...
Published on June 10, 2006 by Dave Holland


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unnecessary detail, June 10, 2006
If you are looking for a beginner book with a goal of recognizing the constellations, there are better choices (consider "The Stars, a new way to see them" by HA Ray). Moore's comprehensive description of each star in a constellation tends to drag, and details go well beyond the beginner level. A lot of the data will repeat what should be contained in a good star atlas. On the other hand I liked his viewing perspective, mostly aimed from northern latitudes ca 50 deg. I liked his easy literary style, and he does have an enviable lifetime of experience. He uses D-shaped star maps, that work well for stars near the horizon, but these maps aren't so good for stars overhead. Some of the introductory chapters are simple overviews of astronomy facts that are better covered in my university textbooks. Ultimately the superficial details aren't useful once you are beyond that beginner stage. I could still see holding onto a copy of this, or it's cousin "Stargazing", if only as a supplementary reference to a star atlas. However, for it's stated description as a beginner's guide to the sky, it falls short.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ignore Binocular Advice, August 31, 2008
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The author's advice on choice of binocular ignores the age-related change in size of the human pupil, so that a 7x50 binocular is probably more binocular than an over-fifty star-gazer can use. This issue is covered well in "Astronomy Hacks" by Robert Thompson.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Grouchy...Not Recommended, March 14, 2013
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Didn;t care for this book much...the author is a respected British astronomer, but the book was pedantic, and by "grouchy" I mean that he just really didn;t seem to be "into it"...he's obviously partial to telescopes, which is fine, but he certainly didn;t impart very much encouragement or enthusiasm into the aspects of binocular astronomy as other books do. The book, in the main, is a constellation-by-consteallation guide to the sky, with no "simulated" binocular views/closeups, which make other books on binocular astronomy so helpful. If there's any saving grace, it's that he's pretty clear what he - even as an experienced astronomer - is *not* able to see with binoculars (or what isn;t worth seeing) which actually helped sooth some disapointments I've had in my own stargazing. Not recommended.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars condensed material - not a book for dabblers, January 21, 2009
Its one of the well written books I've come across about scanning the night skies through binoculars. If you simply want to point your binoculars anywhere in the sky after consulting a map, this book will not likely appeal too much.

The first chapter takes us through the big dipper and sets a good foundation for understanding the movement of stars during night and during the year (every star sets 4 minutes earlier than the previous night; orientation of big dipper around the year; how to measure angular distances using anchor points; characteristics of stars and Hertzsprung-Russell sequence etc.) All in the first chapter, and really a good amount of information presented briefly to give any intelligent reader the tools necessary for finding his/her way across the sky.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Quick and good quality, January 6, 2014
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I recieved this book very quickly and it's in very good shape. Some pages have signs of oridynary use but it doesn't bothers me at all like as I said - it's completely ok :)
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5.0 out of 5 stars A useful guide, July 16, 2012
A friend gave me this guide years ago. I think she thought my interest in observing birds would bleed into stargazing. It took me a while, but I came across the book one day and I realized I had a set of binocs that not quite right for birding, and hadn't I always wanted to get beyond the Big Dipper/Polaris as the one thing I could always identify? Now, I'm a fan. Last night I "swept" the area around Altair and saw an attractive constellation-like cluster of stars - turns out it was Delphinus, which I hadn't even heard of before last night.

Moore does not aim for the most simplistic presentation, but I find that rewarding. Here is Cygnus, he says, but if you look for *Greek letter star whatever* you'll see this nebula. He has a Carl Sagan-ish gift for drawing you closer in, so that you get excited about it. In a world that seems to have a distressing number of science illiterates, and a vast number of people who have a glib, superficial understanding at best of headline-making scientific discoveries, it's refreshing to read an eloquent case for going outside (better to start on a warm summer night) and doing a little science on your own. As Moore points out, astronomy is one branch of science where important work is done by amateurs.
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15 of 31 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Average Book. Some good details, at times tedious., October 21, 1998
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johnss@brightpoint.com (Indianapolis, Indiana) - See all my reviews
A lot of the information is given in metric system. Pricing information is given in the British Pound. Much of the information given is very good and the advise he gives is sound in regards to binocular size. There are many instances when the subject mater drags and I found myself drifting off or jumping ahead.
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Exploring the Night Sky with Binoculars
Exploring the Night Sky with Binoculars by Patrick Moore (Hardcover - February 23, 1996)
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