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Explosive Running: Using the Science of Kinesiology to Improve Your Performance Paperback – May 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.; 1st edition (May 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0809298996
  • ISBN-13: 978-0809298990
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 0.4 x 10.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #69,219 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Michael Yessis, Ph.D., is president of Sports Training Inc., a facility that helps professional athletes train. He is also an author and has appeared on "Today" and "CNN News".


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Customer Reviews

The book has a great deal of information pertaining to running stride.
Clinton S. Wasylishen
I would reccommend this book to anyone who is serious about running and looking to add more specifity to their running program.
Matthew Neff
This book is loaded with information about proper form, stretching, and strength training for RUNNERS.
Jeffrey E Bennett

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Clinton S. Wasylishen on April 7, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have read this book... and am preparing to read it again.
I have read a lot on running, and have even taken a few courses, and then I read this book - what an eye opener! I quickly realized how biased some people that teach running courses are, and how little actual knowledge is out there on many of the topics that are introduced in this book. A couple of examples:
The section on barefoot running. This is the part of the book that the big shoe companies don't want you reading. I think that it's largely true, though most would have trouble believing, it - I think that the author has done an exceptional job of backing up his theories on this one. As soon as the snow melts, I will be unlacing my shoes for the first time ever ;-)
The book has a great deal of information pertaining to running stride. A lot of what I have learned revolves around the theory that you were born with a certain stride, and you should just "run like you run" - don't worry about your stride. Obviously (if you have an open mind) you can see through that garbage, and get "real" with your running. Tons of pictures to back this up (someone could argue that the quality of the photos used in the book are poor, but I think that they are sufficient, given that they are for illustration purposes - not wall hangings).
Stretching. Believe that most everyone who is stretching today isn't doing it properly, or could certainly be doing it better. The author gets into active stretching, versus passive stretching. Very mind altering stuff... with a lot of facts to back up why this is the way to do it. I have not incorporated these stretches into my training yet, but will be doing shortly (takes a bit of work to alter what I have learned over the years).
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37 of 40 people found the following review helpful By - on August 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
Finally a book which gets off from the usual running book concept. This book doesn't really cover training but it's all about biomechanics of running. It teaches you to analyze your own biomechanics and teaches you to improve your running form with certain exercises. This book is mostly about strength training and stretching and it shows the proven training methods on how can you improve your performance and decrease your injuries. This book finally gave my strength training program a real direction.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Anthony on June 27, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book would be great for anyone who is serious about running and desires to find ways to increase performance. The sections that break down the actual mechanics of running are complicated, but I found them to be interesting. The sections on stretching and weightlifting exercises specifically for running are outstanding. The chapter on the effects shoes have on feet and the case for spending more time barefoot is also a highlight.
If you are a casual runner who is happy and not interested in making running a top priority in your life, then I would personally skip this book. If you are "into" running and seeking a deeper understanding of what the mechanics of the run are and how to improve your run, then I cannot see how this book would not help you.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful By DaddioVits on December 2, 2006
Format: Paperback
Almost. Yessis and Yessis (two authors) focus on the biomechanics of running, which is unusual and perhaps distinctive among publications - we've got the way to train, mostly from Jack D., and now this is an almost good book for telling us how to run. The descriptions of proper running style, and the exercises to achieve proper running style, are in the book.

But you really have to dig. What makes this book 'almost good' is that there is no structure or system to its presentation. Y & Y say what they have to say. Once. Twice, a different way. Third, a different way. And so on.

The redundancy is really not the bad point - the bad point is that there's so much laid out, it's hard to tell what you should do first. Doing it all, well, that would take eight hours a set.

Another bad point. There are far, far more 'non-examples' of runners displaying INcorrect running style than examples of runners displaying correct running style. For the typical reader (I presume I am among them), I want to see someone running right . . . not endless pictures of people who are running and are doing two, three, or four things wrong.

It seems like Y & Y have one favorite sprinter in the book who does it all right. Everyone else, be they your average marathon runner or the state high school 1,500 meeter champ or a nationally ranked 5,000 meter competitor, displays a running style per Y & Y that is "almost, but not quite, right."

The pictures are a great, great idea - but next version show us how to run, biomechanically, the right way. Give us pictures of people who either naturally or with training, are doing it ALL right. (A value-added add-on of course would be a DVD with video clips of runners running the right way.
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32 of 39 people found the following review helpful By mark861 on October 22, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is the book that the competition does not want you to find out about because it has the information you need to become a better competitive runner. The biomechanical aspects of the running stride is dissected and explained in terms that are useful for the layman. Once you understand what an efficient running stride consists of, you can begin to work on a more efficient way of running.
The chapter on barefoot running is a real eye-opener. It reveals the truth about the effects of shoes and how they may be the cause of many foot ailments; not to mention the weakening effects of wearing them.
Chapter 3 and 4 alone are worth the price of the book. This is a must-read for all competitive runners--the elites, weekend warriors, and dreamers. Read it but don't let the competion know about it.
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